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10 Underrated Viking Movies, According To Ranker

Despite the fact that the film’s motion capture technology turned off many viewers, Robert Zemeckis’ adaptation of Beowulf was an ambitious stab at the ancient story. Legendary warrior Beowulf goes on a mission to slay the monster Grendel, and then must contend with Grendel’s mother who seeks revenge.

The folktale of Beowulf is a fixture of many school classrooms, and it was an interesting decision to animate the film instead of making it live-action. Although it was made with now-dated technology, the film succeeded at representing its ancient history well, and the performances shine through the motion capture process.

9 Ragnarok (2013)

Not all Viking films necessarily have to take place in ancient times, and Ragnarok found clever ways to integrate Viking folklore into the modern day. A team of archeologists set out to discover the meaning of ancient runes that were recently discovered. Once on their quest, the team accidentally unleashes an ancient monster from Scandinavian folklore.

Blending elements of history and horror together, the film is required viewing for anyone who is interested in Viking culture. The film utilizes its interesting locations well, and it is a feast for the eyes as the camera sweeps across the landscapes. While it is a bit verbose with its giant monster, it is still a great use of preexisting folklore to tell a compelling story about Vikings.

8 Erik The Viking (1989)

Though the Vikings are generally considered a serious bunch, Erik The Viking took a more silly approach to its story. The film follows Erik, and his band of Viking companions who set out to find Valhalla in order to beg the gods to end the Age of Ragnarok.

In a similar vein to movies like Monty Python and the Holy GrailErik The Viking spoofs the historical epics of the past while also delivering an interesting tale. Anchored by a brilliant performance from Tim Robbins, the movie is a nearly forgotten comedy gem from the 1980s. What makes the movie so great is that it is sidesplittingly funny, while also parodying the well-known aspects of Viking history.

7 Outlander (2008)

In Outlander, the Vikings are an interesting backdrop for a complex Science Fiction story. The film follows an alien named Kainan who crash lands on earth during the age of the Vikings. Along with Kainan, an alien beast also arrives on earth and the off-worlder must work with the Vikings to defeat their mutual enemy.

With an all-star cast including Ron Perlman and John Hurt, Outlander is one of the most unique uses of Viking mythology. Moviegoers had seen plenty of films about the Vikings, but the movie dared to speculate about the origins of classic myths. Even though it isn’t historically accurate, the characters and abundant action are enough to keep most film fans occupied.

6 Viking (2016)

Despite its simple title, the plot of the film Viking is anything but simple, and is practically Shakespearian in its scope. Exiled from his lands by his murderous brothers, Vladimir must assemble an army to reclaim his throne and defeat the advancing Byzantine empire.

Far from the usual Viking fare, Viking presents high melodrama with a backdrop of unbelievable violence. Produced in Russia, the film also offers a uniquely Russian perspective to its story and is unique from the usual Scandinavian presentation of Vikings. while the action sequences are interesting, the story gets somewhat bogged down in too much detail and historical plot points.

5 Pathfinder (1987)

Generally considered one of the best revenge movies of all time, Pathfinder even found itself nominated for an Oscar as well. The film follows a young boy in ancient times who is captured by a band of Vikings and forced to lead them to another helpless settlement. Little do they know that the young boy begins to hatch a plot to get revenge on the savages that killed his family.

By casting the Vikings as the villains, Pathfinder set itself apart from other great movies about the ancient warriors. While their ingenuity has been celebrated, the brutality of the Vikings is often overshadowed in media. At its heart though, the film is a great story of revenge that has the audience rooting for the main character to succeed in his quest for retribution.

4 The Vikings (1958)

Starring Kirk Douglas in one of his most iconic roles, The Vikings captured the charm of old Hollywood in an exciting tale of ancient intrigue. The film follows a pair of Viking brothers who fight over the throne and for the hand of the beautiful princess.

Kirk Douglas and Tony Curtis are electric opposite one another, and their sparring is the stuff of cinema legend. While the film eschews the ultra-violence of most Viking movies, it still delivers a compelling story with beautiful sets, all presented in the signature technicolor pallet of 1950s cinema.

3 Valhalla Rising (2009)

Representing a crossroads in history, Valhalla Rising is a stunning character portrait with a Viking aesthetic. The film follows a pagan warrior who escapes his bonds of slavery and joins a group of Crusaders on their quest to invade the Holy Land.

Filled with his signature visual style, the film is one of the best examples of director Nicolas Winding Refn’s work. Slick, and yet gritty at the same time, there is enough action to counterbalance the film’s more artistic digressions. Mads Mikkelsen shines in the film, and is able to give a compelling performance without speaking a single line of dialogue.

