Game

Let’s get physical: Meet the companies reissuing retro classics for audiences new and old

There are many ways to play classic games today, from mini consoles and Evercade to digital relaunches on the latest hardware, but some of us prefer the original hardware. That’s not wrong, of course, but modern demand doesn’t always match past supply. Some games that are considered classics today were underrated at the time. That is, there are not too many copies. Others may be geographically restricted or have been victims of publishing issues.

Let’s not forget, games are more popular than they were 30 years ago. The constant demand from gamers craving for the latest sequel is enough to drive up the price of the hottest classics. In the past, players had to pay or give up, but today there are many companies that have decided to bring their classic console games back to the market by making all-new copies that come with compatibles on original hardware. .

But why make new games for old hardware? Surprisingly, we met various motives. It was easy for the company to support other business ventures.

Marketing Manager Richard Igros said, “Retro-Bit has always wanted to launch a cart because they started making replica consoles and peripherals. “I believe there will always be demand for physical media and especially in gaming. It was a natural next step and companies are starting to see it as it becomes more and more important and mainstream across the industry.”

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retro gamer

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retro gamer

Star Wars: Shadow of the Empire

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lion king

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Mega Man Legacy Collection

(Picture source: Capcom)

“We are packaging and production snobs, and details will die for us.”

One thing is certain. Since many of these reissues are already sold out, the desire for these reissues is growing, and we should expect to see more of these releases in the future. Limited Run Games will soon reissue the cult-loved Shantae for the Game Boy Color, hinting at future plans that iam8bit is keeping secret. Retro-Bit has announced plans for a Mega Drive remake of Mega Man: The Wily Wars and Toaplan shooters, including Hellfire and Zero Wing, Irem’s Hammerin’ Harry for the NES, and Undercover Cops for the SNES.

All three companies have confirmed that they have plans to expand the number of systems they cover. Now there are other companies in this field. Piko Interactive has been around for many years, and in Japan, Columbus Circle has made a name for itself with the launch of new cartridges. It’s easy to see why some people aren’t happy with this trend. This is because new products can potentially devalue the game for which you have invested a lot of money. But if you want a solid investment, buy real estate. Games are meant to be played, and anything that allows people to play the game the way they prefer is welcome.

This feature first appeared in issue 211 of Retro Gamer Magazine. Don’t forget other great features like the one you just read. Subscribe to Magazines Direct in print or digital edition.


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Let’s get physical: Meet the companies reissuing retro classics for audiences new and old

There are plenty of ways to play classic games today, from mini consoles and the Evercade to digital re-releases on modern hardware, but some of us just prefer original hardware. There’s nothing wrong with that, of course, but modern demand doesn’t always play nicely with historical supply. Some games that are now recognised as classics were underappreciated in their own time, meaning that there aren’t too many copies to go around. Others may have been regionally restricted, or wound up as the victim of publisher problems. 
Lest we forget, gaming is also more popular than it was 30 years ago. Constant demand from players enthralled by modern sequels is enough to push up the price of even the most common of classics. In the past, that has meant that players either had to pay through the nose or go without, but today there are a number of companies out there that have decided to return classic console games to market by manufacturing brand-new copies, compatible with the original hardware. 
But why manufacture new games for obsolete hardware in the first place? Surprisingly, we encountered a variety of different motivations. For one company, it was a simple case of supporting its other business ventures. 
“Retro-Bit started producing clone consoles and peripherals so publishing carts was something we always wanted to do,” says marketing manager Richard Igros. “We believe there will always be a demand for physical media and even more so in gaming. With retro gaming having a more prominent space in the industry over the years and breaking more into the mainstream, this was only going to be a natural next step and companies are starting to realise that.” 
Back from the dead

Thinking outside the box

(Image credit: Capcom)

“We’re packaging and production snobs, and for us, the details are to die for.”

