Entertainment

Chip ‘N Dale: Rescue Rangers Review – Disney+ Reboot Shows Promise, Falls Short

Kiki Layne in Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers

It’s revealed early on in Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers that the missing animated characters are victims of a process known as “bootlegging,” which is one of the more clever parts of Dan Gregor and Doug Mand’s screenplay. The surprisingly terrifying concept plays with the various animation styles present in the film. Between hand-drawn and CGI, Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers seems to put the entire history of animation on display, and as a showcase for the whole industry, it’s an impressive one. The combination of live-action and animation, perhaps best highlighted in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, lends itself to fun visuals, and Schaffer melds them together well — perhaps too well.

Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers truly is bursting at the seams with cameos, and not just of the Disney variety. There are some characters found in here that will make viewers’ jaws drop, including one recurring figure who comes from a major non-Disney franchise and was the subject of a lot of online jokes. In some ways, Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers gets overwhelming in its desire to stuff as many meta jokes and references into the hour-and-a-half-long runtime. This is a movie that has more cameos than Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness was rumored to have. There are even some pointed remarks about reboots, but ultimately, this isn’t a movie that has much to say about Hollywood’s current obsession with mining old IP for new content. Gregor and Mand find some glimmers of that, but Rescue Rangers soon becomes more focused on the bootlegging mystery. When it does that, it becomes a far more conventional movie, albeit with some fun noir flourishes.

Voices of Andy Samberg and John Mulaney in Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers

Still, when it comes to casting a comedic duo, one can’t do much better than Samberg and Mulaney. Of the two, it’s Mulaney who actually has to be the more serious one, as Chip is far more pragmatic and cautious than Dale. Because of that, Mulaney isn’t really able to flex his skill as the hilarious performer he is, which makes his role as Chip a bit disappointing. Samberg, though, brings the carefree energy he embodied so well on Brooklyn Nine-Nine to his vocal performance as Dale and finds success. Together, Samberg and Mulaney are a believable pair of longtime friends. The rest of the voice cast includes Will Arnett (as Peter Pan) and J.K. Simmons (as Captain Putty), as well as some returning members of the original Rescue Rangers crew. Layne gets the biggest human role as Ellie, and while she definitely is a talented performer, her character isn’t given a lot of depth, leaving her a bit stranded amid the animated antics.

Disney enthusiasts will no doubt get a kick out of a spotting every reference and watching the shining studio take a few shots at its own library. And to be sure, there are parts of Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers that offer some amusement and chuckles. For example, a visit to a neighborhood known as the Uncanny Valley provides an opportunity for some sly CGI commentary. Too often, though, the creativity gets bogged down beneath the references and standard mystery. Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers still makes for an entertaining viewing experience, just as long as one doesn’t mind the extra baggage.

Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers begins streaming on Disney+ Friday, May 20. It is 97 minutes long and rated PG for mild action and rude/suggestive humor.

Our Rating:

2.5 out of 5 (Fairly Good)


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Chip ‘N Dale: Rescue Rangers Review – Disney+ Reboot Shows Promise, Falls Short

Kiki Layne in Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers
It’s revealed early on in Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers that the missing animated characters are victims of a process known as “bootlegging,” which is one of the more clever parts of Dan Gregor and Doug Mand’s screenplay. The surprisingly terrifying concept plays with the various animation styles present in the film. Between hand-drawn and CGI, Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers seems to put the entire history of animation on display, and as a showcase for the whole industry, it’s an impressive one. The combination of live-action and animation, perhaps best highlighted in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, lends itself to fun visuals, and Schaffer melds them together well — perhaps too well.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers truly is bursting at the seams with cameos, and not just of the Disney variety. There are some characters found in here that will make viewers’ jaws drop, including one recurring figure who comes from a major non-Disney franchise and was the subject of a lot of online jokes. In some ways, Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers gets overwhelming in its desire to stuff as many meta jokes and references into the hour-and-a-half-long runtime. This is a movie that has more cameos than Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness was rumored to have. There are even some pointed remarks about reboots, but ultimately, this isn’t a movie that has much to say about Hollywood’s current obsession with mining old IP for new content. Gregor and Mand find some glimmers of that, but Rescue Rangers soon becomes more focused on the bootlegging mystery. When it does that, it becomes a far more conventional movie, albeit with some fun noir flourishes.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