2 The Last King (2016)

While most Viking films simply tell a story within the Viking lore, The Last King actually pulled its tale from the pages of Norwegian history. As the nation is gripped by a civil war, the king of Norway’s illegitimate son is guarded by two secretive warriors who hold the country’s future in their hands.

Set in the snow-blanketed landscapes of Norway’s rural countryside, the film captures the beauty and bleakness of its setting perfectly. Though cinema has thoroughly covered medieval times, the look at medieval Norway is an interesting change of pace. The film may not take place during the golden age of the Vikings, but the story shows what happened to those warriors a few generations down the line.

1 The 13th Warrior (1999)

Despite the fact that it was a box office bomb, The 13th Warrior still managed to impress fans of Viking movies with its over-the-top action, and lavish set pieces. The film follows a Middle Eastern diplomat who is traveling through Europe that finds himself embroiled in a conflict between two warring clans of Vikings.

Based on the Michael Crichton novel, The 13th Warrior went for the gusto with its action, and didn’t disappoint in that department. While it may not have been praised for its realism or historical accuracy, the film’s set design was topnotch, and it had a slick look that seemed to take advantage of every penny of its inflated budget.


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10 Perfect Superhero Casting Decisions, According To Reddit


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10 Underrated Viking Movies, According To Ranker

Despite the fact that the film’s motion capture technology turned off many viewers, Robert Zemeckis’ adaptation of Beowulf was an ambitious stab at the ancient story. Legendary warrior Beowulf goes on a mission to slay the monster Grendel, and then must contend with Grendel’s mother who seeks revenge.
The folktale of Beowulf is a fixture of many school classrooms, and it was an interesting decision to animate the film instead of making it live-action. Although it was made with now-dated technology, the film succeeded at representing its ancient history well, and the performances shine through the motion capture process.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1528733612385-eer-REPEAT1’); });

9 Ragnarok (2013)

Not all Viking films necessarily have to take place in ancient times, and Ragnarok found clever ways to integrate Viking folklore into the modern day. A team of archeologists set out to discover the meaning of ancient runes that were recently discovered. Once on their quest, the team accidentally unleashes an ancient monster from Scandinavian folklore.
Blending elements of history and horror together, the film is required viewing for anyone who is interested in Viking culture. The film utilizes its interesting locations well, and it is a feast for the eyes as the camera sweeps across the landscapes. While it is a bit verbose with its giant monster, it is still a great use of preexisting folklore to tell a compelling story about Vikings.
8 Erik The Viking (1989)

Though the Vikings are generally considered a serious bunch, Erik The Viking took a more silly approach to its story. The film follows Erik, and his band of Viking companions who set out to find Valhalla in order to beg the gods to end the Age of Ragnarok.
In a similar vein to movies like Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Erik The Viking spoofs the historical epics of the past while also delivering an interesting tale. Anchored by a brilliant performance from Tim Robbins, the movie is a nearly forgotten comedy gem from the 1980s. What makes the movie so great is that it is sidesplittingly funny, while also parodying the well-known aspects of Viking history.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1528733612385-eer-REPEAT2’); });

7 Outlander (2008)

In Outlander, the Vikings are an interesting backdrop for a complex Science Fiction story. The film follows an alien named Kainan who crash lands on earth during the age of the Vikings. Along with Kainan, an alien beast also arrives on earth and the off-worlder must work with the Vikings to defeat their mutual enemy.
With an all-star cast including Ron Perlman and John Hurt, Outlander is one of the most unique uses of Viking mythology. Moviegoers had seen plenty of films about the Vikings, but the movie dared to speculate about the origins of classic myths. Even though it isn’t historically accurate, the characters and abundant action are enough to keep most film fans occupied.
6 Viking (2016)

Despite its simple title, the plot of the film Viking is anything but simple, and is practically Shakespearian in its scope. Exiled from his lands by his murderous brothers, Vladimir must assemble an army to reclaim his throne and defeat the advancing Byzantine empire.
Far from the usual Viking fare, Viking presents high melodrama with a backdrop of unbelievable violence. Produced in Russia, the film also offers a uniquely Russian perspective to its story and is unique from the usual Scandinavian presentation of Vikings. while the action sequences are interesting, the story gets somewhat bogged down in too much detail and historical plot points.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1528733612385-eer-REPEAT3’); });