One thing’s for certain – the appetite for these reissues is out there, with many of them already sold out, and you should expect to see more of these releases in the future. Limited Run Games will shortly be reissuing the cult favourite Shantae for Game Boy Color, while iam8bit has hinted at future plans that it is keeping under wraps. Retro-Bit has announced plans for Mega Drive reissues of Mega Man: The Wily Wars and Toaplan shooters including Hellfire and Zero Wing, plus Irem’s Hammerin’ Harry for the NES and Undercover Cops for the SNES. 
All three companies have confirmed that they have plans to expand the number of systems they cover, too. Meanwhile, there are other companies in the field – Piko Interactive has been active for a number of years, and in Japan Columbus Circle has made a name for itself by issuing new cartridges. It’s easy to see why some people aren’t happy about this trend, as new supply could potentially devalue games they spent a large amount of money on. But if you want a sound investment, buy property – games are for playing, and we welcome anything that gives people a way to play them in the manner they prefer.
This feature first appeared in Retro Gamer magazine issue 211. For more excellent features, like the one you’ve just read, don’t forget to subscribe to the print or digital edition at Magazines Direct.  

#Lets #physical #Meet #companies #reissuing #retro #classics #audiences

Let’s get physical: Meet the companies reissuing retro classics for audiences new and old

There are plenty of ways to play classic games today, from mini consoles and the Evercade to digital re-releases on modern hardware, but some of us just prefer original hardware. There’s nothing wrong with that, of course, but modern demand doesn’t always play nicely with historical supply. Some games that are now recognised as classics were underappreciated in their own time, meaning that there aren’t too many copies to go around. Others may have been regionally restricted, or wound up as the victim of publisher problems. 
Lest we forget, gaming is also more popular than it was 30 years ago. Constant demand from players enthralled by modern sequels is enough to push up the price of even the most common of classics. In the past, that has meant that players either had to pay through the nose or go without, but today there are a number of companies out there that have decided to return classic console games to market by manufacturing brand-new copies, compatible with the original hardware. 
But why manufacture new games for obsolete hardware in the first place? Surprisingly, we encountered a variety of different motivations. For one company, it was a simple case of supporting its other business ventures. 
“Retro-Bit started producing clone consoles and peripherals so publishing carts was something we always wanted to do,” says marketing manager Richard Igros. “We believe there will always be a demand for physical media and even more so in gaming. With retro gaming having a more prominent space in the industry over the years and breaking more into the mainstream, this was only going to be a natural next step and companies are starting to realise that.” 
Back from the dead

Thinking outside the box

(Image credit: Capcom)

“We’re packaging and production snobs, and for us, the details are to die for.”

One thing’s for certain – the appetite for these reissues is out there, with many of them already sold out, and you should expect to see more of these releases in the future. Limited Run Games will shortly be reissuing the cult favourite Shantae for Game Boy Color, while iam8bit has hinted at future plans that it is keeping under wraps. Retro-Bit has announced plans for Mega Drive reissues of Mega Man: The Wily Wars and Toaplan shooters including Hellfire and Zero Wing, plus Irem’s Hammerin’ Harry for the NES and Undercover Cops for the SNES. 
All three companies have confirmed that they have plans to expand the number of systems they cover, too. Meanwhile, there are other companies in the field – Piko Interactive has been active for a number of years, and in Japan Columbus Circle has made a name for itself by issuing new cartridges. It’s easy to see why some people aren’t happy about this trend, as new supply could potentially devalue games they spent a large amount of money on. But if you want a sound investment, buy property – games are for playing, and we welcome anything that gives people a way to play them in the manner they prefer.
This feature first appeared in Retro Gamer magazine issue 211. For more excellent features, like the one you’ve just read, don’t forget to subscribe to the print or digital edition at Magazines Direct.  

#Lets #physical #Meet #companies #reissuing #retro #classics #audiences


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I'm Do Thuy, passionate about creativity, blogging every day is what I'm doing. It's really what I love. Follow me for useful knowledge about society, community and learning.

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