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Sandman & 9 Other Best Neil Gaiman Characters

Almost all of Neil Gaiman’s characters carry the term “interesting”, but there’s something reluctantly whimsical about Merv Pumpkinhead. This sarcastic scarecrow is a resident of the Dreaming who’s in charge of public services such as construction, bus driving, and janitorial duties.

SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY

With a cigarette clutched between his teeth and a smart aleck remark at the ready, Merv is unquestionably one of the more comedic characters in Gaiman’s arsenal. Although he’s a secondary character in the realm of the Sandman, he does have his own spin-off comic book series.

Timothy Hunter (Books Of Magic)

There’s no dancing around the comparison, Timothy Hunter is essentially Neil Gaiman’s Harry Potter. The protagonist of the Books of Magic miniseries, Timothy is swept away on his own magical journey with the Trenchcoat Brigade. Although Harry is the most famous boy wizard out there, Timothy Hunter predates the Boy Who Lived by a full seven years.

Harry Potter might have his magicians and muggles, but Timothy gets to rub elbows with some of DC comics’ most iconic magic users, including John Constantine and Zatanna. If readers have grown tired of J.K. Rowling, Neil Gaiman is often the more charming alternative.

Lucifer Morningstar (Sandman)

With the recent controversy surrounding the casting of Gwendoline Christie as Lucifer in the upcoming Sandman series, it might be a good time to talk about Neil Gaiman’s version of the devil himself. Although the Lucifer TV series did take some inspiration from Gaiman’s adaptation, the version presented in Sandman is much more elegant and terrifying.

Lucifer as they appear in the comic books is something more akin to the fallen angel seen in Paradise Lost mixed with some of David Bowie’s theatrics. It’s this mixture of the beautiful and the infernal that makes this version of the devil so captivating and, for lack of better words, tempting.

Crowley (Good Omens)

On the subject of devils, there are perhaps few more entertaining than Crowley, seen in Good Omens. Easily one of David tenant’s best roles, Crowley is a demon that has simply been on earth too long and gone native. Like his counterpart, Aziraphale, he has simply grown too accustomed to the ways of humanity to want them destroyed.

Although the angel is arguably just as funny and entertaining as his frenemy, Crowley absolutely devours every page and moment of screen time he gets. Sometimes it’s just good to be bad.

The Corinthian (Sandman)

Neil Gaiman definitely has a gift for monsters, and that can be seen with several members of his imaginary entourage. Coraline’s beastly and button-eyed Beldam might be the one most think of, but those familiar with the Sandman series know the true terror of The Corinthian.

The Corinthian is more than just a serial killer with a snazzy pair of sunglasses. He’s a nightmare come to life brought from the dream realm into the mortal plane with an insatiable hunger for bloodshed and carnage. And that’s not even mentioning the teeth behind the shades and his taste for human eyeballs.

The Heroes (Marvel 1602)

Marvel 1602 was truly a different direction for the earth’s mightiest heroes, and that’s putting it lightly. In Gaiman’s corner of the multiverse, Doctor Strange, Spider-Man, Daredevil, and even the Guardians of the Galaxy all came into existence 500 years earlier in earth’s timeline, resulting in them existing alongside famous figures such as Queen Elizabeth and William Shakespeare.

The plot is standard comic book fare, the heroes fight the villains and save the day, but the way Gaiman weaves in the culture of the era and reimagines familiar characters as completely new personae is absolutely genius.

The Gods (American Gods)

Like the ancient pantheons of old, there are so many gods, goddesses, and other figures inspired by classic mythology that populate the pages of American Gods that it’s hard to pick just one. All of them have some semblance of their former, ancient selves, yet they also have modernized forms that allow them to exist among humans.

Odin is a conman and Anansi is an elderly storyteller, but all the gods are still their mythic selves behind the glamor of their mortal disguises. Through his retelling of these myths, Gaiman clearly shows his devotion to the classic stories of the ancient world.

Shadow Moon (American Gods)

The entirety of American Gods is seen through the eyes of Shadow Moon, and it’s as if Gaiman cast the role for this story perfectly. Shadow is essentially the stand-in for the audience, regardless of whether it’s the book or the TV show. He’s the one that gets to see both the Old Gods and the New Gods in action, and his reactions help move the story.

