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Bridge To Terabithia: The Movie’s 10 Best Quotes NEXT: 12 Children’s Movies That Will Make You Cry

When Leslie first enters school, she quickly understands how everything works, including the things to avoid. Then she immediately annoys the bully Janice for fun.

Jess tells Leslie not to raise the issue, but Leslie counters by saying that Janice will be harassed whether she’s interested or not, so she can enjoy herself before the punishment that comes anyway.

way of life

“You know, the best prize life has to offer is an opportunity to work hard at something worth doing.”

After Leslie’s parents finish the book, they decide to paint one of the rooms in the house gold to capture the sunset light. They tell Jess about her love for her art, and Leslie’s father shares a few words of wisdom, citing Teddy Roosevelt.

Because Jess is the only boy in the family, parrot his parents’ words to burden the house with chores and chores. He hopes the words can convey to him the fun and endearing nature of Leslie’s parents, but stays away from them for much of the film until they realize they could lose him forever.

Access to Terravisia

“You’ll find out. Close your eyes and keep your heart wide open.”

One of the most important elements of Bridge to Terravicia Their imagination was so powerful that Jess and Leslie were able to escape from life and develop their courage. Theravisia is a virtual place where everyone wishes to become a reality with the beautiful images and the power of imagination that movies provide.

But it can be difficult to access the realm of pure imagination in a world where too many forces force us into reality. So, as Leslie said, fans have to close their eyes to see it, but keep their minds wide open.

Leslie’s Approach to Religion

“Honestly, I don’t think God is doing the work of condemning people to hell. He’s too busy to do all of this.”

Leslie, attending church for the first time, tells Jess and his sister May Belle about God and death. Maybell claims she doubts God and the Bible will send someone to Hell after death. Jess expresses some doubts about this and Leslie shares her own opinion.

Leslie sees the world as a beautiful place where her imagination can bring her anything she could ever want. With such a positive view of life, Leslie rejects such a pessimistic view of death. Her words will comfort Jess after her death and will make Leslie believe that she is in heaven regardless of her Christian beliefs.

lies vs fiction

“No, I built it. This is not a lie.”

Leslie is honored in class for her essay on scuba diving, and Jess is furious by claiming that Leslie had lied when she found out that it was fiction. She rejects this idea because lying harms others. She states what she has done to improve the diving experience.

A strong proponent of fantasy and fiction, Leslie makes it clear to her audience that even if something isn’t false, it can’t be true. Imagination can improve everyone’s life, and we must not be bound by the privileges we have experienced.

Blame yourself for death

“It’s terrible. It’s ridiculous. But it’s not your fault.”

Bridge to Terravicia While Jess crumbles over Leslie’s death, it gives the audience one of the best grieving performances on the screen. She died when the rope they swung every day broke and eventually drowned in the creek below. But Jess blames herself.

Instead of dating Leslie, he went to the museum with his favorite teacher. If he had asked Leslie to go with them, she wouldn’t have gone there to wield the rope. If he had been with her, he would probably have gotten her help. But despite these endless family problems, the film’s message is that Leslie’s death wasn’t Jess’s fault. It was just a tragedy.

Use your imagination to gain courage

“And whoever can defend theirs against Sqrogart is afraid of Hogart? / Are you saying that a girl who can fight a giant troll is afraid of a foolish eight-year-old?”

What would be a good adult movie if there was no tyrant to defeat? Leslie and Jess have enemies in the form of Janice and Hogart at school. Their basic instinct is to avoid trouble, but they use their experience in Terravicia to give Jesse the power to fight Hogart and to identify Janice when Leslie cries.

This demonstrates the beneficial power of imagination. Jess and Leslie aren’t just escaping everyday life. They are also stronger in everyday life. They use battles fought together to support each other and face the new threats they must face.

Remembering lost loved ones

“When my husband died, people kept telling me not to cry. People kept trying to help me forget. But I didn’t want to forget.”

After Leslie’s death, Jessie quarrels with another student who made cruel remarks that ridiculed her death. Jess’s teacher pulls him out of class, but instead of scolding him for his struggles, she tries to empathize with his struggles.

When someone is sad, the people around them try to help them by saying a lot of good intentions but ultimately unhelpful things. Instead of saying sorry to Jess or other common words of condolences, she talks about her experience and opens the door whenever he’s ready to let him know what he needs, whether it’s what others expect or not. .

Terravicia’s Warcry

“We rule Terravicia! And nothing weighs us down!”

