Entertainment

Operation Mincemeat Review: Colin Firth War Drama Is Diverting & Forgettable

Matthew Macfadyen, Colin First and Johnny Flynn of Operation Mincemeat

As expected, Operation MinsmitThe UK’s collection of British talent is its greatest asset, but the film is too satisfying to see them do their job. The story (perhaps surprisingly) doesn’t fit much action, and while the actors are willing to create engaging, character-driven drama, the script leaves little to no entertainment for them. At the heart of the matter is the pseudo-triangle that forms between Ewen, Jean, and Charles, but despite Macfadyen’s best efforts as a jealous fan, it doesn’t prove particularly convincing. The subplot for potential traitors between them feels toothless, and one of the reasons may be the tone of the film. Until things actually run (sections that start out reasonably well), Madden rarely thinks that problems might arise, so it’s hard for him to take the narrative beat seriously.

These scenes in Spain are enough to grab their attention, even if they make you wonder why the whole movie wasn’t shot in Spain. We’ll even utilize the familiar wells of emotion for the inevitable ending of the story. The feeling of smooth sailing extends to the film’s footage and subject matter, which appears to be intended to capture what people love about good spy stories. There are many stories of everyone in the information community writing or wanting to write a spy novel that gets lucky with the work itself involved in building a fictional life on a corpse from scratch. Cinematography does its part, and sometimes street lights are used to create patches of light surrounded by dark fields, but this movie is far from a spy thriller style. In most cases, it has the appearance of a standard biographical film.

Kelly Macdonald in Operation Mincemeat

The contrast between this and the romantic visions of the characters seems intentional, but it’s unclear what exactly they intend. Consider, for example, when you decide to make this story the story of Bond’s tender origins, referenced transparently throughout. Is this to celebrate the everyday, life-saving reality of the MI5 by highlighting the non-bondage of the Madden movie? Are you designing initiatives like Operation Mincemeat to help creatively minded people contribute to war with maximum impact? Is it more important to bang a flashy blockbuster franchise on your knuckles to warp the truth? Instead, it plays like a film that winks aggressively to the audience, with the ultimate effect of treating these references as cameos. Operation Minsmit It’s closer to a Marvel movie than anyone can imagine. Maybe it’s not revolutionary in that way.

Operation Minsmit It opens in select theaters in the US on May 6th and starts streaming on Netflix on May 11th. The film is 128 minutes long and is rated PG-13 for strong language, some sexual content, brief wartime violence, and smoking.

Our Rating:

2.5 out of 5 (very good)


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Operation Mincemeat Review: Colin Firth War Drama Is Diverting & Forgettable

Matthew Macfadyen, Colin First, and Johnny Flynn in Operation Mincemeat
As expected, Operation Mincemeat‘s collection of British talent is its greatest asset, but the film is too content to coast on watching them do their thing. The story (perhaps surprisingly) doesn’t lend itself to a lot of action, and while the actors are game to create compelling, character-based drama, the script gives them little to play with. The crux is a pseudo-love triangle that forms between Ewen, Jean, and Charles, but despite Macfadyen’s best efforts as the jealous admirer, it doesn’t prove especially compelling. A subplot about a potential traitor in their midst feels equally toothless and the reason for both might be the movie’s tone. Until the operation is actually executed (a section that picks up quite nicely), Madden barely entertains the idea that things could go wrong, which makes it difficult to take any of the narrative beats seriously.
Still, even if those sequences in Spain will make viewers wonder why the whole movie wasn’t set there, it does enough to keep their attention. It will even tap that familiar well of emotion for the story’s inevitable conclusion. This sense of being passable extends to the film’s visuals and themes as well, which seem intent on capturing what people love about a good spy story. Much is made about everyone in the Intelligence community writing or wanting to write a spy novel, which rhymes nicely with the operation itself, which involves building a fictional life for the corpse from scratch. The cinematography does its part by occasionally using street lamps to create spots of light framed by fields of darkness, but the movie is far from styled like an espionage thriller. For the most part, it sports the look of the standard biopic.

