Comis

Even Marvel Admits They’re Tired of The Multiverse

WARNING: Contains spoilers for . Spider Gwen: Gwenverse #2!

Marvel is pushing this even further multiverse In both movies and cartoons — but even they seem tired of the concept. The ability to put together multiple versions of the same character from different worlds creates a diverse and interesting story concept and is a great tool for a team of superheroes. But the concept Spider Gwen: Gwenverse #2 Featuring an exchange between two living versions of Gwen Stacy that most fans will be very familiar with when discussing stake (or lack thereof) in a Multiverse-based story.

The concept of “multiverse” is neither new nor limited to cartoons. The term was first used in a lecture by Erwin Shrödinger in 1952, who explained that the principle of quantum superposition allows for the possibility of multiple simultaneous stories at the same time and essentially describes multiple universes except for names. The DC readership has been fairly familiar with the concept of the multiverse since the company revealed that the two versions of Flash, Jay Garrick and Barry Allen, coexist on different dimensions. lightning of two worlds; 1986 Infinite Earth Crisis I’ve expanded on this one topic to tell the story of an infinite multiverse. Marvel’s multiple universes also exist, but their stories typically include very different transformations of reality. if… ? cartoon series and accompanying Disney+ series).

where Spider Gwen: Gwenverse In the series, Spider-Gwen (aka Ghost Spider) embarks on an adventure through multiple universes along with several other variants of Gwen Stacy. Thorgwen, Gwendonyn Janus is a version of Thor wielding the Mjolnir hammer. Gwen Rogers is a shielded Captain America variant. Gwen Howlett is a version of Gwen transformed into Wolverine and more. As Gwens fights, Captain America (the comic book lover in this real world) says so. “I never liked the alternate universe edition of Captain America. It felt like it had no inserts. But it’s a lot different when it’s inside.”

This is one of the key issues whenever Marvel decides to do a multiverse story. 616 A story far from space has little impact on the main story. You can skip the multiverse connection and you can hardly miss character development. A standalone story is better, but this is another matter. There is a “real” Captain America, so why would readers want to invest in an alternate version of Captain America? For the most part, multiverse stories are considered a detour rather than a must-read. Marvel’s multiverse stories are often filled with characters that combine two existing heroes into one, but the resulting characters aren’t necessarily new or interesting.

between Devil’s Lane: Superior Four, Avengers Forever, GwenverseMultiple stories centered around Miles Morales becoming a different character, Marvel bets it all on the multiverse (both the comics and the MCU: see Spider-Man: No Way Home And Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness For more evidence on this front). Multiverse isn’t necessarily a bad concept, but if it’s not executed properly or lacks a moral focus for the story, it risks becoming mediocre and alienating the audience. that multiverse It remains here, but we need to influence the main version of the character as well.


More information

Even Marvel Admits They’re Tired of The Multiverse

Warning: contains spoilers for Spider-Gwen: Gwenverse #2!
Marvel continues to push the Multiverse in a major way in both movies and comics – but even they appear to be tired of the concept. The ability to bring multiple versions of the same character from different universes together makes for a variety of interesting story concepts, and is admittedly an excellent vehicle for superhero team-ups. But the concept may have hit a creative wall, as Spider-Gwen: Gwenverse #2 contains an exchange between two living versions of Gwen Stacy that most fans will find quite familiar when discussing the stakes (0r lack thereof) in multiverse-based stories.
The concept of a “multiverse” is not new, nor limited to comics. The term was first used in 1952 during a lecture by Erwin Shrödinger, in which he explained that the principle of quantum superposition allowed the possibility of multiple simultaneous histories to occur at the same time, essentially describing the multiverse in all but name. The DC readership is quite familiar with the Multiverse concept ever since the company revealed that Jay Garrick and Barry Allen – two versions of the Flash – existed simultaneously in different dimensions in Flash of Two Worlds; 1986’s Crisis on Infinite Earths expanded upon that one issue to tell a story about the infinite multiverse. Marvel’s multiverse exists as well, but their stories usually involve variants in different realities entirely (see the What If…? line of comics and accompanying Disney+ series).

In the Spider-Gwen: Gwenverse series, Spider-Gwen (also known as Ghost Spider) embarks on an adventure through the multiverse along with multiple other Gwen Stacy variants. Thorgwen, Gwendonyn Janus, is a version of Thor who wields the hammer Mjolnir; Gwen Rogers is a Captain America variant complete with shield; Gwen Howlett is a version of Gwen who became Wolverine, etc. As the Gwens fight, Captain America (who is something of a comic book aficionado in this reality) says “I never liked the alternate universe issues of Captain America. Felt like there were no stakes. But it’s a lot different when you’re in it.”