Although Shadow might react slightly more even-tempered than most upon meeting any form of mythological being, he’s not a boring character by any means. Like Dante through the rings of the inferno, Shadow takes his journey with the many gods and deities who have come to America.

Coraline Jones (Coraline)

Coraline is arguably one of Neil Gaiman’s most famous and possibly scariest works of fiction. This dark fairytale sees the brave Coraline explore a doorway to a secret world hidden in the walls of her house. While there are notes of Alice in Wonderland, such as a talking mysterious cat, there are no Mad Hatters and March Hares here.

Both the book and the movie paint Coraline as a heroic yet human protagonist who overcomes the odds, obstacles, and Other Mother set before her, but she isn’t without her human faults and fears. In short, she’s a very relatable heroine that can reach audiences of any age.

Dream (Sandman)

Regarded by many to be one of the author’s most incredible creations, Sandman rose from the depths of obscurity and into the forefront of Vertigo Comics. Lord of Dreams, Prince of Stories, Sandman, and even more illustrious titles are given to Morpheus, better known as Dream of the Endless.

The Sandman comics and stories have sent Dream across the fabric of reality on many adventures. From encountering members of the Justice League to walking into the front door of Hell itself on the quest for a magic helmet, there’s no denying the versatility and likability of the character.


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Sandman & 9 Other Best Neil Gaiman Characters

Almost all of Neil Gaiman’s characters carry the term “interesting”, but there’s something reluctantly whimsical about Merv Pumpkinhead. This sarcastic scarecrow is a resident of the Dreaming who’s in charge of public services such as construction, bus driving, and janitorial duties.
SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY
With a cigarette clutched between his teeth and a smart aleck remark at the ready, Merv is unquestionably one of the more comedic characters in Gaiman’s arsenal. Although he’s a secondary character in the realm of the Sandman, he does have his own spin-off comic book series.
Timothy Hunter (Books Of Magic)

There’s no dancing around the comparison, Timothy Hunter is essentially Neil Gaiman’s Harry Potter. The protagonist of the Books of Magic miniseries, Timothy is swept away on his own magical journey with the Trenchcoat Brigade. Although Harry is the most famous boy wizard out there, Timothy Hunter predates the Boy Who Lived by a full seven years.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr2’); });

Harry Potter might have his magicians and muggles, but Timothy gets to rub elbows with some of DC comics’ most iconic magic users, including John Constantine and Zatanna. If readers have grown tired of J.K. Rowling, Neil Gaiman is often the more charming alternative.
Lucifer Morningstar (Sandman)

With the recent controversy surrounding the casting of Gwendoline Christie as Lucifer in the upcoming Sandman series, it might be a good time to talk about Neil Gaiman’s version of the devil himself. Although the Lucifer TV series did take some inspiration from Gaiman’s adaptation, the version presented in Sandman is much more elegant and terrifying.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

Lucifer as they appear in the comic books is something more akin to the fallen angel seen in Paradise Lost mixed with some of David Bowie’s theatrics. It’s this mixture of the beautiful and the infernal that makes this version of the devil so captivating and, for lack of better words, tempting.
Crowley (Good Omens)

On the subject of devils, there are perhaps few more entertaining than Crowley, seen in Good Omens. Easily one of David tenant’s best roles, Crowley is a demon that has simply been on earth too long and gone native. Like his counterpart, Aziraphale, he has simply grown too accustomed to the ways of humanity to want them destroyed.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

Although the angel is arguably just as funny and entertaining as his frenemy, Crowley absolutely devours every page and moment of screen time he gets. Sometimes it’s just good to be bad.
The Corinthian (Sandman)

Neil Gaiman definitely has a gift for monsters, and that can be seen with several members of his imaginary entourage. Coraline’s beastly and button-eyed Beldam might be the one most think of, but those familiar with the Sandman series know the true terror of The Corinthian.
The Corinthian is more than just a serial killer with a snazzy pair of sunglasses. He’s a nightmare come to life brought from the dream realm into the mortal plane with an insatiable hunger for bloodshed and carnage. And that’s not even mentioning the teeth behind the shades and his taste for human eyeballs.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

The Heroes (Marvel 1602)

