Reviews

Michael Bay defibrillates old-school action cinema with Ambulance

“Are people still robbing banks?” Someone asks about Michael Bay’s heist/car chase thriller halfway through. ambulance. “Do people still make movies about bank robberies? More precisely, people still make movies,” she said. then What about people trying to rob a bank? It is a rare moment of self-awareness in a very unconscious retreat. It’s an action movie straight out of the mid-’90s, but certainly not smart.

ambulance belongs to a specific type of action film that has been pushed out of theaters in the last two decades by the franchise’s fantastic digital blockbuster. It’s a unique idea to stage a real-world spectacle of car crashes, gunfire, stunts and sweaty actors coordinated by the director’s maddening ringmaster who won’t stop at anything to achieve the desired success. he has in mind It’s quirky, interesting, quirky (with a running time of 136 minutes) and oddly refreshing.

What’s really odd is that this shock to the traditional action film system comes from the Bay, which has been a headache for film critics and movie buffs for nearly two decades. He is a director who is passionate about editing and camera work, making action films an almost unreadable visual attack. He’s a director with five increasingly terrifying Transformers films representing the bottom of Hollywood’s public-cast intellectual property mine. He is a 1996 Prison Hug, a director who only received a “Cool” rating on Rotten Tomatoes. rock. funny savior.

Photo courtesy of Andrew Cooper/Universal Pictures

ambulance Rustic by standards with a $40 million budget and realistic setting on the streets of Los Angeles, it’s not a true departure to the bay. Based on the 2005 Danish film paramedic, ambulance Follows adopted brothers Danny and Will Sharp (Jake Gyllenhaal and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II). Danny is a bank robber following in the footsteps of his infamous father, and Will is a veteran who has left a life of crime behind. Will’s wife, Amy (Moses Ingram), needs expensive surgery that is not covered by insurance. Desperately, Will hires Danny, who gets him involved in a major case of armed robbery at a federal bank. The robber is shot by the wrong and inexperienced cop Zach (Jackson White) and Will and Danny hijack an ambulance carrying the injured cop and paramedic Cam Thompson (Eiza González) while they search for an escape route. The hostages provide some protection to the brothers from the LAPD chase, but as the chase grows intensifying across the city, it complicates the brothers, especially Will and his conscience.

It is an effective premise to build the external story of the car chase and the pressure cooker drama of an ambulance at the same time. Bay also features two iconic ’90s LA thrillers and isn’t afraid to revisit. Heat And speed. It borrows heavily from images from both films. Heat in a violent and heartbreaking shootout between a police officer and a robber in front of a bank; speed In all zoomed-in aerial photos of municipal vehicles being chased off the highway by battalions of police cars and helicopters that must keep a safe distance. Will Bay also shows a slow-motion video of an ambulance going through stagnant water along the concrete floor of the Los Angeles River. terminator 2-style? Of course he does.

Ambulance chased by two helicopters on the LA River

Image: Universal Image

ambulanceIts biggest advantage is the speed at which it creates tension. The plot and protagonists combine with quick efficiency to get us immersed in the action as quickly as possible, where speed and pressure build up steadily. The structure of the film has its own dynamism, which Bay charges with his constant cinematic energy. The first half of the chase and the tension in the ambulance at the same time culminate in the middle third of the film, which is breathtaking. But it’s impossible to maintain that excitement for such a long time, and the music fades as the movie ends, especially after some over-developed plot mechanics force the ambulance to stop. Restart at least once. Bay and Screenwriter Chris Fedak Learned Nothing speedLesson: Never stop driving.

What talented actors like Gyllenhaal and Abdul-Martin are doing in this film is a bit of a mystery. Not because of her demeanor, but because of Bay, the authoritative style director and itchy finger in the editing room, the actors do their job with little to no sight except for the moving parts of the frame. An actor who looks physically and emotionally heavy, Abdul-Mateen, despite having a good sympathy with him, seems a bit stoic as he struggles to keep up with the film’s gonzo energy. Gonzalez But with less restraint and an instinct for intense intensity, Gyllenhaal easily takes the level of her films. To his credit, Danny remains an unpredictable and morally ambiguous character longer than the film’s mere plot allows.

