Tech

How Much Does It Cost to Charge an EV?

It depends on where you are and what type of charger you are using.

Like conventional vehicles, electric vehicles (EVs) need fuel to drive. The only difference is that the EV “fuel” is not liquid fuel delivered through a hose, but electrons passed through a charging cable. In any case, knowing how much it will cost to charge an electric vehicle is just as important as knowing how much it will cost to refuel a regular vehicle.

A Consumer Reports study found that over 50% of car buyers consider fuel economy as part of their purchasing decision.

Because EVs are so efficient, typically exceeding 100 MPG (miles per gallon), it will be much cheaper to charge an EV than refueling a conventional vehicle with an average fuel economy of only 25 MPG (miles per gallon). Still, there are variables to consider.

Charging an electric vehicle at home

Charging at home is most convenient for most drivers. A recent study by JD Power found that nearly 90% of EV owners charge their EVs at home.

The average EV driver adds $20-30 to their monthly electricity bill, but that average depends on several factors. It costs money to charge an electric car at home.

Check out the calculator below to get an idea of ​​how much it costs to charge an electric car and how it compares to a petrol car.

Here are some key factors to consider, some of which have already been identified above.

  • EVSE – EV supply equipment, commonly referred to as the L2 home charging station, is more efficient than the L1 charging cable supplied with the EV. Depending on the charger’s features, such as power rating and smart features, it can cost between $200 and $1,500. Depending on your installation requirements, your home EVSE installation can add $1,000 or more.
  • Electricity – Electricity rates are calculated in kilowatt-hours (kWh) and the average kWh cost in the United States is 13¢. Electricity costs vary by location, time of day, and government or utility incentives.
  • Fuel efficiency – Electric vehicle fuel consumption is expressed in kWh/100 miles (kilowatt-hours per 100 miles) and is typically 20-30 kWh/100 miles. If the EV battery has a capacity of 50 kWh and consumes 25 kWh/100 miles, the range should be around 200 miles.
  • ride every day – How much you drive also affects the cost of charging an electric vehicle. If you drive 100 miles a day, you will need to recover 100 miles during the night charging cycle.
  • transmission loss – Charging efficiency varies with ambient temperature, battery condition and charger type. With an L2 charger you can expect a transmission loss of 5% to 15%, whereas with a high voltage DC charger it is closer to 99%.

do the math yourself

Assuming a 50kWh battery @ 25kWh/100miles and an average daily commute of 100 miles (about 25kWh) and an average charge of 13¢/kWh at home at night, some basic calculations can go like this:

  • Cost per mile – 13¢/kWh x 25kWh/100 miles = 3.25¢/mile
  • Cost per load – ¢3.25/mx 100mi = $3.25 per day

If the average commute is 100 miles per day, EV charging costs can add up to $70.42 per month. (For reference, this vehicle is still a pure electric vehicle, not a hybrid that uses gasoline.)

Add 15% worst case transmission loss to $80.98 per month. Compare that to a 40mpg hybrid vehicle that costs $3/gal of fuel twice the $162.50 per month, and it’s easy to see how a purely electric vehicle can actually save you money.

EV (BEV) vs PHEV vs FCEV vs Hybrid: What’s the Difference?

how to cut costs

There are ways to further reduce costs. Some utilities or local governments may offer special rates for charging EVs, or lower off-peak electricity rates, usually from midnight to 6 am.

There may be some upfront costs involved, but you can also use solar panels and backup batteries to generate electricity.

How long does it take to charge my electric vehicle?

Charging time can be a big consideration for EV buyers. Because you need to know if you can recharge it at night to restore what you used during the day, or if you need to recharge it at your destination before returning home.

With a few simple calculations, you can find out how much it will cost to charge an electric vehicle on the road.

To do this, you need to know the charging current. That is, it is a low number between the performance of the vehicle and the charging station.

If EVSE can do that for example deliver 8kW and your electric vehicle accept Up to 5kW, 5kW is the maximum charging current. If the EV can accommodate up to 8 kW, but the EVSE can only deliver 5 kW, the maximum charging rate is 5 kW.

Let’s say the EV is able to get the most out of the L2 8kW EVSE in the garage, and you can use the information you already know about the EV to estimate the charging time from the battery capacity or range. For a more accurate estimate, we can assume 90% efficiency by adding the transmission loss.