Marvel 1602 was truly a different direction for the earth’s mightiest heroes, and that’s putting it lightly. In Gaiman’s corner of the multiverse, Doctor Strange, Spider-Man, Daredevil, and even the Guardians of the Galaxy all came into existence 500 years earlier in earth’s timeline, resulting in them existing alongside famous figures such as Queen Elizabeth and William Shakespeare.
The plot is standard comic book fare, the heroes fight the villains and save the day, but the way Gaiman weaves in the culture of the era and reimagines familiar characters as completely new personae is absolutely genius.
The Gods (American Gods)

Like the ancient pantheons of old, there are so many gods, goddesses, and other figures inspired by classic mythology that populate the pages of American Gods that it’s hard to pick just one. All of them have some semblance of their former, ancient selves, yet they also have modernized forms that allow them to exist among humans.
Odin is a conman and Anansi is an elderly storyteller, but all the gods are still their mythic selves behind the glamor of their mortal disguises. Through his retelling of these myths, Gaiman clearly shows his devotion to the classic stories of the ancient world.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT6’); });

Shadow Moon (American Gods)

The entirety of American Gods is seen through the eyes of Shadow Moon, and it’s as if Gaiman cast the role for this story perfectly. Shadow is essentially the stand-in for the audience, regardless of whether it’s the book or the TV show. He’s the one that gets to see both the Old Gods and the New Gods in action, and his reactions help move the story.
Although Shadow might react slightly more even-tempered than most upon meeting any form of mythological being, he’s not a boring character by any means. Like Dante through the rings of the inferno, Shadow takes his journey with the many gods and deities who have come to America.
Coraline Jones (Coraline)

Coraline is arguably one of Neil Gaiman’s most famous and possibly scariest works of fiction. This dark fairytale sees the brave Coraline explore a doorway to a secret world hidden in the walls of her house. While there are notes of Alice in Wonderland, such as a talking mysterious cat, there are no Mad Hatters and March Hares here.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT7’); });

Both the book and the movie paint Coraline as a heroic yet human protagonist who overcomes the odds, obstacles, and Other Mother set before her, but she isn’t without her human faults and fears. In short, she’s a very relatable heroine that can reach audiences of any age.
Dream (Sandman)

Regarded by many to be one of the author’s most incredible creations, Sandman rose from the depths of obscurity and into the forefront of Vertigo Comics. Lord of Dreams, Prince of Stories, Sandman, and even more illustrious titles are given to Morpheus, better known as Dream of the Endless.
The Sandman comics and stories have sent Dream across the fabric of reality on many adventures. From encountering members of the Justice League to walking into the front door of Hell itself on the quest for a magic helmet, there’s no denying the versatility and likability of the character.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-0’); });

#Sandman #Neil #Gaiman #Characters

Sandman & 9 Other Best Neil Gaiman Characters

Almost all of Neil Gaiman’s characters carry the term “interesting”, but there’s something reluctantly whimsical about Merv Pumpkinhead. This sarcastic scarecrow is a resident of the Dreaming who’s in charge of public services such as construction, bus driving, and janitorial duties.
SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY
With a cigarette clutched between his teeth and a smart aleck remark at the ready, Merv is unquestionably one of the more comedic characters in Gaiman’s arsenal. Although he’s a secondary character in the realm of the Sandman, he does have his own spin-off comic book series.
Timothy Hunter (Books Of Magic)

There’s no dancing around the comparison, Timothy Hunter is essentially Neil Gaiman’s Harry Potter. The protagonist of the Books of Magic miniseries, Timothy is swept away on his own magical journey with the Trenchcoat Brigade. Although Harry is the most famous boy wizard out there, Timothy Hunter predates the Boy Who Lived by a full seven years.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr2’); });

Harry Potter might have his magicians and muggles, but Timothy gets to rub elbows with some of DC comics’ most iconic magic users, including John Constantine and Zatanna. If readers have grown tired of J.K. Rowling, Neil Gaiman is often the more charming alternative.
Lucifer Morningstar (Sandman)

With the recent controversy surrounding the casting of Gwendoline Christie as Lucifer in the upcoming Sandman series, it might be a good time to talk about Neil Gaiman’s version of the devil himself. Although the Lucifer TV series did take some inspiration from Gaiman’s adaptation, the version presented in Sandman is much more elegant and terrifying.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