Jake Gyllenhaal and Aza Gonzalez rush through the ambulance back door

Photo courtesy of Andrew Cooper/Universal Pictures

But the protagonist of ambulance Really Michael Bay, even in this relatively well-founded work, he attacks every moment in an urgent and maximal style. This style – often known as “Bayhem”, has been wonderfully analyzed. each frame picture Video Essay – Got a lot of ridicule for the constant camera movement. his quick and chaotic cut; Lack of nuance. However, this should not be confused with incompetence or inconsistency. It is a deliberate stylistic choice executed with great skill.

that cannot be denied ambulance A dizzying array of (mostly) doubly impressive sequences from cameras, real-world effects and stunts. Shooting can be breathtakingly daring, and comes in the form of crazy shelling powered by Lorne Balfe’s incredible score. Drone cameras dive into the sides of buildings, dash through column mazes, and slide under bouncing cars. A scene that other filmmakers are proud of, Bay allows a second or two before ordering five more. Excess is a sin, the narrative is distorted, and the effect is overwhelming (especially in theatres). It made me laugh. It was half ridicule, half joy.

There is nothing too much for Bay. therefore ambulance Finally, he succumbs to his excesses. That’s why this thriller, which should be a nimble and effective thriller, is made up of surprisingly large and complex supporting actors. (The accessible man, Garret Dillahunt, stands out as the leader of an elite LAPD squad.) So there’s a ludicrous subplot involving gangster cartels, radio-controlled miniguns, and operational scenes. Improvised with cell phone, hairpin, anesthetic forceps. But it also makes it a thrill and a kind of luxury to see Bayhem get it out of the CGI workstation and back into the streets. That’s where his technical ingenuity can shine, and his worn-out pride starts to look kind of retro-cool.

ambulance I’m at the cinema now.


More information

Michael Bay defibrillates old-school action cinema with Ambulance

“Are people still robbing banks?” someone asks about halfway through Michael Bay’s heist/car chase thriller Ambulance. She might as well have asked, “Are people still making movies about bank robbers? Or, more accurately, “People still make movies like that about people who rob banks? It’s a rare moment of self-awareness in an otherwise very unconscious throwback: an action movie that might be straight out of the mid-’90s, but is definitely not smart about it.
Ambulance belongs to a specific breed of action movie that has been driven from theaters over the past two decades by the franchise’s fantastic digital blockbuster. It’s a unique idea that sets off a hands-on spectacle of car crashes, gunfights, stunts and sweaty actors, orchestrated by a deranged ringmaster from a director who will stop at nothing to get the hit he wants. he has in mind. It’s silly, exciting, unruly (with a running time of 136 minutes) and oddly refreshing.
The really odd thing is that this shock to the old-school action moviemaking system comes from Bay, who has been a bane for film critics and cinephiles for the better part of two decades. He’s the director whose taste for frenetic cutting and camera work turned action movies into barely readable visual assaults. He’s the director whose five increasingly terrible Transformers films represent the nadir of Hollywood’s intellectual property strip mine. He’s the director who’s only managed one ‘cool’ rating so far on Rotten Tomatoes, for his 1996 prison hug The rock. Funny savior.

