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PS5 Pro guide: What to expect from the next-generation of PlayStation 5 hardware

Despite the fact that there aren’t many PS5 restocking updates yet, rumors about the PS5 Pro are starting to gain momentum. first though Unsubstantiated rumors have surfaced about an updated PlayStation 5 last year., But since then, we’ve seen rumors elsewhere that it will launch in 2023.

Given PlayStation’s precedent for the PS4 Pro, the PS5 Pro seems inevitable. For those of you who don’t remember the details, Sony updated their PlayStation 4 hardware in 2016 to ease the surprisingly long creation cycle, allowing all titles in the PS4 back catalog to be playable, as well as allowing new releases to run at higher framerates and more. Outputs in 4K visuals and runs more reliably than native PS4 counterparts.

This technological advance set the stage for the PS5. It was perfect for gamers looking for a little more power for their favorite PS4 games, and for those with a temporary interest in virtual reality, it provided a stronger case for early adoption on PSVR and showed the promise of 4K and HDR infused experiences. It’s no surprise that Microsoft is touting its own midgen hardware recycling with the Xbox One X, which offers comparable improvements in performance, framerate, and resolution.

So what about the PS5 Pro? There’s no question that platform owners are already looking into the future as Sony seeks to launch its first PS5 exclusives beyond launch with Horizon Forbidden West, Gran Turismo 7 and God of War Ragnarok. – After all, CPUs and GPUs are getting better and cheaper, and so are the quality of televisions and sound systems, as well as virtual and augmented reality headsets.

So while waiting for news PS5 Restock UpdateJoin us in guessing what the future holds for the fictional PS5 Pro in the future.

PS5 Pro Theme

PS5 GPU

(Image courtesy of Sony)

What do you want to say about the design of the PS5? But that’s a heck of a kit. It’s surprising that the PS5 works so quietly and nicely, but that’s probably why we’re dealing with home consoles that absolutely dominate living space. Sony is already urging them to release the PS5 Slim to reduce the PlayStation space under the TV, but we don’t know what the PS5 Pro will look like.

If you remember 2016, the PS4 Pro was a lot bigger than the base PS4. It looked like a three-layer cake made with PS4 Slims. There may be a size cost if the PlayStation wants to push for 8K fidelity and other upgrades. If you’re not a fan of the PS5’s white design and you’d like the PS5 Pro to change its color scheme, don’t forget that Sony has released it. Official PS5 faceplate in 5 color variations and a bunch Matching DualSense controllers in different colors.

PS5 Pro Pricing and Release Date

PS5 Supplement

(Image credit: Future)

during Unconfirmed rumors surfaced last year. Given the stock shortage currently affecting the base PS5 console, it seems impossible to suggest that the PS5 Pro console could launch as early as 2023 or 2024. The COVID-19 pandemic has slowed production due to chip shortages, and changes to the updated PS5 Pro’s internal chipset could help ease supply, but we are currently in uncharted territory.

After all, the PS4 Pro was released three years after the PS4 was released. This was a response to technological advances far beyond what home consoles could reasonably handle, and it makes sense to push for improvements in fidelity and performance so that gamers don’t feel pressured compared to what PC players can soon enjoy falling behind. It was. It’s unclear whether a PS5 Pro will be needed in 2023, but improvements and price cuts to 8K TVs and changes in desktop graphics inventory, price and quality could all change that.

Speaking of pricing, the PS5 hasn’t dropped its price yet from its base MSRP of $499/£449. The PS4 Pro originally launched as an effective replacement for the base $399/£349 PS4, making the PS4 Slim a cheaper alternative to the store shelves. Given the PS5’s high price, we can hope that Sony will follow a similar pattern here, but it really depends on how much it costs to produce an internal product.

PS5 Pro Specifications

Install PS5 SSD

(Image courtesy of Sony)

It’s hard to predict what the PS5 Pro specs will look like. According to a new report, the PS5 Pro should be twice as powerful as the base PS5 in terms of performance, but cannot provide exact specifications or reported hardware inclusions.

At the very least, it’s worth considering that the PS5 doesn’t have many features that early adopters lament. This includes support for 1440p output and compatibility with Dolby Atmos and Dolby Vision. We don’t know yet whether these add-ons will require a full PS5 Pro, but it’s still high on the PS5 wishlist for the feature. Of course, the PS5 is a bit of a beast capable of outputting 4K at a solid 60fps, ray tracing continues to impress, and the small implementation of 120Hz games is amazing. When there is a hardware update for the PS5 Pro, many will be hoping to see a console capable of peaking at 4K at 60fps with ray tracing enabled.