This is one of the core problems whenever Marvel elects to tell a multiverse story. Tales that take place far away from the 616 universe rarely impact the main storyline – one can skip multiverse tie-ins and rarely miss out on character development. Self-contained stories fare better, but this is another problem: why would readers want to invest themselves in alternate versions of Captain America when the “real” Captain America is present? More often than not, multiverse tales are seen as detours rather than essential reader material. Marvel’s multiverse stories are often full of characters that combine two existing heroes into one – but the resulting character isn’t necessarily new or interesting.
Between Devil’s Reign: Superior Four, Avengers Forever, Gwenverse, and multiple stories centered around Miles Morales becoming other characters, Marvel is betting everything on the multiverse (in both comics and the MCU: see Spider-Man: No Way Home and Doctor Strange in The Multiverse of Madness for more proof on that front). The Multiverse is not necessarily a bad concept, but when executed poorly or without a moral at the center of the story, it becomes commonplace and runs the risk of turning off audiences. The Multiverse is here to stay, but it must have an impact on the main versions of characters as well.

#Marvel #Admits #Theyre #Tired #Multiverse

Even Marvel Admits They’re Tired of The Multiverse

Warning: contains spoilers for Spider-Gwen: Gwenverse #2!
Marvel continues to push the Multiverse in a major way in both movies and comics – but even they appear to be tired of the concept. The ability to bring multiple versions of the same character from different universes together makes for a variety of interesting story concepts, and is admittedly an excellent vehicle for superhero team-ups. But the concept may have hit a creative wall, as Spider-Gwen: Gwenverse #2 contains an exchange between two living versions of Gwen Stacy that most fans will find quite familiar when discussing the stakes (0r lack thereof) in multiverse-based stories.
The concept of a “multiverse” is not new, nor limited to comics. The term was first used in 1952 during a lecture by Erwin Shrödinger, in which he explained that the principle of quantum superposition allowed the possibility of multiple simultaneous histories to occur at the same time, essentially describing the multiverse in all but name. The DC readership is quite familiar with the Multiverse concept ever since the company revealed that Jay Garrick and Barry Allen – two versions of the Flash – existed simultaneously in different dimensions in Flash of Two Worlds; 1986’s Crisis on Infinite Earths expanded upon that one issue to tell a story about the infinite multiverse. Marvel’s multiverse exists as well, but their stories usually involve variants in different realities entirely (see the What If…? line of comics and accompanying Disney+ series).

In the Spider-Gwen: Gwenverse series, Spider-Gwen (also known as Ghost Spider) embarks on an adventure through the multiverse along with multiple other Gwen Stacy variants. Thorgwen, Gwendonyn Janus, is a version of Thor who wields the hammer Mjolnir; Gwen Rogers is a Captain America variant complete with shield; Gwen Howlett is a version of Gwen who became Wolverine, etc. As the Gwens fight, Captain America (who is something of a comic book aficionado in this reality) says “I never liked the alternate universe issues of Captain America. Felt like there were no stakes. But it’s a lot different when you’re in it.”

This is one of the core problems whenever Marvel elects to tell a multiverse story. Tales that take place far away from the 616 universe rarely impact the main storyline – one can skip multiverse tie-ins and rarely miss out on character development. Self-contained stories fare better, but this is another problem: why would readers want to invest themselves in alternate versions of Captain America when the “real” Captain America is present? More often than not, multiverse tales are seen as detours rather than essential reader material. Marvel’s multiverse stories are often full of characters that combine two existing heroes into one – but the resulting character isn’t necessarily new or interesting.
Between Devil’s Reign: Superior Four, Avengers Forever, Gwenverse, and multiple stories centered around Miles Morales becoming other characters, Marvel is betting everything on the multiverse (in both comics and the MCU: see Spider-Man: No Way Home and Doctor Strange in The Multiverse of Madness for more proof on that front). The Multiverse is not necessarily a bad concept, but when executed poorly or without a moral at the center of the story, it becomes commonplace and runs the risk of turning off audiences. The Multiverse is here to stay, but it must have an impact on the main versions of characters as well.

#Marvel #Admits #Theyre #Tired #Multiverse


Synthetic: Vik News

Vik News

Viknews Vietnam specializes in sharing useful knowledge about marriage - family, beauty, motherhood experience, nutritional care during pregnancy, before and after birth, lipstick, royal jelly, home and furniture. (wooden doors, decorative chandeliers, dining tables, kitchen cabinets..)……

Trả lời

Email của bạn sẽ không được hiển thị công khai. Các trường bắt buộc được đánh dấu *

Back to top button