Children often feel helpless because they are bullied by adults, teachers, and peers. However, being born and living in Terravicia makes Jess and Leslie stronger and feels capable of carrying out all the missions the kingdom asks of them.

Audiences may wonder why children are often left unsupervised enough to create whole worlds in which they feel they are valuable, but many children live in similar situations in the real world. The film gives them a place to turn when they feel helpless and a cry to remember when defeated.

The best memories of those we lost

“She brought you something special when she came here, right? Wait a minute. This is how you keep them alive.”

It can be difficult to hold onto the good part of a dead person without being weighed down by the weight of everything lost. Although Jess’s father is often an antagonist, Bridge to TerraviciaHe gives Jess important advice on how to deal with her grief and Leslie’s loss.

It’s not the right way to pretend you have nothing to lose. By embracing all the good things they’ve given you, Jess creates a safer passage to Terra Vicia and shares it with her sister so that her imaginary magic lives on.


More information

Bridge To Terabithia: The Movie’s 10 Best Quotes
NEXT: 12 Children’s Movies That Will Make You Cry

When Leslie comes to school for the first time, she quickly gets a feel for how things work, including who should be avoided. She then promptly antagonizes bully Janice for the fun of it.
Jess tells Leslie not to ask for trouble, but Leslie counters by explaining that Janice will be a bully whether she draws attention to herself or not, so she might as well enjoy herself before receiving the punishment that was coming either way.
An Approach To Life
“You Know, The Best Prize That Life Offers Is The Chance To Work Hard At Work Worth Doing.”

After Leslie’s parents finish writing their book, they decide to paint one of the rooms of the house gold to catch the light of sunset. They talk to Jess about his love for art and Leslie’s dad quotes Teddy Roosevelt to share some words of wisdom.
Jess parrots the words back to his parents, who pile him down with chores and work because he’s the only boy in the family. He is hopeful that the words might communicate some of the fun-loving nature of Leslie’s parents to his own, but he remains distanced from them for the majority of the film until they realize they could’ve lost him forever.
How To Access Terabithia
“You’ll See. Just Close Your Eyes, And Keep Your Mind Wide Open.”

One of the most important elements of Bridge to Terabithia was how powerful imagination was, giving Jess and Leslie an escape from their lives and building up their courage. Terabithia is a fictional place that everyone wishes were real, with the beautiful imagery that the film provides of it and the power of imagination over it.
But in a world with so many forces pressuring us to be realistic, it can be hard to access a realm of pure imagination. So, as Leslie says, fans will need to close their eyes to see it, but keep their minds wide open.
Leslie’s Approach To Religion
“I Seriously Do Not Think God Goes Around Damning People To Hell. He’s Too Busy Running All This.”

After going to church for the first time, Leslie discusses God and death with Jess and his little sister May Belle. May Belle insists that doubting God and the Bible will send someone to Hell after they die. Jess expresses some doubt about that, and Leslie shares her own opinion.
Leslie sees the world as a beautiful place where her imagination can bring her anything she could want. With such a positive attitude toward life, Leslie scorns such a pessimistic look at death. Her words will likely be a comfort to Jess after she dies, allowing him to believe that Leslie is in heaven regardless of her faith in Christian beliefs.
Lies Versus Fiction
“No, I Made It Up. That’s Different Than Lying.”

Leslie gets honored in class for her essay on scuba diving, and when Jess discovers that it was fictional, he gets upset with Leslie, claiming she has lied. She pushes back on that idea since lies are harmful to other people. What she did, she specifies, was make her scuba diving experience up.
Leslie is a strong proponent of imagination and fiction and makes it clear to audiences that something can be untrue without being a lie. Fantasy can improve everyone’s lives, and they shouldn’t be bound by only what they’ve had the opportunity to experience for themselves.
Blaming Yourself For Mortality
“It’s A Terrible Thing. It Doesn’t Make Any Sense. But It’s Not Your Fault.”

Bridge to Terabithia provides audiences with one of the best portrayals of grief on screen, with Jess breaking down over Leslie’s death. She died because the rope they swung on every day broke, and she ended up drowning in the creek beneath it. But Jess blames himself.
Instead of being with Leslie, he had gone on a trip to a museum with a teacher he had a crush on. Had he asked Leslie to go with them, she wouldn’t have been there to swing on the rope. Had he been with her, he might have been able to get her help. But despite these endless what-ifs, the message this film sends is that Leslie’s death was not Jess’s fault; it was just a tragedy.
Using Fantasy To Gain Courage
“And The Guy Who Can Stand Up To A Sqrogart Is Scared Of A Hogart? / A Girl Who Can Stand Up To A Giant Troll Is Scared Of Some Dumb Eighth Grader?”