Kelly Macdonald in Operation Mincemeat
The contrast between this and the romanticized visions of the characters feels intentional, but exactly what is intended is unclear. Take, for example, the decision to frame this as a soft-origin story for Bond, to which transparent references are made throughout. Is this designed to highlight the non-Bondness of Madden’s film, and thereby celebrate the mundane, life-saving reality of MI5? Is it to frame plans like Operation Mincemeat as how the creatively inclined contributed to the war effort with maximum impact? Is it more critically minded, rapping a flashy blockbuster franchise on the knuckles for distorting the truth? Instead, it plays like the movie aggressively winking at the audience and the ultimate effect of treating these references like cameos pulls Operation Mincemeat closer to a Marvel movie than one ever imagined it could get. Maybe watching it isn’t such a revolutionary act, after all.
Operation Mincemeat released in limited US theaters on May 6 and is streaming on Netflix as of May 11. The film is 128 minutes long and is rated PG-13 for strong language, some sexual content, brief war violence, and smoking.

Our Rating:
2.5 out of 5 (Fairly Good)

#Operation #Mincemeat #Review #Colin #Firth #War #Drama #Diverting #Forgettable

Operation Mincemeat Review: Colin Firth War Drama Is Diverting & Forgettable

Matthew Macfadyen, Colin First, and Johnny Flynn in Operation Mincemeat
As expected, Operation Mincemeat‘s collection of British talent is its greatest asset, but the film is too content to coast on watching them do their thing. The story (perhaps surprisingly) doesn’t lend itself to a lot of action, and while the actors are game to create compelling, character-based drama, the script gives them little to play with. The crux is a pseudo-love triangle that forms between Ewen, Jean, and Charles, but despite Macfadyen’s best efforts as the jealous admirer, it doesn’t prove especially compelling. A subplot about a potential traitor in their midst feels equally toothless and the reason for both might be the movie’s tone. Until the operation is actually executed (a section that picks up quite nicely), Madden barely entertains the idea that things could go wrong, which makes it difficult to take any of the narrative beats seriously.
Still, even if those sequences in Spain will make viewers wonder why the whole movie wasn’t set there, it does enough to keep their attention. It will even tap that familiar well of emotion for the story’s inevitable conclusion. This sense of being passable extends to the film’s visuals and themes as well, which seem intent on capturing what people love about a good spy story. Much is made about everyone in the Intelligence community writing or wanting to write a spy novel, which rhymes nicely with the operation itself, which involves building a fictional life for the corpse from scratch. The cinematography does its part by occasionally using street lamps to create spots of light framed by fields of darkness, but the movie is far from styled like an espionage thriller. For the most part, it sports the look of the standard biopic.

Kelly Macdonald in Operation Mincemeat
The contrast between this and the romanticized visions of the characters feels intentional, but exactly what is intended is unclear. Take, for example, the decision to frame this as a soft-origin story for Bond, to which transparent references are made throughout. Is this designed to highlight the non-Bondness of Madden’s film, and thereby celebrate the mundane, life-saving reality of MI5? Is it to frame plans like Operation Mincemeat as how the creatively inclined contributed to the war effort with maximum impact? Is it more critically minded, rapping a flashy blockbuster franchise on the knuckles for distorting the truth? Instead, it plays like the movie aggressively winking at the audience and the ultimate effect of treating these references like cameos pulls Operation Mincemeat closer to a Marvel movie than one ever imagined it could get. Maybe watching it isn’t such a revolutionary act, after all.
Operation Mincemeat released in limited US theaters on May 6 and is streaming on Netflix as of May 11. The film is 128 minutes long and is rated PG-13 for strong language, some sexual content, brief war violence, and smoking.

Our Rating:
2.5 out of 5 (Fairly Good)

#Operation #Mincemeat #Review #Colin #Firth #War #Drama #Diverting #Forgettable


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