  • By capacity – 20 kWh ÷ 90% 8 kW = 2.78 hours or 2 hours 47 minutes
  • By range – 25 kWh/100km x 100km ÷ 90% 8kW = 2.78 hours or 2 hours 47 minutes

As the example shows, this is good news because you can restore your daily driving in just a few hours. If you have a smart charger, you can also set it to start charging at 3am and finish charging at 5:45am for your morning coffee.

Charge your electric vehicle on the go

Charging electric vehicles on the go at public charging stations is another matter. Equipment varies and payment methods for station use are different. At work, school or some retail outlets, you can recharge for free at the L2 charging station, a benefit for employees, students or shoppers. Free is good, but you may have to look elsewhere due to limited availability.

The app allows you to access other publicly accessible L2 and L3 charging stations, pay with a credit card, or use NFC. Stations can be subscription-based, pay-as-you-go, or both. Some are billed in minutes, kilowatt hours, or sessions. Knowing the capacity or range you need to charge and how long it will take, you can estimate how much it will cost to charge your electric vehicle when you are away.

EV (BEV) vs PHEV vs FCEV vs Hybrid: What’s the Difference?

For example: You go shopping and find out that you need to charge half of your battery to get home. You can find 95% efficient L2 chargers that can achieve 19.2 kW of charging power in public parking lots, and based on a specific electric vehicle, this process will take around 1.37 hours or 82 minutes. Charging stations charge 6 cents per minute.

  • Charging cost – 82 minutes x 6¢/min = $4.92

As another example, let’s say you’re traveling and find a 99% efficient L3 charger providing up to 300kW of DC fast charging power and you need about 50% of its 50kWh capacity. mile range. The loading time in this case is just over 5 minutes. This L3 charging station costs $1 per minute. (Other stations may charge in kWh (eg 43¢/kWh).)

  • Charge cost – 5 minutes x $1/minute = $5.00
  • Charging cost – 25kWh x 43¢/kWh = $10.75

A charge of almost 1.5 hours with an L2 charger costs about the same as a 5 minute charge with an L3 charger, and may be less.

How to plan a trip with an electric vehicle

Our comparative 40mpg hybrid can only go 66 miles for the same $5.00 no matter where you charge it. Charger availability, time or capacity charges, price increases or subscription offers can affect your final payout price, but the point here is that costs are pretty stable regardless of where you publicly charge.

Idle charges may apply at public charging stations if the vehicle remains connected after charging is complete.

Apps and online calculators are great ways to find and pay for recharges.

In general, charging an electric vehicle can be much cheaper than refueling a conventional vehicle, depending on where you are charging and where you live. Charging at home with an L2 charger is the most economical option in most cases.

Is it better to charge an electric car at home? Or is it better to charge at a public charging station?


More information

How Much Does It Cost to Charge an EV?

It depends on where you are and the type of charger you’re using

Just like conventional vehicles, electric vehicles (EVs) need fuel to run. The only difference is that EV “fuel” is electrons delivered through a charging cable instead of liquid fuel delivered through a hose. In either case, knowing how much it will cost to charge an EV is just as important as knowing how much it will cost to refuel a conventional vehicle.

A Consumer Reports survey revealed that over 50 percent of car shoppers consider fuel economy a significant, even critical, part of their shopping decision.

Because EVs are so efficient, typically over 100 MPGe (miles per gallon equivalent), it’s likely it will cost significantly less to charge an EV than to refuel a conventional vehicle, whose average fuel economy is just 25 MPG (miles per gallon). Still, there are variables to consider.
Charging Your EV at Home

For most drivers, charging at home is the most convenient. Almost 90 percent of EV owners charge their electric vehicles at home, according to a recent J.D. Power study.

The average EV driver will note an extra $20 to $30 tacked onto their utility bill every month, but that average depends on several factors: where you drive, how much you drive, what you drive, and how you drive can all impact how much it will cost you to charge your electric vehicle at home.