Photo: Andrew Cooper/Universal Pictures
Ambulance doesn’t register as an actual departure for Bay, though it’s modest by his standards, with a $40 million budget and a down-to-earth setting on the streets of Los Angeles. Based on the 2005 Danish film paramedic, Ambulance follows adoptive brothers Danny and Will Sharp (Jake Gyllenhaal and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II). Danny is a bank robber, following in the footsteps of their notorious father, while Will is a combat veteran who left the life of crime behind. Will’s wife, Amy (Moses Ingram), needs expensive surgery that insurance won’t pay for; in desperation, Will enlists Danny, who drags him into a big score: an armed raid on a federal bank. The heist goes awry, rookie cop Zach (Jackson White) gets shot, and as Will and Danny search for an escape route, they hijack the ambulance carrying the injured cop and the paramedic treating him, Cam Thompson ( Eiza González). The hostages provide the brothers with a level of protection from LAPD pursuit forces, but also complicate matters for them – especially Will and his conscience – as an escalating pursuit roars through the city.
It’s an effective premise that sets up both the outward action of the chase and the pressure cooker drama inside the ambulance. Bay also isn’t afraid to tap into and echo two iconic LA thrillers from the 90s, Heat and Speed. It borrows heavily from the imagery of both films: Heat in a fierce, heartbreaking firefight downtown between cops and robbers outside the bank; Speed in all the zoomed, aerial shots of a municipal vehicle being chased down the highway by a battalion of police cars and helicopters who must keep a safe distance. Will Bay also features slow-motion footage of the ambulance driving through standing water along the concrete bed of the Los Angeles River, Terminator 2-style? Of course he does.

Image: Universal Images
AmbulanceThe greatest strength of is the speed with which it creates tension. The plot and main characters are put together with rapid efficiency to get us into the action as quickly as possible, and the pacing and pressure builds steadily from there. The film’s structure has an inherent momentum that Bay supercharges with his relentless cinematic energy. The middle third of the film, as the first leg of the chase and the tensions inside the ambulance reach a simultaneous climax, is truly breathless. But it’s just not possible to sustain that level of excitement for such a long duration, and the tune drops out of the film towards the end, especially after some over-developed plot mechanics force the ambulance to stop. and start over more than once. Bay and screenwriter Chris Fedak didn’t learn SpeedThe lesson of: never stop riding.
It’s a bit of a mystery what actors as talented as Gyllenhaal and Abdul-Mateen do in this movie. Not because it’s beneath them, but because Bay, a director with an authoritarian style and an itchy finger in the editing suite, rarely sees actors as anything more than moving parts in the frame, and it is unlikely to leave much room for them to do their job. Abdul-Mateen, an actor of enormous physical and emotional gravity, looks faintly, stoically lost, as if struggling to keep up with the film’s gonzo energy – although he has good likable chemistry with him. Gonzalez. Gyllenhaal, who has few inhibitions and an instinct for luscious intensity, however finds the level of the film easily. To his credit, Danny remains an unpredictable and morally ambiguous character, as well as a fun and unhinged character, for longer than the film’s simple plot allows.

Photo: Andrew Cooper/Universal Pictures
But the main character of Ambulance really is Michael Bay, who, even in a relatively grounded piece like this, attacks every moment in his urgent, maximalist style. This style – often known as “Bayhem” and analyzed in an excellent Each frame a painting video essay – is much ridiculed for his incessant camera movement; its quick and disorienting cuts; and its lack of nuance. However, it should not be confused with incompetence or incoherence: it is a deliberate stylistic choice, implemented with great technicality.
It is undeniable that Ambulance is a dizzying assembly of sequences twice as impressive to be (mostly) in camera, practical effects and stunts. The shooting can be breathtakingly daring, and it comes in the form of a delirious barrage, driven by Lorne Balfe’s jaw-dropping score. Drone cameras dive down the sides of buildings, speed through mazes of pillars, and glide under bouncing cars. Shots that other filmmakers would linger on with pride, Bay allows a second or two before lining up five more. Excess is sinful, the narrative is garbled, the effect is overwhelming (especially in a theater). It made me laugh, half mockery, half joy.
Nothing is too much for Bay. That is why Ambulance eventually relents under his own overindulgence. That’s why what should be a lean and effective thriller has a surprisingly large and complex cast of supporting characters. (The accessibly macho Garret Dillahunt stands out as captain of the elite LAPD squad.) That’s why there’s a ridiculous subplot involving a gangster cartel and a radio-controlled minigun, and a surgery scene. improvised using a cell phone, a hair clip and a punch for anesthesia. But that’s also what makes it a thrill, and a kind of luxury, to watch Bayhem take Bayhem out of the CGI workstation and back into the streets. There, his technical ingenuity can shine, and his vapid pride begins to look like some kind of retro cool.
Ambulance is in theaters now.