Voices of Andy Samberg and John Mulaney in Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers
Still, when it comes to casting a comedic duo, one can’t do much better than Samberg and Mulaney. Of the two, it’s Mulaney who actually has to be the more serious one, as Chip is far more pragmatic and cautious than Dale. Because of that, Mulaney isn’t really able to flex his skill as the hilarious performer he is, which makes his role as Chip a bit disappointing. Samberg, though, brings the carefree energy he embodied so well on Brooklyn Nine-Nine to his vocal performance as Dale and finds success. Together, Samberg and Mulaney are a believable pair of longtime friends. The rest of the voice cast includes Will Arnett (as Peter Pan) and J.K. Simmons (as Captain Putty), as well as some returning members of the original Rescue Rangers crew. Layne gets the biggest human role as Ellie, and while she definitely is a talented performer, her character isn’t given a lot of depth, leaving her a bit stranded amid the animated antics.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

Disney enthusiasts will no doubt get a kick out of a spotting every reference and watching the shining studio take a few shots at its own library. And to be sure, there are parts of Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers that offer some amusement and chuckles. For example, a visit to a neighborhood known as the Uncanny Valley provides an opportunity for some sly CGI commentary. Too often, though, the creativity gets bogged down beneath the references and standard mystery. Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers still makes for an entertaining viewing experience, just as long as one doesn’t mind the extra baggage.

Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers begins streaming on Disney+ Friday, May 20. It is 97 minutes long and rated PG for mild action and rude/suggestive humor.

Our Rating:
2.5 out of 5 (Fairly Good)

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-0’); });

#Chip #Dale #Rescue #Rangers #Review #Disney #Reboot #Shows #Promise #Falls #Short

Chip ‘N Dale: Rescue Rangers Review – Disney+ Reboot Shows Promise, Falls Short

Kiki Layne in Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers
It’s revealed early on in Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers that the missing animated characters are victims of a process known as “bootlegging,” which is one of the more clever parts of Dan Gregor and Doug Mand’s screenplay. The surprisingly terrifying concept plays with the various animation styles present in the film. Between hand-drawn and CGI, Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers seems to put the entire history of animation on display, and as a showcase for the whole industry, it’s an impressive one. The combination of live-action and animation, perhaps best highlighted in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, lends itself to fun visuals, and Schaffer melds them together well — perhaps too well.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers truly is bursting at the seams with cameos, and not just of the Disney variety. There are some characters found in here that will make viewers’ jaws drop, including one recurring figure who comes from a major non-Disney franchise and was the subject of a lot of online jokes. In some ways, Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers gets overwhelming in its desire to stuff as many meta jokes and references into the hour-and-a-half-long runtime. This is a movie that has more cameos than Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness was rumored to have. There are even some pointed remarks about reboots, but ultimately, this isn’t a movie that has much to say about Hollywood’s current obsession with mining old IP for new content. Gregor and Mand find some glimmers of that, but Rescue Rangers soon becomes more focused on the bootlegging mystery. When it does that, it becomes a far more conventional movie, albeit with some fun noir flourishes.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

Voices of Andy Samberg and John Mulaney in Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers
Still, when it comes to casting a comedic duo, one can’t do much better than Samberg and Mulaney. Of the two, it’s Mulaney who actually has to be the more serious one, as Chip is far more pragmatic and cautious than Dale. Because of that, Mulaney isn’t really able to flex his skill as the hilarious performer he is, which makes his role as Chip a bit disappointing. Samberg, though, brings the carefree energy he embodied so well on Brooklyn Nine-Nine to his vocal performance as Dale and finds success. Together, Samberg and Mulaney are a believable pair of longtime friends. The rest of the voice cast includes Will Arnett (as Peter Pan) and J.K. Simmons (as Captain Putty), as well as some returning members of the original Rescue Rangers crew. Layne gets the biggest human role as Ellie, and while she definitely is a talented performer, her character isn’t given a lot of depth, leaving her a bit stranded amid the animated antics.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

Disney enthusiasts will no doubt get a kick out of a spotting every reference and watching the shining studio take a few shots at its own library. And to be sure, there are parts of Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers that offer some amusement and chuckles. For example, a visit to a neighborhood known as the Uncanny Valley provides an opportunity for some sly CGI commentary. Too often, though, the creativity gets bogged down beneath the references and standard mystery. Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers still makes for an entertaining viewing experience, just as long as one doesn’t mind the extra baggage.

Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers begins streaming on Disney+ Friday, May 20. It is 97 minutes long and rated PG for mild action and rude/suggestive humor.

Our Rating:
2.5 out of 5 (Fairly Good)

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-0’); });

#Chip #Dale #Rescue #Rangers #Review #Disney #Reboot #Shows #Promise #Falls #Short


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