5 Pathfinder (1987)

Generally considered one of the best revenge movies of all time, Pathfinder even found itself nominated for an Oscar as well. The film follows a young boy in ancient times who is captured by a band of Vikings and forced to lead them to another helpless settlement. Little do they know that the young boy begins to hatch a plot to get revenge on the savages that killed his family.
By casting the Vikings as the villains, Pathfinder set itself apart from other great movies about the ancient warriors. While their ingenuity has been celebrated, the brutality of the Vikings is often overshadowed in media. At its heart though, the film is a great story of revenge that has the audience rooting for the main character to succeed in his quest for retribution.
4 The Vikings (1958)

Starring Kirk Douglas in one of his most iconic roles, The Vikings captured the charm of old Hollywood in an exciting tale of ancient intrigue. The film follows a pair of Viking brothers who fight over the throne and for the hand of the beautiful princess.
Kirk Douglas and Tony Curtis are electric opposite one another, and their sparring is the stuff of cinema legend. While the film eschews the ultra-violence of most Viking movies, it still delivers a compelling story with beautiful sets, all presented in the signature technicolor pallet of 1950s cinema.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1528733612385-eer-REPEAT4’); });

3 Valhalla Rising (2009)

Representing a crossroads in history, Valhalla Rising is a stunning character portrait with a Viking aesthetic. The film follows a pagan warrior who escapes his bonds of slavery and joins a group of Crusaders on their quest to invade the Holy Land.
Filled with his signature visual style, the film is one of the best examples of director Nicolas Winding Refn’s work. Slick, and yet gritty at the same time, there is enough action to counterbalance the film’s more artistic digressions. Mads Mikkelsen shines in the film, and is able to give a compelling performance without speaking a single line of dialogue.
2 The Last King (2016)

While most Viking films simply tell a story within the Viking lore, The Last King actually pulled its tale from the pages of Norwegian history. As the nation is gripped by a civil war, the king of Norway’s illegitimate son is guarded by two secretive warriors who hold the country’s future in their hands.
Set in the snow-blanketed landscapes of Norway’s rural countryside, the film captures the beauty and bleakness of its setting perfectly. Though cinema has thoroughly covered medieval times, the look at medieval Norway is an interesting change of pace. The film may not take place during the golden age of the Vikings, but the story shows what happened to those warriors a few generations down the line.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1528733612385-eer-REPEAT5’); });

1 The 13th Warrior (1999)

Despite the fact that it was a box office bomb, The 13th Warrior still managed to impress fans of Viking movies with its over-the-top action, and lavish set pieces. The film follows a Middle Eastern diplomat who is traveling through Europe that finds himself embroiled in a conflict between two warring clans of Vikings.
Based on the Michael Crichton novel, The 13th Warrior went for the gusto with its action, and didn’t disappoint in that department. While it may not have been praised for its realism or historical accuracy, the film’s set design was topnotch, and it had a slick look that seemed to take advantage of every penny of its inflated budget.
Next10 Perfect Superhero Casting Decisions, According To Reddit

#Underrated #Viking #Movies #Ranker

10 Underrated Viking Movies, According To Ranker

Despite the fact that the film’s motion capture technology turned off many viewers, Robert Zemeckis’ adaptation of Beowulf was an ambitious stab at the ancient story. Legendary warrior Beowulf goes on a mission to slay the monster Grendel, and then must contend with Grendel’s mother who seeks revenge.
The folktale of Beowulf is a fixture of many school classrooms, and it was an interesting decision to animate the film instead of making it live-action. Although it was made with now-dated technology, the film succeeded at representing its ancient history well, and the performances shine through the motion capture process.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1528733612385-eer-REPEAT1’); });

9 Ragnarok (2013)

Not all Viking films necessarily have to take place in ancient times, and Ragnarok found clever ways to integrate Viking folklore into the modern day. A team of archeologists set out to discover the meaning of ancient runes that were recently discovered. Once on their quest, the team accidentally unleashes an ancient monster from Scandinavian folklore.
Blending elements of history and horror together, the film is required viewing for anyone who is interested in Viking culture. The film utilizes its interesting locations well, and it is a feast for the eyes as the camera sweeps across the landscapes. While it is a bit verbose with its giant monster, it is still a great use of preexisting folklore to tell a compelling story about Vikings.
8 Erik The Viking (1989)

Though the Vikings are generally considered a serious bunch, Erik The Viking took a more silly approach to its story. The film follows Erik, and his band of Viking companions who set out to find Valhalla in order to beg the gods to end the Age of Ragnarok.
In a similar vein to movies like Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Erik The Viking spoofs the historical epics of the past while also delivering an interesting tale. Anchored by a brilliant performance from Tim Robbins, the movie is a nearly forgotten comedy gem from the 1980s. What makes the movie so great is that it is sidesplittingly funny, while also parodying the well-known aspects of Viking history.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1528733612385-eer-REPEAT2’); });

