News

How to repot succulents in 7 simple steps

knowledge How to care for succulents Knowing how to transplant a succulent is another matter. If you’re a fan of these cute little houseplants, you’ll already know that they are long-lived but require some maintenance. This is especially true if it has grown more than potted plants or if the soil has been changed for several years.

It may sound like a dreadful task, but it’s important to take the time to keep your succulents healthy and thriving. It doesn’t take long and the result is worth it. Even if it’s your first time, don’t worry. We will explain exactly what you need to do and provide tips and tricks to help you do it. Here’s how to grow succulents.

If air plants are more important to you, check out our guide to caring for air plants.

How to grow succulents

what you will need

bigger flowerpot

moist soil

Garden Gloves (Optional)

hammer (optional)

We recommend watering your succulents a few days in advance, as they need to be semi-hydrated before repotting. Dead leaves should also be removed before repotting.

One. First of all you should Prepare a new home for succulents. Find a pot that is slightly larger than your current one. You need something about 20% larger in both width and height. Terracotta pots with drainage holes are commonly used in these 6-inch clay pots ($27.99, Amazon).

Terracotta Pot Set

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

2. Place a small stone over the hole in the bottom of the new pot. – Helps with drainage. You can also cover it using a piece of pottery from a broken pot.

three. now, Fill the new pot 3/4 full with succulent soil. It is important not to use regular compost as it is too dense and does not drain quickly. There are also cacti-specific soils, so choose the soil that best suits your succulents.

4. The next step is get rid of your succulents Currently in the pot. It can get messy, so it’s a good idea to lay out the newspaper or do it outside. Check the bottom of the pot first to see if the roots have grown. If so, you should release it from their grasp, but be careful.

cactus out of the pot

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

now, Tilt the flower box to the side, Grasp the stem of the succulent (be sure to wear gloves when handling the cactus) and shake to check if the succulent has loosened. You may need to tap the bottom of the pot a few times to encourage it. Be gentle, but be consistent until resolved. If your succulents absolutely refuse to break, you can always smash the old pot with a hammer. This is better for the roots of succulents, but at the expense of the pot.

5. Now that the succulents are out of the pot, there may be some soil mixed with the roots. Wipe off as much as possible. It can tickle the roots. Separate the old earth. If the roots appear tangled and tied, try to loosen them, but be very gentle. You can also trim the roots at this stage if they have grown too long.

Cactus lying on bare hands

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

6. now Place the succulents carefully on the floor. in a new pot. Depending on your height, you may want to dig a shallow hole. holding it with one hand, Fill the pot with more soil mixture. until the roots are completely covered.

However, make sure that the soil does not come into contact with the leaves. It can rot. Also, do not overfill the pot with the soil mixture. Only when you try to water the succulents you will mess up!

Succulents planted in fresh soil

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

7. press the floor lightly compress it.

There is a new home where your succulents will grow. In general, wait a week before watering again.

When should I move succulents?

Repotting should always be done just before the growing season of succulents (usually early spring or autumn). Check your succulents type to see what type you are. Repotting should be avoided during summer or winter when succulents are dormant. In this case, there may be more harm than good.

Signs that your succulents may use pots include:

  • It’s getting too big for his pot – Exceeding the available space will cause roots to grow in the drain.
  • It is a new succulent- If you just bought a succulent, it may be in a temporary plastic pot. She needs a more permanent home, so consider repotting after a week or two.
  • Years have passed – If about two years have passed since the last soil change, succulents can use a fresh batch.
  • The plant looks unhealthy. Your succulents may have had a better day. In such cases, a potted plant can help rejuvenate.
  • Your succulents have been offset – Some succulents also stagger, so you can cut off the roots and repot them to grow a whole new plant.
  • You need to water more often. If you notice that water is draining much faster than it used to, it means you need fresh soil.

Offset removed from succulents

(Image credit: Shutterstock)


For more planting tips, tricks and guides, check out our guide to pruning hydrangeas, caring for orchids, and 5 things to do to prepare for spring in your garden.