What’s a good coming-of-age movie without a bully to defeat? Leslie and Jess both have enemies at school, in the form of Janice and Hogart. While their base instincts might be to just avoid trouble, they use their experiences in Terabithia to help them gain the strength for Jess to stand up to Hogart and Leslie to check on Janice when she was crying.
This shows off the beneficial power of imagination. Jess and Leslie don’t just have an escape from their everyday lives; they are stronger in their normal lives as well. They support each other and draw on the battles they have fought together to stand against any new threats they have to face.
Remembering Lost Loved Ones
“When My Husband Died, People Kept Telling Me Not To Cry. People Kept Trying To Help Me Forget. But I Didn’t Want To Forget.”

After Leslie’s death, Jess gets into a fight with another student who made a cruel comment mocking her death. Jess’s teacher pulls him out of class, but rather than scolding him for fighting, she tries to empathize with his struggles.
When someone is grieving, those around them try to help them by telling them any number of well-meaning but ultimately unhelpful things. Rather than telling Jess that she’s sorry, or any other standard grief sayings, she tells him about her own experience and opens the door for him to share what he needs whenever he’s ready, whether it’s what other people expect or not.
Terabithia’s War Call
“We Rule Terabithia! And Nothing Crushes Us!”

Children often see themselves as powerless, being controlled by their adults and teachers, as well as the bullies among their peers. But by creating and living in Terabithia, Jess and Leslie feel strong and capable of taking on any task that their kingdom needs from them.
Although audiences might wonder why the children were left unsupervised often enough to create an entire world where they felt valuable, many children live with similar circumstances in the real world. This film gives them somewhere to turn when they feel powerless, and a battle cry to shout in their minds when they feel defeated.
Remembering The Best Of Those We’ve Lost
“She Brought You Something Special When She Came Here, Didn’t She? That’s What You Hold Onto. That’s How You Keep Her Alive.”

It can be hard to hold onto the good parts of someone who has died without being crushed under the weight of everything that has been lost. Though Jess’s dad is often an antagonist in Bridge to Terabithia, he does offer Jess important advice on how to approach his grief and cope with the loss of Leslie.
Pretending that there was never a person to lose is not the way. Embracing all of the good that they gave you is, which leads Jess to build a safer passage to Terabithia and share it with his sister, to keep the magic of imagination alive.

#Bridge #Terabithia #Movies #QuotesNEXT #Childrens #Movies #Cry

Bridge To Terabithia: The Movie’s 10 Best Quotes
NEXT: 12 Children’s Movies That Will Make You Cry

When Leslie comes to school for the first time, she quickly gets a feel for how things work, including who should be avoided. She then promptly antagonizes bully Janice for the fun of it.
Jess tells Leslie not to ask for trouble, but Leslie counters by explaining that Janice will be a bully whether she draws attention to herself or not, so she might as well enjoy herself before receiving the punishment that was coming either way.
An Approach To Life
“You Know, The Best Prize That Life Offers Is The Chance To Work Hard At Work Worth Doing.”

After Leslie’s parents finish writing their book, they decide to paint one of the rooms of the house gold to catch the light of sunset. They talk to Jess about his love for art and Leslie’s dad quotes Teddy Roosevelt to share some words of wisdom.
Jess parrots the words back to his parents, who pile him down with chores and work because he’s the only boy in the family. He is hopeful that the words might communicate some of the fun-loving nature of Leslie’s parents to his own, but he remains distanced from them for the majority of the film until they realize they could’ve lost him forever.
How To Access Terabithia
“You’ll See. Just Close Your Eyes, And Keep Your Mind Wide Open.”

One of the most important elements of Bridge to Terabithia was how powerful imagination was, giving Jess and Leslie an escape from their lives and building up their courage. Terabithia is a fictional place that everyone wishes were real, with the beautiful imagery that the film provides of it and the power of imagination over it.
But in a world with so many forces pressuring us to be realistic, it can be hard to access a realm of pure imagination. So, as Leslie says, fans will need to close their eyes to see it, but keep their minds wide open.
Leslie’s Approach To Religion
“I Seriously Do Not Think God Goes Around Damning People To Hell. He’s Too Busy Running All This.”