And if you believe the tech giants, it’s only a few years away before 8K TVs and monitors become commonplace in homes. PS5 It is known that a future system update will allow the game to output in 8K.However, it is difficult to know if this will eventually become a reality as 8K TVs and monitor panels are difficult to access for most consumers.

Hardware improvements appear more likely to revolve around a renewed interest in virtual reality. For more information PSVR2 The light spot is where Sony really wants to compete with it. best VR headset – Oculus Quest 2, Valve Index, HTC Vive Pro 2, and everything from the next big manufacturers – then the PS5 should be able to deliver steadfast performance, high graphics performance and innovative virtual reality experiences for years to come.

Considering PSVR 2 and 8K gaming, Sony could incorporate AMD’s upcoming GPU and CPU architectures (probably 5nm Zen 4 and RDNA 3 GPUs). This is a more viable proposition if we focus on 2023 and 2024. Of course, given that the PS5 is currently using a custom chipset based on AMD’s Zen 2 processors and RDNA 2 graphics, how far Sony will push its internals to produce one Achieve 8K output versus cost-effective ones for consumers. It’s really hard to know.

Should I wait for the PS5 Pro or buy the PS5?

PS5

(Image courtesy of Sony)

The PS5 Pro’s existence at this point is pure speculation, but we do know that Sony has big ambitions in the 8K space. Ahead of the PS5 launch, Sony has been promoting TVs that appear to support 8K resolution and 120 frames per second and are “PS5 supported”. playstation blog. Meantime Extensive Questions and Answers Explained “The PS5 will be compatible with 8K displays at launch and will be able to output resolutions up to 8K when content becomes available with supported software after a future system software update.” If Sony is serious about 8K, VR and 120fps, it’s the PS5. The Pro will definitely play a role. Especially since I’ve never actually seen a game deliver native 4K at 60fps with ray tracing enabled.

Currently, PS5 stock shortages are widespread. especially, best ps5 gamesAnd a long list of amazing looks Upcoming PS5 games, competing for our collective attention. But if you can find a PS5 on MSRP after doing some research on the console PS5 only, and if you’re happy with that decision, you’re good to go all-in. The future of 8K graphics and 120fps looks just as speculative as the current PS5 Pro. Damn, we didn’t even see what PSVR 2 would look like or what the game would be like. Don’t put off today’s fun for the unpredictable future.



More information

PS5 Pro guide: What to expect from the next-generation of PlayStation 5 hardware

Rumors of a PS5 Pro have started gaining some momentum, despite the fact that PS5 restock updates are still few and far between. The first, albeit unsubstantiated rumors, of an upgraded PlayStation 5 surfaced last year, but since then we’ve seen rumblings elsewhere that suggest it’s going to launch in 2023.
A PS5 Pro does feel inevitable, given the precedent PlayStation set in the last generation with the PS4 Pro. For those of you who don’t remember the details, back in 2016 Sony refreshed the PlayStation 4 hardware to help mitigate a surprisingly long generation cycle, delivering a console that would not only play every title from the PS4 back-catalog but allow new releases to run with higher frame rates, output with 4K visuals, and run with more stability than their base PS4 counterparts. 
This technological advancement set the stage for the PS5. It was perfect for players who were looking for a little more performance out of their favorite PS4 games, it gave those with a passing interest in virtual reality a stronger case to adopt early into PSVR, and showed us the potential for 4K and HDR-infused experiences. It’s no surprise that Microsoft delivered a mid-generation hardware recycle of its own with the Xbox One X, touting a similar boost to performance, frame rate, and resolution. 
What of the PS5 Pro, then? While Sony is only now in the midst of releasing its first wave of first-party PS5 exclusives beyond the launch window with Horizon Forbidden West, Gran Turismo 7, and God of War Ragnarok, it isn’t out of the realms of possibility that the platform holder is already looking towards the future – after all, CPUs and GPUs are always improving and dropping in price, the quality of TVs and sound systems are getting better too, as are virtual reality and augmented reality headsets. 
So, while we wait for new PS5 restock updates, join us as we speculate on what the future may hold for the hypothetical PS5 Pro in the future. 
PS5 Pro design

