News

App Store Spring Cleaning May Cause Headaches for Everyone

Even fully functional apps can be uninstalled.

  • The new policy removes outdated apps and non-compliant apps from sale.
  • Developers may have to do “fake” updates to stay in the store.
  • The policy is good, but Apple’s enforcement is inconsistent.

Gene Winerin / Unsplash

Apple will be cleaning the App Store in the spring, removing apps that haven’t been updated in a while, as well as apps that may contain your favorite apps.

Apple has started emailing developers and warning them that sales of the app will be canceled because it hasn’t been updated recently. The problem with this is that many apps simply don’t need to be updated. For example, a calculator app or other tuner does not require changes or additions to new features. Is this good news for customers, bad news for developers, or something else?

“The main purpose of this ‘update’ is to clean up the App Store and remove apps that no longer work as expected and apps that crash when opened. Mobile app developer Will Manuel told Lifewire in an email.

golden age

Apple’s statement on this issue states that incompatible apps will be removed after 30 days unless developers update their apps. You do not specify a period. However, game developer Robert Kabwe proto pop game, received an email saying that his game Motivoto “has not been updated for a while and will be withdrawn after 30 days”. the game is In a tweet, the developer says:more than 2 years.

It sounds like a nightmare, but there is another side to the story. app developer This is what Nick Sheriff said on Twitter. In Apple’s terminology, “Apps that haven’t been updated for more than three years make it clear that they have a reason for uninstallation. This means that most, if not all apps, will be uninstalled.”

“The main purpose of this ‘update’ is to clear up clutter in the app store and remove apps that no longer work as expected…”

spring cleaning

If you’ve ever spent time browsing the App Store, you know that when you bought the app, it was last updated 6 years ago. It might work well, but if you were a little more careful, you might have opted for a more aggressively developed app.

Apple’s new rule is to remove dead trees from businesses. It’s not just “outdated” apps that are at risk. Apps that do not “behave as expected” or do not meet “current review guidelines” are also displayed. And apps that fail to start are removed immediately.

If you’re already enjoying your old apps, no worries. You can still download and use it. The only change is that these apps will be withdrawn from sale and no one will be able to purchase them.

And perhaps the most important part of these rules is that they apply to apps that don’t follow the “current rating guidelines.” Do you know all the apps in the store that haven’t been updated so you don’t have to add a privacy label to your app store listing? They’re probably out too.

desultory

So what’s the problem? Isn’t that good politics, except when a three-year-old app stays the same on the day it was launched? Yes, this can be a good guideline, but the app store review process is often inconsistent and even volatile in the way it interprets the guidelines.

iPhone with illuminated home screen and App Store icon.

Tom Bradley / Unsplash

“[It] It wouldn’t have been so bad if the app store review team knew what they were actually doing,” app developer Neon Silicon said on the Audiobus Music App Forum. [a music app]. The idea that they will do retrospective reviews on a regular basis really makes me not want to submit anything new to the App Store.”

In theory, these old but still great apps should be reviewed and approved by the app review team. In practice, however, the blanket rule is more likely to apply to everything over a certain age. While as usual, well-meaning small indie developers get caught up in cleanup, legacy games that still earn sweet in-app purchases (30% off Apple) can mysteriously remain intact.

As always with app stores, balance is important, but the history of app reviews and odd choices means that they can cause more problems than they solve in the end.


More information

App Store Spring Cleaning May Cause Headaches for Everyone

Even apps that work perfectly could be removed

New guidelines will remove old and non-compliant apps from sale.
Developers may have to do “fake” updates just to stay in the store. 
The policy is good, but Apple’s enforcement is inconsistent.
Jean Winnerlin / Unsplash

Apple is about to spring clean the App Store, throwing out apps that haven’t been updated for a while—and that may include some of your favorite apps. 

Apple has started to email developers, warning them that apps will be removed from sale because they haven’t been updated recently. The problem here is that plenty of apps just don’t need to be updated. A calculator app, or a guitar tuner, for example, don’t need to change or add new features. So is this good news for customers, bad news for developers, or something else?

“The main point of this ‘update’ is to clean out the dead weight in the app store and remove apps that no longer function as expected, and apps that crash upon opening will be removed. I think this is good for the overall marketplace ecosystem, although it may create a shakeup in the short term,” mobile app developer Will Manuel told Lifewire via email. 

Golden Oldies

Apple’s statement on the matter says that non-compliant apps will be removed after 30 days if the developer doesn’t update the app. It does not specify a time frame. However, game developer Robert Kabwe a game designer for Protopop Games, received an email telling him that his game Motivoto “has not been updated in a significant amount of time and is scheduled to be removed from sale in 30 days.” The game is, says the developer in a tweet, more than two years old. 

This sounds like a nightmare, but there’s another side to the story. App developer Nick Sheriff says on Twitter that Apple’s terms “state clearly that Apps that have not been updated for the past three years or more are grounds for removal, it means they will not remove all but will remove most.”

“The main point of this ‘update’ is to clean out the dead weight in the app store and remove apps that no longer function as expected…”
Spring Clean

If you’ve ever spent any time browsing the App Store, you’ll be familiar with the feeling you get when you buy an app, only to realize it was last updated six years ago. Perhaps it works fine but had you paid a little more attention, you might have opted for a more actively-developed app. 

Apple’s new rules are there to prune the deadwood from the store. It’s not just “outdated” apps that face the chop. Apps that fail to “function as expected” or do not follow “current review guidelines” will also be put on notice. And apps that fail to launch will be removed immediately. 