After going to church for the first time, Leslie discusses God and death with Jess and his little sister May Belle. May Belle insists that doubting God and the Bible will send someone to Hell after they die. Jess expresses some doubt about that, and Leslie shares her own opinion.
Leslie sees the world as a beautiful place where her imagination can bring her anything she could want. With such a positive attitude toward life, Leslie scorns such a pessimistic look at death. Her words will likely be a comfort to Jess after she dies, allowing him to believe that Leslie is in heaven regardless of her faith in Christian beliefs.
Lies Versus Fiction
“No, I Made It Up. That’s Different Than Lying.”

Leslie gets honored in class for her essay on scuba diving, and when Jess discovers that it was fictional, he gets upset with Leslie, claiming she has lied. She pushes back on that idea since lies are harmful to other people. What she did, she specifies, was make her scuba diving experience up.
Leslie is a strong proponent of imagination and fiction and makes it clear to audiences that something can be untrue without being a lie. Fantasy can improve everyone’s lives, and they shouldn’t be bound by only what they’ve had the opportunity to experience for themselves.
Blaming Yourself For Mortality
“It’s A Terrible Thing. It Doesn’t Make Any Sense. But It’s Not Your Fault.”

Bridge to Terabithia provides audiences with one of the best portrayals of grief on screen, with Jess breaking down over Leslie’s death. She died because the rope they swung on every day broke, and she ended up drowning in the creek beneath it. But Jess blames himself.
Instead of being with Leslie, he had gone on a trip to a museum with a teacher he had a crush on. Had he asked Leslie to go with them, she wouldn’t have been there to swing on the rope. Had he been with her, he might have been able to get her help. But despite these endless what-ifs, the message this film sends is that Leslie’s death was not Jess’s fault; it was just a tragedy.
Using Fantasy To Gain Courage
“And The Guy Who Can Stand Up To A Sqrogart Is Scared Of A Hogart? / A Girl Who Can Stand Up To A Giant Troll Is Scared Of Some Dumb Eighth Grader?”

What’s a good coming-of-age movie without a bully to defeat? Leslie and Jess both have enemies at school, in the form of Janice and Hogart. While their base instincts might be to just avoid trouble, they use their experiences in Terabithia to help them gain the strength for Jess to stand up to Hogart and Leslie to check on Janice when she was crying.
This shows off the beneficial power of imagination. Jess and Leslie don’t just have an escape from their everyday lives; they are stronger in their normal lives as well. They support each other and draw on the battles they have fought together to stand against any new threats they have to face.
Remembering Lost Loved Ones
“When My Husband Died, People Kept Telling Me Not To Cry. People Kept Trying To Help Me Forget. But I Didn’t Want To Forget.”

After Leslie’s death, Jess gets into a fight with another student who made a cruel comment mocking her death. Jess’s teacher pulls him out of class, but rather than scolding him for fighting, she tries to empathize with his struggles.
When someone is grieving, those around them try to help them by telling them any number of well-meaning but ultimately unhelpful things. Rather than telling Jess that she’s sorry, or any other standard grief sayings, she tells him about her own experience and opens the door for him to share what he needs whenever he’s ready, whether it’s what other people expect or not.
Terabithia’s War Call
“We Rule Terabithia! And Nothing Crushes Us!”

Children often see themselves as powerless, being controlled by their adults and teachers, as well as the bullies among their peers. But by creating and living in Terabithia, Jess and Leslie feel strong and capable of taking on any task that their kingdom needs from them.
Although audiences might wonder why the children were left unsupervised often enough to create an entire world where they felt valuable, many children live with similar circumstances in the real world. This film gives them somewhere to turn when they feel powerless, and a battle cry to shout in their minds when they feel defeated.
Remembering The Best Of Those We’ve Lost
“She Brought You Something Special When She Came Here, Didn’t She? That’s What You Hold Onto. That’s How You Keep Her Alive.”

It can be hard to hold onto the good parts of someone who has died without being crushed under the weight of everything that has been lost. Though Jess’s dad is often an antagonist in Bridge to Terabithia, he does offer Jess important advice on how to approach his grief and cope with the loss of Leslie.
Pretending that there was never a person to lose is not the way. Embracing all of the good that they gave you is, which leads Jess to build a safer passage to Terabithia and share it with his sister, to keep the magic of imagination alive.

#Bridge #Terabithia #Movies #QuotesNEXT #Childrens #Movies #Cry


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