(Image credit: Sony)
Say what you will about the design of the PS5, but it’s a hefty bit of kit. It’s a miracle that the PS5 runs as quietly and as cooly as it does, but that’s likely the reason we’re dealing with a home console that absolutely dominates live room spaces. While there are already calls out there for Sony to release a PS5 Slim to reduce PlayStation’s real estate beneath your television set, there’s no telling what a PS5 Pro could look like. 
If you remember back to 2016, the PS4 Pro was markedly larger than the base PS4 – it looked like a three-tier layer cake made up of PS4 Slims. If PlayStation is intent on pushing for 8K fidelity and other upgrades, that could come at the cost of size. If you aren’t a fan of the white design of the PS5 and are hoping that a PS5 Pro would change up the color configuration, don’t forget that Sony released Official PS5 faceplates in five colourways and a line of DualSense controllers in different colors to match. 
PS5 Pro price and release date

(Image credit: Future)
While uncorroborated rumors surfaced last year suggesting that a PS5 Pro console could be on the way as early as 2023 or 2024, that seems unlikely given the stock shortages impacting the base PS5 console right now. There are chip shortages throttling production owing to the COVID-19 pandemic and while a change in the internal chipset on a refreshed PS5 Pro could help ease the strain on supply, we’re in uncharted waters right now. 
Ultimately, the PS4 Pro launched three years after the PS4 made its debut. It was an answer to advancements in technology far outstripping what the home consoles could reasonably handle, and it made sense to push for advancements in fidelity and performance to avoid players getting left behind when compared to what PC gamers would soon be enjoying. It’s unclear whether a PS5 Pro will be as necessary in 2023, although improvements and price reductions to 8K TVs – and a shift in stock, price, and quality of desktop graphics cards – could change all that. 
Speaking of price, the PS5 is yet to see a price reduction on its base RRP of $499/£449. The PS4 Pro originally launched as an effective replacement for the base PS4 at $399/£349, allowing the PS4 Slim to come in as a cheaper alternative on store shelves. Given the high price point of the PS5, you’d hope that Sony would follow a similar pattern here, although it really does depend on how costly the internals are in production. 
PS5 Pro specs 

(Image credit: Sony)
It’s difficult to predict what the PS5 Pro specs could look like. According to a new report, the PS5 Pro performance should be double that of the base PS5, but couldn’t give exact specs or even reported hardware inclusions.
At the very least, it’s worth considering that there are a number of features that the PS5 is missing and which early adopters are lamenting. This includes 1440p output support, along with Dolby Atmos and Dolby Vision compatibility. Whether these additions would necessitate a fully-fledged PS5 Pro remains to be seen, but they are still high on the PS5 wishlist for features. Of course, the PS5 is a bit of a beast, able to output capably at 4K, at a solid 60 FPS, ray-tracing continues to impress, and what small implementations of 120hz gaming have been dazzling too. If there were to be a PS5 Pro hardware refresh, many will be hoping to see a console which is capable of hitting peak performance of 4K at 60FPS with ray-tracing enabled. 
And if the tech giants are to be believed, we are only a few years away from 8K TVs and monitors being more commonplace in the home. The PS5 will reportedly be able to output games at 8K with a future system update, but with 8K TV and monitor panels being so inaccessible to most consumers it’s difficult to know whether this will ultimately come true.
It seems more likely that any improvements to hardware will be focused around a renewed interest in virtual reality. While details on PSVR 2 are light on the ground, if Sony really wants to compete with the best VR headsets – the Oculus Quest 2, Valve Index, HTC Vive Pro 2, and whatever should come next from the major manufacturers – then the PS5 will need to be capable of delivering unwavering performance, high graphic output, and transformative virtual reality experiences in the coming years. 
With PSVR 2 and 8K gaming to consider, Sony could look to incorporate forthcoming GPU and CPU architecture (the 5nm Zen 4 and RDNA-3 GPU, perhaps) from AMD – a more viable proposition when we start looking to 2023 and 2024. Of course, given that the PS5 currently uses a custom chipset based on the Zen 2 processor and RDNA 2 graphics from AMD, it really is difficult to know how far Sony is willing to push the internals to achieve 8K output versus cost effectiveness for consumers. 
Should you wait for a PS5 Pro or buy a PS5? 