If you already enjoy an outdated app, you don’t have to worry. You’ll still be able to download and use it. The only change is that these apps will be removed from sale, so nobody will be able to buy them. 

And perhaps the most important part of these rules is the bit that applies to apps that don’t meet “current review guidelines.” You know all those apps in the store that haven’t been updated in order to avoid having to add privacy labels to their App Store listing? Those are probably on their way out too. 

Inconsistent

So what’s the problem? Apart from the case where a three-year-old app is still as good as the day it was launched, isn’t this a good policy? Well, yes, it might be a good policy, but the App Store review process is inconsistent, even capricious, in the way it interprets policy. 

Thom Bradley / Unsplash

“[It] wouldn’t be so bad if the App Store review teams actually knew what they were doing,” said app developer Neon Silicon on the Audiobus music app forum. “It’s hard enough to deal with the normal review process when submitting [a music app]. The thought that they will be doing periodic retroactive reviews really doesn’t make me want to submit anything new to the App Store at all.”

In theory, those old but still-great apps should be looked over by the app review team and given a pass. But in reality, it’s more likely that a blanket rule will be applied to anything over a certain age. As usual, small indie developers with good intentions will be caught up in the purge, while old games that still rake in those sweet in-app purchases (of which Apple takes a 30% cut) may end up mysteriously unscathed. 

As ever with the App Store, it’s a balance, but the history of App Review, and its weird decisions, means that this could end up causing more problems than it solves.

#App #Store #Spring #Cleaning #Headaches

App Store Spring Cleaning May Cause Headaches for Everyone

Even apps that work perfectly could be removed

New guidelines will remove old and non-compliant apps from sale.
Developers may have to do “fake” updates just to stay in the store. 
The policy is good, but Apple’s enforcement is inconsistent.
Jean Winnerlin / Unsplash

Apple is about to spring clean the App Store, throwing out apps that haven’t been updated for a while—and that may include some of your favorite apps. 

Apple has started to email developers, warning them that apps will be removed from sale because they haven’t been updated recently. The problem here is that plenty of apps just don’t need to be updated. A calculator app, or a guitar tuner, for example, don’t need to change or add new features. So is this good news for customers, bad news for developers, or something else?

“The main point of this ‘update’ is to clean out the dead weight in the app store and remove apps that no longer function as expected, and apps that crash upon opening will be removed. I think this is good for the overall marketplace ecosystem, although it may create a shakeup in the short term,” mobile app developer Will Manuel told Lifewire via email. 

Golden Oldies

Apple’s statement on the matter says that non-compliant apps will be removed after 30 days if the developer doesn’t update the app. It does not specify a time frame. However, game developer Robert Kabwe a game designer for Protopop Games, received an email telling him that his game Motivoto “has not been updated in a significant amount of time and is scheduled to be removed from sale in 30 days.” The game is, says the developer in a tweet, more than two years old. 

This sounds like a nightmare, but there’s another side to the story. App developer Nick Sheriff says on Twitter that Apple’s terms “state clearly that Apps that have not been updated for the past three years or more are grounds for removal, it means they will not remove all but will remove most.”

“The main point of this ‘update’ is to clean out the dead weight in the app store and remove apps that no longer function as expected…”
Spring Clean

If you’ve ever spent any time browsing the App Store, you’ll be familiar with the feeling you get when you buy an app, only to realize it was last updated six years ago. Perhaps it works fine but had you paid a little more attention, you might have opted for a more actively-developed app. 

Apple’s new rules are there to prune the deadwood from the store. It’s not just “outdated” apps that face the chop. Apps that fail to “function as expected” or do not follow “current review guidelines” will also be put on notice. And apps that fail to launch will be removed immediately. 

If you already enjoy an outdated app, you don’t have to worry. You’ll still be able to download and use it. The only change is that these apps will be removed from sale, so nobody will be able to buy them. 

And perhaps the most important part of these rules is the bit that applies to apps that don’t meet “current review guidelines.” You know all those apps in the store that haven’t been updated in order to avoid having to add privacy labels to their App Store listing? Those are probably on their way out too. 

Inconsistent

So what’s the problem? Apart from the case where a three-year-old app is still as good as the day it was launched, isn’t this a good policy? Well, yes, it might be a good policy, but the App Store review process is inconsistent, even capricious, in the way it interprets policy. 

Thom Bradley / Unsplash

“[It] wouldn’t be so bad if the App Store review teams actually knew what they were doing,” said app developer Neon Silicon on the Audiobus music app forum. “It’s hard enough to deal with the normal review process when submitting [a music app]. The thought that they will be doing periodic retroactive reviews really doesn’t make me want to submit anything new to the App Store at all.”

In theory, those old but still-great apps should be looked over by the app review team and given a pass. But in reality, it’s more likely that a blanket rule will be applied to anything over a certain age. As usual, small indie developers with good intentions will be caught up in the purge, while old games that still rake in those sweet in-app purchases (of which Apple takes a 30% cut) may end up mysteriously unscathed. 

As ever with the App Store, it’s a balance, but the history of App Review, and its weird decisions, means that this could end up causing more problems than it solves.

#App #Store #Spring #Cleaning #Headaches


Synthetic: Vik News

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I'm Do Thuy, passionate about creativity, blogging every day is what I'm doing. It's really what I love. Follow me for useful knowledge about society, community and learning.

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