Register to receive the newsletter
Patch NotesA weekly roundup of Polygon’s best stuff

One more thing!
Please check your email to find a confirmation email and follow the steps to confirm your humanity.

E-mail (mandatory)

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Notice and European Users agree to the Data Transfer Policy.
Subscribe

#Michael #Bay #defibrillates #oldschool #action #cinema #Ambulance

Michael Bay defibrillates old-school action cinema with Ambulance

“Are people still robbing banks?” someone asks about halfway through Michael Bay’s heist/car chase thriller Ambulance. She might as well have asked, “Are people still making movies about bank robbers? Or, more accurately, “People still make movies like that about people who rob banks? It’s a rare moment of self-awareness in an otherwise very unconscious throwback: an action movie that might be straight out of the mid-’90s, but is definitely not smart about it.
Ambulance belongs to a specific breed of action movie that has been driven from theaters over the past two decades by the franchise’s fantastic digital blockbuster. It’s a unique idea that sets off a hands-on spectacle of car crashes, gunfights, stunts and sweaty actors, orchestrated by a deranged ringmaster from a director who will stop at nothing to get the hit he wants. he has in mind. It’s silly, exciting, unruly (with a running time of 136 minutes) and oddly refreshing.
The really odd thing is that this shock to the old-school action moviemaking system comes from Bay, who has been a bane for film critics and cinephiles for the better part of two decades. He’s the director whose taste for frenetic cutting and camera work turned action movies into barely readable visual assaults. He’s the director whose five increasingly terrible Transformers films represent the nadir of Hollywood’s intellectual property strip mine. He’s the director who’s only managed one ‘cool’ rating so far on Rotten Tomatoes, for his 1996 prison hug The rock. Funny savior.

Photo: Andrew Cooper/Universal Pictures
Ambulance doesn’t register as an actual departure for Bay, though it’s modest by his standards, with a $40 million budget and a down-to-earth setting on the streets of Los Angeles. Based on the 2005 Danish film paramedic, Ambulance follows adoptive brothers Danny and Will Sharp (Jake Gyllenhaal and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II). Danny is a bank robber, following in the footsteps of their notorious father, while Will is a combat veteran who left the life of crime behind. Will’s wife, Amy (Moses Ingram), needs expensive surgery that insurance won’t pay for; in desperation, Will enlists Danny, who drags him into a big score: an armed raid on a federal bank. The heist goes awry, rookie cop Zach (Jackson White) gets shot, and as Will and Danny search for an escape route, they hijack the ambulance carrying the injured cop and the paramedic treating him, Cam Thompson ( Eiza González). The hostages provide the brothers with a level of protection from LAPD pursuit forces, but also complicate matters for them – especially Will and his conscience – as an escalating pursuit roars through the city.
It’s an effective premise that sets up both the outward action of the chase and the pressure cooker drama inside the ambulance. Bay also isn’t afraid to tap into and echo two iconic LA thrillers from the 90s, Heat and Speed. It borrows heavily from the imagery of both films: Heat in a fierce, heartbreaking firefight downtown between cops and robbers outside the bank; Speed in all the zoomed, aerial shots of a municipal vehicle being chased down the highway by a battalion of police cars and helicopters who must keep a safe distance. Will Bay also features slow-motion footage of the ambulance driving through standing water along the concrete bed of the Los Angeles River, Terminator 2-style? Of course he does.