(Image credit: Sony)
While the existence of a PS5 Pro is purely speculative at this juncture, we do know that Sony has big ambitions in the 8K space. Before the PS5 launched, Sony was promoting TVs that apparently support 8K resolution and 120 frames-per-second that are “PS5-ready” on the PlayStation blog. Meanwhile, a massive Q&A explained that “PS5 is compatible with 8K displays at launch, and after a future system software update will be able to output resolutions up to 8K when content is available, with supported software.” If Sony is serious about 8K, VR, and 120fps, then that’s where the PS5 Pro will surely factor in – especially as we’re yet to really see games deliver native 4K at 60fps with ray-tracing enabled. 
Right now, there are widespread stock shortages of the PS5. It’s proving difficult to get hold of a system, especially with the best PS5 games, and a long list of amazing-looking upcoming PS5 games, vying for our collective attention. But if you can find a PS5 at RRP, if you’ve done your research on the console and the PS5 exclusives, and you’re happy with that decision, then we’d recommend going all-in. 8K graphics and a 120 frames-per-second future seems as speculative as the PS5 Pro right now – Hell, we haven’t even seen what PSVR 2 looks like yet, let alone what its games will be like. Don’t put off enjoyment today for an incalculable amount of enjoyment in the future. 

#PS5 #Pro #guide #expect #nextgeneration #PlayStation #hardware

PS5 Pro guide: What to expect from the next-generation of PlayStation 5 hardware

Rumors of a PS5 Pro have started gaining some momentum, despite the fact that PS5 restock updates are still few and far between. The first, albeit unsubstantiated rumors, of an upgraded PlayStation 5 surfaced last year, but since then we’ve seen rumblings elsewhere that suggest it’s going to launch in 2023.
A PS5 Pro does feel inevitable, given the precedent PlayStation set in the last generation with the PS4 Pro. For those of you who don’t remember the details, back in 2016 Sony refreshed the PlayStation 4 hardware to help mitigate a surprisingly long generation cycle, delivering a console that would not only play every title from the PS4 back-catalog but allow new releases to run with higher frame rates, output with 4K visuals, and run with more stability than their base PS4 counterparts. 
This technological advancement set the stage for the PS5. It was perfect for players who were looking for a little more performance out of their favorite PS4 games, it gave those with a passing interest in virtual reality a stronger case to adopt early into PSVR, and showed us the potential for 4K and HDR-infused experiences. It’s no surprise that Microsoft delivered a mid-generation hardware recycle of its own with the Xbox One X, touting a similar boost to performance, frame rate, and resolution. 
What of the PS5 Pro, then? While Sony is only now in the midst of releasing its first wave of first-party PS5 exclusives beyond the launch window with Horizon Forbidden West, Gran Turismo 7, and God of War Ragnarok, it isn’t out of the realms of possibility that the platform holder is already looking towards the future – after all, CPUs and GPUs are always improving and dropping in price, the quality of TVs and sound systems are getting better too, as are virtual reality and augmented reality headsets. 
So, while we wait for new PS5 restock updates, join us as we speculate on what the future may hold for the hypothetical PS5 Pro in the future. 
PS5 Pro design

(Image credit: Sony)
Say what you will about the design of the PS5, but it’s a hefty bit of kit. It’s a miracle that the PS5 runs as quietly and as cooly as it does, but that’s likely the reason we’re dealing with a home console that absolutely dominates live room spaces. While there are already calls out there for Sony to release a PS5 Slim to reduce PlayStation’s real estate beneath your television set, there’s no telling what a PS5 Pro could look like. 
If you remember back to 2016, the PS4 Pro was markedly larger than the base PS4 – it looked like a three-tier layer cake made up of PS4 Slims. If PlayStation is intent on pushing for 8K fidelity and other upgrades, that could come at the cost of size. If you aren’t a fan of the white design of the PS5 and are hoping that a PS5 Pro would change up the color configuration, don’t forget that Sony released Official PS5 faceplates in five colourways and a line of DualSense controllers in different colors to match. 
PS5 Pro price and release date