Lucifer as they appear in the comic books is something more akin to the fallen angel seen in Paradise Lost mixed with some of David Bowie’s theatrics. It’s this mixture of the beautiful and the infernal that makes this version of the devil so captivating and, for lack of better words, tempting.
Crowley (Good Omens)

On the subject of devils, there are perhaps few more entertaining than Crowley, seen in Good Omens. Easily one of David tenant’s best roles, Crowley is a demon that has simply been on earth too long and gone native. Like his counterpart, Aziraphale, he has simply grown too accustomed to the ways of humanity to want them destroyed.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

Although the angel is arguably just as funny and entertaining as his frenemy, Crowley absolutely devours every page and moment of screen time he gets. Sometimes it’s just good to be bad.
The Corinthian (Sandman)

Neil Gaiman definitely has a gift for monsters, and that can be seen with several members of his imaginary entourage. Coraline’s beastly and button-eyed Beldam might be the one most think of, but those familiar with the Sandman series know the true terror of The Corinthian.
The Corinthian is more than just a serial killer with a snazzy pair of sunglasses. He’s a nightmare come to life brought from the dream realm into the mortal plane with an insatiable hunger for bloodshed and carnage. And that’s not even mentioning the teeth behind the shades and his taste for human eyeballs.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

The Heroes (Marvel 1602)

Marvel 1602 was truly a different direction for the earth’s mightiest heroes, and that’s putting it lightly. In Gaiman’s corner of the multiverse, Doctor Strange, Spider-Man, Daredevil, and even the Guardians of the Galaxy all came into existence 500 years earlier in earth’s timeline, resulting in them existing alongside famous figures such as Queen Elizabeth and William Shakespeare.
The plot is standard comic book fare, the heroes fight the villains and save the day, but the way Gaiman weaves in the culture of the era and reimagines familiar characters as completely new personae is absolutely genius.
The Gods (American Gods)

Like the ancient pantheons of old, there are so many gods, goddesses, and other figures inspired by classic mythology that populate the pages of American Gods that it’s hard to pick just one. All of them have some semblance of their former, ancient selves, yet they also have modernized forms that allow them to exist among humans.
Odin is a conman and Anansi is an elderly storyteller, but all the gods are still their mythic selves behind the glamor of their mortal disguises. Through his retelling of these myths, Gaiman clearly shows his devotion to the classic stories of the ancient world.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT6’); });

Shadow Moon (American Gods)

The entirety of American Gods is seen through the eyes of Shadow Moon, and it’s as if Gaiman cast the role for this story perfectly. Shadow is essentially the stand-in for the audience, regardless of whether it’s the book or the TV show. He’s the one that gets to see both the Old Gods and the New Gods in action, and his reactions help move the story.
Although Shadow might react slightly more even-tempered than most upon meeting any form of mythological being, he’s not a boring character by any means. Like Dante through the rings of the inferno, Shadow takes his journey with the many gods and deities who have come to America.
Coraline Jones (Coraline)

Coraline is arguably one of Neil Gaiman’s most famous and possibly scariest works of fiction. This dark fairytale sees the brave Coraline explore a doorway to a secret world hidden in the walls of her house. While there are notes of Alice in Wonderland, such as a talking mysterious cat, there are no Mad Hatters and March Hares here.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT7’); });

Both the book and the movie paint Coraline as a heroic yet human protagonist who overcomes the odds, obstacles, and Other Mother set before her, but she isn’t without her human faults and fears. In short, she’s a very relatable heroine that can reach audiences of any age.
Dream (Sandman)

Regarded by many to be one of the author’s most incredible creations, Sandman rose from the depths of obscurity and into the forefront of Vertigo Comics. Lord of Dreams, Prince of Stories, Sandman, and even more illustrious titles are given to Morpheus, better known as Dream of the Endless.
The Sandman comics and stories have sent Dream across the fabric of reality on many adventures. From encountering members of the Justice League to walking into the front door of Hell itself on the quest for a magic helmet, there’s no denying the versatility and likability of the character.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-0’); });

#Sandman #Neil #Gaiman #Characters


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