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How to do a single-arm dumbbell row

Strong back muscles may not be as desirable as your six pack abs or chiseled arm muscles, but there are many benefits to developing back strength. Strong back muscles help improve posture, reduce back pain, and stabilize the spine.

But if you’re still working out at home, or if you’re a beginner and have a hard time doing pull-ups, there’s good news for you. Dumbbell rows are a great alternative. One-arm row using dumbbells stimulates not only the back muscles, but also the shoulders, arms, and core. In other words, it is a good compound exercise for days when you want to train the upper body.

But how do you do a one-arm dumbbell row and how can you modify your movements to make it easier or more challenging? Read on to learn more about mastering dumbbell rows. Looking for more workout motivation? we found them good exercise to strengthen the backthat best abs workout You can do it anywhere. Best Exercises to Target Your Arm Muscles with Weight Only.

One Arm Dumbbell Rows

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

How to do one arm dumbbell row

You will need at least one dumbbell to do one-arm dumbbell rows. If you’re looking for home fitness equipment, we’ve found it best adjustable dumbbells You can do all your weightlifting exercises here.

For a one-arm dumbbell row, you’ll need something you can lean on, like a chair, box, or the side of your trainer. Place dumbbells on the sides of the platform and begin by kneeling on a bench with your left leg and right hand so your upper body is parallel to the floor. Reach out and pick up a dumbbell with your right hand. Keep the grip neutral with your palms facing your body and keep your arms outstretched. Slowly and in a controlled manner, bring the dumbbells to your chest and raise your elbows. Movements should be made in the back and shoulder muscles, not the arms. Pause at the top of the motion before lowering the barbell back to the starting position. Do all reps with one arm before switching to the other arm.

Advantages of One Arm Dumbbell Rows

Although there are many different row variations, the one-arm row is better for the back than the bent-over barbell row, because working one arm simultaneously allows you to focus on the muscles you want to target during the workout. Exercising one side of the body at a time also emphasizes the imbalance you need to work out. The one-arm row with dumbbells also allows for a wider range of motion than the bentover row.

A one-arm row works the muscles in the upper and lower back, as well as the shoulders and biceps in the arm. This movement also targets the abdomen and buttocks, with the middle part stabilizing the body during the movement.

Dumbbell row variants to try

If the one-arm dumbbell row is too difficult, practice the movement with a lighter weight to build up arm strength and ensure proper posture. Do not shake during operation. Your body should be stable on the bench and you should adjust it on your shoulders, not your arms.

If you’re looking for a more challenging variation, try one-arm dumbbell rows in a symmetrical position with your legs off the bench. To do this, perform the row on the bench with one hand, facing a bench or surface and bending your hips. This will force your core muscles to work harder to stabilize your body.

If you have dumbbells, you can also do dumbbell rows with both arms. To do this exercise, start with your feet shoulder-width apart and bend your hips forward while keeping your back straight. Your torso should form a 45 degree angle with the floor. Grasp your shoulder blades and simultaneously raise the dumbbells until they reach waist level, then lower them back to the starting position.


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How to do a single-arm dumbbell row

While strong back muscles might not be as desirable as a six-pack, or chiselled arm muscles, there are a number of benefits to working on your back strength. Strong back muscles can help improve your posture, reduce back pain, and help secure the spine. 
Yet if you’re still working out from home, or you’re a beginner and find pull-ups daunting, we’ve got good news — dumbbell rows are a brilliant alternative. As well as targeting the muscles in the back, a single-arm dumbbell row hits your shoulders, your arm muscles, and your core. In other words, it’s a brilliant compound exercise on days when you’re looking to work your upper body. 
But how do you do a single-arm dumbbell row and how can you modify the move to make it easier or more challenging? Read on to find out more about mastering the dumbbell row. Looking for more workout motivation? We’ve found the best exercises to strengthen your back, the best ab workouts you can do from anywhere, and one of the best exercises for targeting your arm muscles using just your bodyweight. 

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
How to do a single-arm dumbbell row
To do a single-arm dumbbell row, you’ll need at least one dumbbell. If you’re shopping for gym equipment to use at home, we’ve found the best adjustable dumbbells for all your weightlifting workouts here. 
For a single-arm dumbbell row, you’ll need something to lean on, like a chair, box, or just the side of a coach. Start by placing a dumbbell on the side of your platform, and kneel your left leg and right hand on the bench, so that your upper body is parallel to the ground. Reach down and pick up the dumbbell with your right hand. Keep the grip neutral, so that your palm is facing your body, and keep your arm outstretched. Slowly, and with control, bring the dumbbell up towards your chest, hinging at the elbow. The movement should come from your back and shoulder muscles, not from your arm. Pause at the top of the movement, before lowering the dumbbell back to your starting position. Do all your reps on one arm before you switch to the other side. 