More information

How to repot succulents in 7 simple steps

Knowing how to care for succulents is one thing, but knowing how to repot succulents is entirely another. If you’re a fan of these sweet little houseplants, you’ll already know that while they’re durable, they will need some TLC. This is particularly the case if they’ve grown too big for their pot, or it’s been a few years since the soil was changed. 
It may sound like an intimidating task, but it’s essential that you take the time to do this to keep your succulents healthy and thriving. It doesn’t take long, and the results will be worth it. Don’t worry if it’s your first time. We will take you through exactly what you need to do, with tips and tricks to help you along the way. Here’s how to repot succulents. 
If air plants are more your thing, check out our guide on how to care for air plants while you’re at it. 
How to repot succulents 
What you’ll need
A larger plant pot
Succulent soil
Gardening gloves (optional)
Hammer (optional)
It’s worth noting that before you start repotting your succulent, you will need the plant to be semi-hydrated, so it’s a good idea to water it a few days beforehand. You should also trim away any dead leaves prior to repotting.  
1. First of all, you need to prepare your succulent’s new home. Find a pot which is slightly larger than its current one. You’ll need one that’s about 20% bigger in both width and height. Terra-cotta pots with drainage holes are generally a good option, such as this 6 Inch Clay Pot ($27.99, Amazon). 

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
2. Place a small stone over the hole at the base of the new pot — this will help with the drainage. You can also use a clay shard from any broken pots to cover it over.
3. Now, fill the new pot about ¾ full with the succulent soil. It’s important that you do not use regular compost as it’s too dense and won’t drain quickly enough. Dedicated cactus soil also exists, so make sure you choose the soil best suited to your succulent.   
4. The next step is to remove your succulent from its current pot. You might want to lay down some newspaper or do this outside as it can get messy. First, take a look at the underside of the pot to see if any roots have grown through. If they have, you will need to tease them free from their grip, but do so gently.

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
Now, tip the planter on its side, take grip of the succulent at its base (make sure to use gloves if handling a cactus) and give it a wiggle to see if it comes loose. You may have to tap the underside of the pot a few times and give some encouragement. Be gentle, but consistent until it pulls free. If your succulent absolutely refuses to come free, you can always break the old pot with a hammer. This will be better for your succulent’s roots, but you will be sacrificing a pot. 
5. Now your succulent is out of the pot, it may have some soil mixed in with the roots. Try to brush as much of this off as you can. You can ‘tickle’ the roots to help separate the old soil. If the roots appear tangled and tied, try to loosen them, but do so very gently. You can also trim the roots back at this stage if they’ve grown too long. 

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
6. Now place your succulent gently on top of the soil in the new pot. Depending on its height, you may want to dig a shallow hole for it. While using one hand to keep it upright, fill the planter with more soil mix until the roots are fully covered. 
Make sure the soil isn’t touching the leaves though, as this can lead them to rot. Don’t fill with soil mix up to the brim of the pot either — this will just cause a mess when you try to water your succulent!  

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
7. Gently press down on the soil to compact it. 
There you have it, your succulent has a new home it can grow into. As a rule of thumb, wait a week before watering it again. 
When should you repot succulents? 
You should always repot just before your succulent’s growing season, which is usually early spring or fall — double check your succulent type to be sure of which. You should avoid repotting during the summer or winter months as that’s when your succulent will be dormant, in which case you could be doing more harm than good. 
Signs that your succulent could do with repotting include: 
It’s growing too big for its pot — Roots will be growing out of the drainage holes when it’s exceeding the available space. 
It’s a new succulent — If you’ve just bought a succulent home, it might come in a temporary plastic pot. It will need a more permanent home so you should repot it in a week or two. 
It’s been a few years — If it’s been two years or so since you last changed the soil, your succulent could do with a fresh batch.
The plant looks unhealthy — Your succulent may have seen better days, in which case repotting can help revitalize it.
Your succulent has grown offsets — Some succulents will also grow offsets which can be cut away from the base and then repotted to grow a whole new plant. 
You need to water it more often — If you’ve noticed the water is draining much more quickly that it used to, that means fresh soil is required.      

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
For more planting tips, tricks, and how-tos, check out our guides on how to prune hydrangeas, how to care for an orchid, and 5 things to get your garden ready for spring. 