Image: Universal Images
AmbulanceThe greatest strength of is the speed with which it creates tension. The plot and main characters are put together with rapid efficiency to get us into the action as quickly as possible, and the pacing and pressure builds steadily from there. The film’s structure has an inherent momentum that Bay supercharges with his relentless cinematic energy. The middle third of the film, as the first leg of the chase and the tensions inside the ambulance reach a simultaneous climax, is truly breathless. But it’s just not possible to sustain that level of excitement for such a long duration, and the tune drops out of the film towards the end, especially after some over-developed plot mechanics force the ambulance to stop. and start over more than once. Bay and screenwriter Chris Fedak didn’t learn SpeedThe lesson of: never stop riding.
It’s a bit of a mystery what actors as talented as Gyllenhaal and Abdul-Mateen do in this movie. Not because it’s beneath them, but because Bay, a director with an authoritarian style and an itchy finger in the editing suite, rarely sees actors as anything more than moving parts in the frame, and it is unlikely to leave much room for them to do their job. Abdul-Mateen, an actor of enormous physical and emotional gravity, looks faintly, stoically lost, as if struggling to keep up with the film’s gonzo energy – although he has good likable chemistry with him. Gonzalez. Gyllenhaal, who has few inhibitions and an instinct for luscious intensity, however finds the level of the film easily. To his credit, Danny remains an unpredictable and morally ambiguous character, as well as a fun and unhinged character, for longer than the film’s simple plot allows.

Photo: Andrew Cooper/Universal Pictures
But the main character of Ambulance really is Michael Bay, who, even in a relatively grounded piece like this, attacks every moment in his urgent, maximalist style. This style – often known as “Bayhem” and analyzed in an excellent Each frame a painting video essay – is much ridiculed for his incessant camera movement; its quick and disorienting cuts; and its lack of nuance. However, it should not be confused with incompetence or incoherence: it is a deliberate stylistic choice, implemented with great technicality.
It is undeniable that Ambulance is a dizzying assembly of sequences twice as impressive to be (mostly) in camera, practical effects and stunts. The shooting can be breathtakingly daring, and it comes in the form of a delirious barrage, driven by Lorne Balfe’s jaw-dropping score. Drone cameras dive down the sides of buildings, speed through mazes of pillars, and glide under bouncing cars. Shots that other filmmakers would linger on with pride, Bay allows a second or two before lining up five more. Excess is sinful, the narrative is garbled, the effect is overwhelming (especially in a theater). It made me laugh, half mockery, half joy.
Nothing is too much for Bay. That is why Ambulance eventually relents under his own overindulgence. That’s why what should be a lean and effective thriller has a surprisingly large and complex cast of supporting characters. (The accessibly macho Garret Dillahunt stands out as captain of the elite LAPD squad.) That’s why there’s a ridiculous subplot involving a gangster cartel and a radio-controlled minigun, and a surgery scene. improvised using a cell phone, a hair clip and a punch for anesthesia. But that’s also what makes it a thrill, and a kind of luxury, to watch Bayhem take Bayhem out of the CGI workstation and back into the streets. There, his technical ingenuity can shine, and his vapid pride begins to look like some kind of retro cool.
Ambulance is in theaters now.

Register to receive the newsletter
Patch NotesA weekly roundup of Polygon’s best stuff

One more thing!
Please check your email to find a confirmation email and follow the steps to confirm your humanity.

E-mail (mandatory)

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Notice and European Users agree to the Data Transfer Policy.
Subscribe

#Michael #Bay #defibrillates #oldschool #action #cinema #Ambulance


Synthetic: Vik News

Vik News

Viknews Vietnam specializes in sharing useful knowledge about marriage - family, beauty, motherhood experience, nutritional care during pregnancy, before and after birth, lipstick, royal jelly, home and furniture. (wooden doors, decorative chandeliers, dining tables, kitchen cabinets..)……

Trả lời

Email của bạn sẽ không được hiển thị công khai. Các trường bắt buộc được đánh dấu *

Back to top button