7 Outlander (2008)

In Outlander, the Vikings are an interesting backdrop for a complex Science Fiction story. The film follows an alien named Kainan who crash lands on earth during the age of the Vikings. Along with Kainan, an alien beast also arrives on earth and the off-worlder must work with the Vikings to defeat their mutual enemy.
With an all-star cast including Ron Perlman and John Hurt, Outlander is one of the most unique uses of Viking mythology. Moviegoers had seen plenty of films about the Vikings, but the movie dared to speculate about the origins of classic myths. Even though it isn’t historically accurate, the characters and abundant action are enough to keep most film fans occupied.
6 Viking (2016)

Despite its simple title, the plot of the film Viking is anything but simple, and is practically Shakespearian in its scope. Exiled from his lands by his murderous brothers, Vladimir must assemble an army to reclaim his throne and defeat the advancing Byzantine empire.
Far from the usual Viking fare, Viking presents high melodrama with a backdrop of unbelievable violence. Produced in Russia, the film also offers a uniquely Russian perspective to its story and is unique from the usual Scandinavian presentation of Vikings. while the action sequences are interesting, the story gets somewhat bogged down in too much detail and historical plot points.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1528733612385-eer-REPEAT3’); });

5 Pathfinder (1987)

Generally considered one of the best revenge movies of all time, Pathfinder even found itself nominated for an Oscar as well. The film follows a young boy in ancient times who is captured by a band of Vikings and forced to lead them to another helpless settlement. Little do they know that the young boy begins to hatch a plot to get revenge on the savages that killed his family.
By casting the Vikings as the villains, Pathfinder set itself apart from other great movies about the ancient warriors. While their ingenuity has been celebrated, the brutality of the Vikings is often overshadowed in media. At its heart though, the film is a great story of revenge that has the audience rooting for the main character to succeed in his quest for retribution.
4 The Vikings (1958)

Starring Kirk Douglas in one of his most iconic roles, The Vikings captured the charm of old Hollywood in an exciting tale of ancient intrigue. The film follows a pair of Viking brothers who fight over the throne and for the hand of the beautiful princess.
Kirk Douglas and Tony Curtis are electric opposite one another, and their sparring is the stuff of cinema legend. While the film eschews the ultra-violence of most Viking movies, it still delivers a compelling story with beautiful sets, all presented in the signature technicolor pallet of 1950s cinema.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1528733612385-eer-REPEAT4’); });

3 Valhalla Rising (2009)

Representing a crossroads in history, Valhalla Rising is a stunning character portrait with a Viking aesthetic. The film follows a pagan warrior who escapes his bonds of slavery and joins a group of Crusaders on their quest to invade the Holy Land.
Filled with his signature visual style, the film is one of the best examples of director Nicolas Winding Refn’s work. Slick, and yet gritty at the same time, there is enough action to counterbalance the film’s more artistic digressions. Mads Mikkelsen shines in the film, and is able to give a compelling performance without speaking a single line of dialogue.
2 The Last King (2016)

While most Viking films simply tell a story within the Viking lore, The Last King actually pulled its tale from the pages of Norwegian history. As the nation is gripped by a civil war, the king of Norway’s illegitimate son is guarded by two secretive warriors who hold the country’s future in their hands.
Set in the snow-blanketed landscapes of Norway’s rural countryside, the film captures the beauty and bleakness of its setting perfectly. Though cinema has thoroughly covered medieval times, the look at medieval Norway is an interesting change of pace. The film may not take place during the golden age of the Vikings, but the story shows what happened to those warriors a few generations down the line.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1528733612385-eer-REPEAT5’); });

1 The 13th Warrior (1999)

Despite the fact that it was a box office bomb, The 13th Warrior still managed to impress fans of Viking movies with its over-the-top action, and lavish set pieces. The film follows a Middle Eastern diplomat who is traveling through Europe that finds himself embroiled in a conflict between two warring clans of Vikings.
Based on the Michael Crichton novel, The 13th Warrior went for the gusto with its action, and didn’t disappoint in that department. While it may not have been praised for its realism or historical accuracy, the film’s set design was topnotch, and it had a slick look that seemed to take advantage of every penny of its inflated budget.
Next10 Perfect Superhero Casting Decisions, According To Reddit

#Underrated #Viking #Movies #Ranker


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