To get an idea of how much it will cost to charge an EV, and how that compares to a gasoline car, check out our calculator below:

Here are some key factors to consider, some of which you already figured out above:

EVSE – The electric vehicle supply equipment, usually called a home L2 charging station, is more efficient than the L1 charge cable you got with your EV. Depending on charger capabilities, such as power rating and smart features, this can cost between $200 and $1,500. Depending on installation requirements, this can add over $1,000 to a home EVSE installation.
Electricity – Your electric bill is charged by kilowatt-hours (kWh), and the average kWh costs 13¢ across the United States. Electricity costs vary, depending on location, time of day, and government or utility incentives.
Fuel Economy – Electric vehicle fuel economy is listed in kWh/100 mi (kilowatt-hours per 100 miles), usually 20 to 30 kWh/100 mi. If the EV battery capacity is 50 kWh and uses 25 kWh/100 mi, your range should be roughly 200 miles.
Daily Drive – How much you drive will also impact how much it costs to charge your EV. If you drive 100 miles per day, you’ll need to restore 100 miles during your overnight charge cycle.
Transmission Losses – Charging efficiency varies, depending on ambient temperature, the condition of the battery, and charger type. For L2 chargers, you can expect 5% to 15% transmission losses, while high-voltage DC chargers are closer to 99% efficient.
Doing the Math Yourself

Some basic calculations might go something like this, given a 50-kWh battery using 25 kWh/100 mi, and a 100-mile average daily commute – about 25 kWh – charging at home overnight at the average 13¢/kWh:

Cost Per Mile – 13¢/kWh x 25 kWh/100 mi = 3.25¢/mi
Cost Per Charge – 3.25¢/mi x 100 mi = $3.25 per day

If your average commute is 100 miles per day, your EV recharging costs might amount to $70.42 per month. (Remember, that’s a pure EV and not a hybrid, which still uses gasoline.)

Add in, at worst, 15 percent transmission losses for another $80.98 per month. Compare that to a 40-mpg hybrid vehicle’s whose fuel costs, at $3/gal, would be double that at $162.50 per month, and it’s easy to see how a pure EV can be a true cost savings.

EV (BEV) vs PHEV vs FCEV vs Hybrid: What’s the Difference?
Ways to Reduce Costs

There are ways to reduce your costs even further. Some utilities or local governments may offer special pricing for charging EVs, or you might be able to take advantage of lower off-peak electricity pricing, usually midnight to 6 AM.

Also, solar panels and battery backups allow you to generate your electricity, though there may be some upfront costs associated with them.

How Long Should It Take to Charge My EV?

Charge time can be a massive consideration for EV shoppers because you’ll need to know if you can charge overnight to restore what you used during the day or will need to charge at your destination before returning home.

A few simple calculations will help you figure out how much it will cost to charge an EV on the road.

To do that, you’ll need to know your charge rate: The lower number between your vehicle and the charging station’s capabilities.

For example, if your EVSE can deliver 8 kW and your EV accepts up to 5 kW, 5 kW is your maximum charge rate. Similarly, if your EV accepts up to 8 kW, but your EVSE can only deliver 5 kW, your maximum charge rate will be 5 kW. 

Let’s assume your EV can take full advantage of the L2 8-kW EVSE in your garage and the charge time can be estimated by battery capacity or range using the information we already know about your EV. We’ll need to add in transmission losses for a more accurate estimate so we can assume 90 percent efficiency.

By Capacity – 20 kWh ÷ 90% 8 kW = 2.78 hrs or 2 hours and 47 minutes
By Range – 25 kWh/100 mi x 100 mi ÷ 90% 8 kW = 2.78 hrs or 2 hours and 47 minutes

It’s good information to know because, as you can see in the example, you’ll be able to restore your daily drive in just a few hours. If you have a smart charger, you could even schedule it to start charging at 3 AM to finish by 5:45 AM when your morning coffee is brewing.

Charging Electric Vehicles on the Go

Charging an EV on the road using a public charging station is a different matter. The equipment is different, and there are various ways of paying for station use. At work, school, or some retail locations, you may be able to recharge on an L2 charging station for free, a perk for employees, students, or shoppers. Free is lovely, but limited availability could force you to look elsewhere.

You can access other public-access L2 and L3 charging stations with an app, pay with a credit card or use NFC. Stations might be available on a subscription basis, pay-as-you-go, or both—some charge by the minute, by the kilowatt-hour, or per session. Knowing how much capacity or range you need to charge and how long it should take can help you estimate how much it costs to charge an EV when you’re not at home.

EV (BEV) vs PHEV vs FCEV vs Hybrid: What’s the Difference?

Here’s an example: On a shopping trip, you realize you need to restore half your battery to get back home. In the public parking lot, you find a 95 percent efficiency L2 charger capable of a 19.2 kW charge rate and determine, based on your specific EV, that this process will take about 1.37 hours or 82 minutes. The charging station charges 6¢/min.