#repot #succulents #simple #steps

How to repot succulents in 7 simple steps

Knowing how to care for succulents is one thing, but knowing how to repot succulents is entirely another. If you’re a fan of these sweet little houseplants, you’ll already know that while they’re durable, they will need some TLC. This is particularly the case if they’ve grown too big for their pot, or it’s been a few years since the soil was changed. 
It may sound like an intimidating task, but it’s essential that you take the time to do this to keep your succulents healthy and thriving. It doesn’t take long, and the results will be worth it. Don’t worry if it’s your first time. We will take you through exactly what you need to do, with tips and tricks to help you along the way. Here’s how to repot succulents. 
If air plants are more your thing, check out our guide on how to care for air plants while you’re at it. 
How to repot succulents 
What you’ll need
A larger plant pot
Succulent soil
Gardening gloves (optional)
Hammer (optional)
It’s worth noting that before you start repotting your succulent, you will need the plant to be semi-hydrated, so it’s a good idea to water it a few days beforehand. You should also trim away any dead leaves prior to repotting.  
1. First of all, you need to prepare your succulent’s new home. Find a pot which is slightly larger than its current one. You’ll need one that’s about 20% bigger in both width and height. Terra-cotta pots with drainage holes are generally a good option, such as this 6 Inch Clay Pot ($27.99, Amazon). 

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
2. Place a small stone over the hole at the base of the new pot — this will help with the drainage. You can also use a clay shard from any broken pots to cover it over.
3. Now, fill the new pot about ¾ full with the succulent soil. It’s important that you do not use regular compost as it’s too dense and won’t drain quickly enough. Dedicated cactus soil also exists, so make sure you choose the soil best suited to your succulent.   
4. The next step is to remove your succulent from its current pot. You might want to lay down some newspaper or do this outside as it can get messy. First, take a look at the underside of the pot to see if any roots have grown through. If they have, you will need to tease them free from their grip, but do so gently.

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
Now, tip the planter on its side, take grip of the succulent at its base (make sure to use gloves if handling a cactus) and give it a wiggle to see if it comes loose. You may have to tap the underside of the pot a few times and give some encouragement. Be gentle, but consistent until it pulls free. If your succulent absolutely refuses to come free, you can always break the old pot with a hammer. This will be better for your succulent’s roots, but you will be sacrificing a pot. 
5. Now your succulent is out of the pot, it may have some soil mixed in with the roots. Try to brush as much of this off as you can. You can ‘tickle’ the roots to help separate the old soil. If the roots appear tangled and tied, try to loosen them, but do so very gently. You can also trim the roots back at this stage if they’ve grown too long. 

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
6. Now place your succulent gently on top of the soil in the new pot. Depending on its height, you may want to dig a shallow hole for it. While using one hand to keep it upright, fill the planter with more soil mix until the roots are fully covered. 
Make sure the soil isn’t touching the leaves though, as this can lead them to rot. Don’t fill with soil mix up to the brim of the pot either — this will just cause a mess when you try to water your succulent!  

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
7. Gently press down on the soil to compact it. 
There you have it, your succulent has a new home it can grow into. As a rule of thumb, wait a week before watering it again. 
When should you repot succulents? 
You should always repot just before your succulent’s growing season, which is usually early spring or fall — double check your succulent type to be sure of which. You should avoid repotting during the summer or winter months as that’s when your succulent will be dormant, in which case you could be doing more harm than good. 
Signs that your succulent could do with repotting include: 
It’s growing too big for its pot — Roots will be growing out of the drainage holes when it’s exceeding the available space. 
It’s a new succulent — If you’ve just bought a succulent home, it might come in a temporary plastic pot. It will need a more permanent home so you should repot it in a week or two. 
It’s been a few years — If it’s been two years or so since you last changed the soil, your succulent could do with a fresh batch.
The plant looks unhealthy — Your succulent may have seen better days, in which case repotting can help revitalize it.
Your succulent has grown offsets — Some succulents will also grow offsets which can be cut away from the base and then repotted to grow a whole new plant. 
You need to water it more often — If you’ve noticed the water is draining much more quickly that it used to, that means fresh soil is required.      

(Image credit: Shutterstock)
For more planting tips, tricks, and how-tos, check out our guides on how to prune hydrangeas, how to care for an orchid, and 5 things to get your garden ready for spring. 

#repot #succulents #simple #steps


Synthetic: Vik News

Vik News

Viknews Vietnam specializes in sharing useful knowledge about marriage - family, beauty, motherhood experience, nutritional care during pregnancy, before and after birth, lipstick, royal jelly, home and furniture. (wooden doors, decorative chandeliers, dining tables, kitchen cabinets..)……

Trả lời

Email của bạn sẽ không được hiển thị công khai. Các trường bắt buộc được đánh dấu *

Back to top button