The benefits of a single-arm dumbbell row 
There are a number of different row variations, but the single-arm row is better for working your back than the bent-over barbell row, as working on one arm at a time allows you to focus on the muscles targeted during the exercise. Working one side of the body at a time also highlights imbalances you need to work on. What’s more, the single-arm row with a dumbbell allows for a greater range of motion than bent-over rows. 
A single-arm row works the muscles in the upper and lower back, as well as the shoulders and biceps in the arm. The move also targets your abdominal muscles and your hips, as your mid-section works to stabilize your body during the move.
Dumbbell row variations to try 
If single-arm dumbbell rows feel too difficult, try practicing the movement with a lower weight to work on your arm strength and ensure you’re getting the form right. Don’t rock during the movement — your body should be still on the bench, and you should be rowing from your shoulder, not your arm. 
If you’re looking for some more challenging variations, remove your legs from the bench and try a symmetrical stance single-arm dumbbell row. To do this, stand facing the bench or surface and hinge at the hips to perform the row with just one hand on the bench. This forces your core muscles to work harder to stabilize your body. 
If you have a pair of dumbbells, you can also try doing a dumbbell row with both arms. For this exercise, start with your feet shoulder-width apart and hinge forward at your hips, keeping your back straight. Your torso should be at a 45-degree angle to the floor. Squeeze your shoulder blades and bring the dumbbells up in unison until they reach waist height, before lowering them back to the starting position. 

#singlearm #dumbbell #row

How to do a single-arm dumbbell row

While strong back muscles might not be as desirable as a six-pack, or chiselled arm muscles, there are a number of benefits to working on your back strength. Strong back muscles can help improve your posture, reduce back pain, and help secure the spine. 
Yet if you’re still working out from home, or you’re a beginner and find pull-ups daunting, we’ve got good news — dumbbell rows are a brilliant alternative. As well as targeting the muscles in the back, a single-arm dumbbell row hits your shoulders, your arm muscles, and your core. In other words, it’s a brilliant compound exercise on days when you’re looking to work your upper body. 
But how do you do a single-arm dumbbell row and how can you modify the move to make it easier or more challenging? Read on to find out more about mastering the dumbbell row. Looking for more workout motivation? We’ve found the best exercises to strengthen your back, the best ab workouts you can do from anywhere, and one of the best exercises for targeting your arm muscles using just your bodyweight. 

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
How to do a single-arm dumbbell row
To do a single-arm dumbbell row, you’ll need at least one dumbbell. If you’re shopping for gym equipment to use at home, we’ve found the best adjustable dumbbells for all your weightlifting workouts here. 
For a single-arm dumbbell row, you’ll need something to lean on, like a chair, box, or just the side of a coach. Start by placing a dumbbell on the side of your platform, and kneel your left leg and right hand on the bench, so that your upper body is parallel to the ground. Reach down and pick up the dumbbell with your right hand. Keep the grip neutral, so that your palm is facing your body, and keep your arm outstretched. Slowly, and with control, bring the dumbbell up towards your chest, hinging at the elbow. The movement should come from your back and shoulder muscles, not from your arm. Pause at the top of the movement, before lowering the dumbbell back to your starting position. Do all your reps on one arm before you switch to the other side. 

The benefits of a single-arm dumbbell row 
There are a number of different row variations, but the single-arm row is better for working your back than the bent-over barbell row, as working on one arm at a time allows you to focus on the muscles targeted during the exercise. Working one side of the body at a time also highlights imbalances you need to work on. What’s more, the single-arm row with a dumbbell allows for a greater range of motion than bent-over rows. 
A single-arm row works the muscles in the upper and lower back, as well as the shoulders and biceps in the arm. The move also targets your abdominal muscles and your hips, as your mid-section works to stabilize your body during the move.
Dumbbell row variations to try 
If single-arm dumbbell rows feel too difficult, try practicing the movement with a lower weight to work on your arm strength and ensure you’re getting the form right. Don’t rock during the movement — your body should be still on the bench, and you should be rowing from your shoulder, not your arm. 
If you’re looking for some more challenging variations, remove your legs from the bench and try a symmetrical stance single-arm dumbbell row. To do this, stand facing the bench or surface and hinge at the hips to perform the row with just one hand on the bench. This forces your core muscles to work harder to stabilize your body. 
If you have a pair of dumbbells, you can also try doing a dumbbell row with both arms. For this exercise, start with your feet shoulder-width apart and hinge forward at your hips, keeping your back straight. Your torso should be at a 45-degree angle to the floor. Squeeze your shoulder blades and bring the dumbbells up in unison until they reach waist height, before lowering them back to the starting position. 

#singlearm #dumbbell #row


Synthetic: Vik News

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