Charge Cost – 82 min x 6¢/min = $4.92

Another example: Let’s say you’re on a road trip, and you come across a 99 percent efficiency L3 charger capable of up to 300 kW DC fast-charge rate, and you need to restore 50 percent of your EV’s 50 kWh capacity, about 100 miles range. In this case, your charge time will be just over 5 minutes. This L3 charging station charges $1/min. (Other stations might charge by kWh, such as 43¢/kWh, for example.)

Charge Cost – 5 min x $1/min = $5.00
Charge Cost – 25 kWh x 43¢/kWh = $10.75

You can see how charging nearly an hour and a half on an L2 charger might cost about the same as charging 5 minutes on an L3 charger, and possibly less.

How to Plan a Road Trip With an EV

Our comparison 40-mpg hybrid can only go 66 miles on the same $5.00 no matter where it’s charged. While charger availability, time or capacity charges, surge pricing, or subscription offers can affect the price you pay in the end, the point here is that the cost is fairly stable regardless of where you publicly charge.

Idle fees may be applied at public charging stations if your vehicle remains plugged in after charging finishes.

Apps and online calculators are great ways to locate and pay for recharging.

In general, it can be significantly less expensive to recharge an EV than refuel a conventional vehicle, depending on where you charge and live. Charging at home on an L2 charger is the most economical option in most cases.

Is It Better to Charge My EV at Home or at a Public Charger?

#Cost #Charge

How Much Does It Cost to Charge an EV?

It depends on where you are and the type of charger you’re using

Just like conventional vehicles, electric vehicles (EVs) need fuel to run. The only difference is that EV “fuel” is electrons delivered through a charging cable instead of liquid fuel delivered through a hose. In either case, knowing how much it will cost to charge an EV is just as important as knowing how much it will cost to refuel a conventional vehicle.

A Consumer Reports survey revealed that over 50 percent of car shoppers consider fuel economy a significant, even critical, part of their shopping decision.

Because EVs are so efficient, typically over 100 MPGe (miles per gallon equivalent), it’s likely it will cost significantly less to charge an EV than to refuel a conventional vehicle, whose average fuel economy is just 25 MPG (miles per gallon). Still, there are variables to consider.
Charging Your EV at Home

For most drivers, charging at home is the most convenient. Almost 90 percent of EV owners charge their electric vehicles at home, according to a recent J.D. Power study.

The average EV driver will note an extra $20 to $30 tacked onto their utility bill every month, but that average depends on several factors: where you drive, how much you drive, what you drive, and how you drive can all impact how much it will cost you to charge your electric vehicle at home.

To get an idea of how much it will cost to charge an EV, and how that compares to a gasoline car, check out our calculator below:

Here are some key factors to consider, some of which you already figured out above:

EVSE – The electric vehicle supply equipment, usually called a home L2 charging station, is more efficient than the L1 charge cable you got with your EV. Depending on charger capabilities, such as power rating and smart features, this can cost between $200 and $1,500. Depending on installation requirements, this can add over $1,000 to a home EVSE installation.
Electricity – Your electric bill is charged by kilowatt-hours (kWh), and the average kWh costs 13¢ across the United States. Electricity costs vary, depending on location, time of day, and government or utility incentives.
Fuel Economy – Electric vehicle fuel economy is listed in kWh/100 mi (kilowatt-hours per 100 miles), usually 20 to 30 kWh/100 mi. If the EV battery capacity is 50 kWh and uses 25 kWh/100 mi, your range should be roughly 200 miles.
Daily Drive – How much you drive will also impact how much it costs to charge your EV. If you drive 100 miles per day, you’ll need to restore 100 miles during your overnight charge cycle.
Transmission Losses – Charging efficiency varies, depending on ambient temperature, the condition of the battery, and charger type. For L2 chargers, you can expect 5% to 15% transmission losses, while high-voltage DC chargers are closer to 99% efficient.
Doing the Math Yourself

Some basic calculations might go something like this, given a 50-kWh battery using 25 kWh/100 mi, and a 100-mile average daily commute – about 25 kWh – charging at home overnight at the average 13¢/kWh:

Cost Per Mile – 13¢/kWh x 25 kWh/100 mi = 3.25¢/mi
Cost Per Charge – 3.25¢/mi x 100 mi = $3.25 per day

If your average commute is 100 miles per day, your EV recharging costs might amount to $70.42 per month. (Remember, that’s a pure EV and not a hybrid, which still uses gasoline.)