(Image credit: Future)
While uncorroborated rumors surfaced last year suggesting that a PS5 Pro console could be on the way as early as 2023 or 2024, that seems unlikely given the stock shortages impacting the base PS5 console right now. There are chip shortages throttling production owing to the COVID-19 pandemic and while a change in the internal chipset on a refreshed PS5 Pro could help ease the strain on supply, we’re in uncharted waters right now. 
Ultimately, the PS4 Pro launched three years after the PS4 made its debut. It was an answer to advancements in technology far outstripping what the home consoles could reasonably handle, and it made sense to push for advancements in fidelity and performance to avoid players getting left behind when compared to what PC gamers would soon be enjoying. It’s unclear whether a PS5 Pro will be as necessary in 2023, although improvements and price reductions to 8K TVs – and a shift in stock, price, and quality of desktop graphics cards – could change all that. 
Speaking of price, the PS5 is yet to see a price reduction on its base RRP of $499/£449. The PS4 Pro originally launched as an effective replacement for the base PS4 at $399/£349, allowing the PS4 Slim to come in as a cheaper alternative on store shelves. Given the high price point of the PS5, you’d hope that Sony would follow a similar pattern here, although it really does depend on how costly the internals are in production. 
PS5 Pro specs 

(Image credit: Sony)
It’s difficult to predict what the PS5 Pro specs could look like. According to a new report, the PS5 Pro performance should be double that of the base PS5, but couldn’t give exact specs or even reported hardware inclusions.
At the very least, it’s worth considering that there are a number of features that the PS5 is missing and which early adopters are lamenting. This includes 1440p output support, along with Dolby Atmos and Dolby Vision compatibility. Whether these additions would necessitate a fully-fledged PS5 Pro remains to be seen, but they are still high on the PS5 wishlist for features. Of course, the PS5 is a bit of a beast, able to output capably at 4K, at a solid 60 FPS, ray-tracing continues to impress, and what small implementations of 120hz gaming have been dazzling too. If there were to be a PS5 Pro hardware refresh, many will be hoping to see a console which is capable of hitting peak performance of 4K at 60FPS with ray-tracing enabled. 
And if the tech giants are to be believed, we are only a few years away from 8K TVs and monitors being more commonplace in the home. The PS5 will reportedly be able to output games at 8K with a future system update, but with 8K TV and monitor panels being so inaccessible to most consumers it’s difficult to know whether this will ultimately come true.
It seems more likely that any improvements to hardware will be focused around a renewed interest in virtual reality. While details on PSVR 2 are light on the ground, if Sony really wants to compete with the best VR headsets – the Oculus Quest 2, Valve Index, HTC Vive Pro 2, and whatever should come next from the major manufacturers – then the PS5 will need to be capable of delivering unwavering performance, high graphic output, and transformative virtual reality experiences in the coming years. 
With PSVR 2 and 8K gaming to consider, Sony could look to incorporate forthcoming GPU and CPU architecture (the 5nm Zen 4 and RDNA-3 GPU, perhaps) from AMD – a more viable proposition when we start looking to 2023 and 2024. Of course, given that the PS5 currently uses a custom chipset based on the Zen 2 processor and RDNA 2 graphics from AMD, it really is difficult to know how far Sony is willing to push the internals to achieve 8K output versus cost effectiveness for consumers. 
Should you wait for a PS5 Pro or buy a PS5? 

(Image credit: Sony)
While the existence of a PS5 Pro is purely speculative at this juncture, we do know that Sony has big ambitions in the 8K space. Before the PS5 launched, Sony was promoting TVs that apparently support 8K resolution and 120 frames-per-second that are “PS5-ready” on the PlayStation blog. Meanwhile, a massive Q&A explained that “PS5 is compatible with 8K displays at launch, and after a future system software update will be able to output resolutions up to 8K when content is available, with supported software.” If Sony is serious about 8K, VR, and 120fps, then that’s where the PS5 Pro will surely factor in – especially as we’re yet to really see games deliver native 4K at 60fps with ray-tracing enabled. 
Right now, there are widespread stock shortages of the PS5. It’s proving difficult to get hold of a system, especially with the best PS5 games, and a long list of amazing-looking upcoming PS5 games, vying for our collective attention. But if you can find a PS5 at RRP, if you’ve done your research on the console and the PS5 exclusives, and you’re happy with that decision, then we’d recommend going all-in. 8K graphics and a 120 frames-per-second future seems as speculative as the PS5 Pro right now – Hell, we haven’t even seen what PSVR 2 looks like yet, let alone what its games will be like. Don’t put off enjoyment today for an incalculable amount of enjoyment in the future. 

#PS5 #Pro #guide #expect #nextgeneration #PlayStation #hardware


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