Add in, at worst, 15 percent transmission losses for another $80.98 per month. Compare that to a 40-mpg hybrid vehicle’s whose fuel costs, at $3/gal, would be double that at $162.50 per month, and it’s easy to see how a pure EV can be a true cost savings.

EV (BEV) vs PHEV vs FCEV vs Hybrid: What’s the Difference?
Ways to Reduce Costs

There are ways to reduce your costs even further. Some utilities or local governments may offer special pricing for charging EVs, or you might be able to take advantage of lower off-peak electricity pricing, usually midnight to 6 AM.

Also, solar panels and battery backups allow you to generate your electricity, though there may be some upfront costs associated with them.

How Long Should It Take to Charge My EV?

Charge time can be a massive consideration for EV shoppers because you’ll need to know if you can charge overnight to restore what you used during the day or will need to charge at your destination before returning home.

A few simple calculations will help you figure out how much it will cost to charge an EV on the road.

To do that, you’ll need to know your charge rate: The lower number between your vehicle and the charging station’s capabilities.

For example, if your EVSE can deliver 8 kW and your EV accepts up to 5 kW, 5 kW is your maximum charge rate. Similarly, if your EV accepts up to 8 kW, but your EVSE can only deliver 5 kW, your maximum charge rate will be 5 kW. 

Let’s assume your EV can take full advantage of the L2 8-kW EVSE in your garage and the charge time can be estimated by battery capacity or range using the information we already know about your EV. We’ll need to add in transmission losses for a more accurate estimate so we can assume 90 percent efficiency.

By Capacity – 20 kWh ÷ 90% 8 kW = 2.78 hrs or 2 hours and 47 minutes
By Range – 25 kWh/100 mi x 100 mi ÷ 90% 8 kW = 2.78 hrs or 2 hours and 47 minutes

It’s good information to know because, as you can see in the example, you’ll be able to restore your daily drive in just a few hours. If you have a smart charger, you could even schedule it to start charging at 3 AM to finish by 5:45 AM when your morning coffee is brewing.

Charging Electric Vehicles on the Go

Charging an EV on the road using a public charging station is a different matter. The equipment is different, and there are various ways of paying for station use. At work, school, or some retail locations, you may be able to recharge on an L2 charging station for free, a perk for employees, students, or shoppers. Free is lovely, but limited availability could force you to look elsewhere.

You can access other public-access L2 and L3 charging stations with an app, pay with a credit card or use NFC. Stations might be available on a subscription basis, pay-as-you-go, or both—some charge by the minute, by the kilowatt-hour, or per session. Knowing how much capacity or range you need to charge and how long it should take can help you estimate how much it costs to charge an EV when you’re not at home.

EV (BEV) vs PHEV vs FCEV vs Hybrid: What’s the Difference?

Here’s an example: On a shopping trip, you realize you need to restore half your battery to get back home. In the public parking lot, you find a 95 percent efficiency L2 charger capable of a 19.2 kW charge rate and determine, based on your specific EV, that this process will take about 1.37 hours or 82 minutes. The charging station charges 6¢/min.

Charge Cost – 82 min x 6¢/min = $4.92

Another example: Let’s say you’re on a road trip, and you come across a 99 percent efficiency L3 charger capable of up to 300 kW DC fast-charge rate, and you need to restore 50 percent of your EV’s 50 kWh capacity, about 100 miles range. In this case, your charge time will be just over 5 minutes. This L3 charging station charges $1/min. (Other stations might charge by kWh, such as 43¢/kWh, for example.)

Charge Cost – 5 min x $1/min = $5.00
Charge Cost – 25 kWh x 43¢/kWh = $10.75

You can see how charging nearly an hour and a half on an L2 charger might cost about the same as charging 5 minutes on an L3 charger, and possibly less.

How to Plan a Road Trip With an EV

Our comparison 40-mpg hybrid can only go 66 miles on the same $5.00 no matter where it’s charged. While charger availability, time or capacity charges, surge pricing, or subscription offers can affect the price you pay in the end, the point here is that the cost is fairly stable regardless of where you publicly charge.

Idle fees may be applied at public charging stations if your vehicle remains plugged in after charging finishes.

Apps and online calculators are great ways to locate and pay for recharging.

In general, it can be significantly less expensive to recharge an EV than refuel a conventional vehicle, depending on where you charge and live. Charging at home on an L2 charger is the most economical option in most cases.

Is It Better to Charge My EV at Home or at a Public Charger?

#Cost #Charge


Synthetic: Vik News

Vik News

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