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Spider-Man’s Biggest MCU Missed Opportunity Was Captain America’s Fault

It didn’t make a great deal of sense that a connection to Spider-Man was the one noteworthy area that Iron Man and Captain America were simply not equal. Throughout the entire Infinity Saga, Captain America and Iron Man were played up as direct foils to one another while being important members of the Avengers. It showed up as early as their clash during The Avengers and was later epitomized during Captain America: Civil War, where each of them took over the leadership of one faction of the Avengers on either side of the dispute. Yet Iron Man was the only one who had any impact on Spider-Man at all.

While Captain America had Bucky and Sam, the two of them didn’t really represent the same kind of relationship. Steve’s relationship with Bucky was built on a decades-old friendship. While Sam Wilson is the one taking over the role of Captain America after The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, the relationship between him and Steve wasn’t explored as much as between Spider-Man and Iron Man. Even if it were, however, it was fairly clear that there isn’t a sense of mentorship there. Tony essentially believed Peter could be the “new Iron Man.” Then that entire angle was undermined as Peter went his own way, especially after Spider-Man: No Way Home. So instead of trying to make Peter into the next Iron Man, even metaphorically, the relationship should have been more about trying to coach him into becoming a proper hero in his own right, which Captain America easily could have contributed to and gotten his own mentor role out of.

With the Spider-Man: Homecoming trilogy playing around with interpretations of the “Great Responsibility” line, it’s clear that Captain America could have played into Peter’s hero training. The first movie made a much clearer case for the line’s less popular interpretation, which was the responsible application of one’s abilities. Having Iron Man there to reinforce this aspect of the line, especially given his own origin story, made perfect sense. However, the second film more heavily played into the more common interpretation, which was about the moral obligation to act, something that Captain America’s origin story would reinforce perfectly. Spider-Man: No Way Home exhibited examples of both, which could have been the chance to show how both heroes molded him for that moment. If given the chance to interact with Peter more, Captain America could easily have improved the MCU’s Spider-Man movies as another mentor to teach Peter what being a hero is all about.


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Spider-Man’s Biggest MCU Missed Opportunity Was Captain America’s Fault

It didn’t make a great deal of sense that a connection to Spider-Man was the one noteworthy area that Iron Man and Captain America were simply not equal. Throughout the entire Infinity Saga, Captain America and Iron Man were played up as direct foils to one another while being important members of the Avengers. It showed up as early as their clash during The Avengers and was later epitomized during Captain America: Civil War, where each of them took over the leadership of one faction of the Avengers on either side of the dispute. Yet Iron Man was the only one who had any impact on Spider-Man at all.

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While Captain America had Bucky and Sam, the two of them didn’t really represent the same kind of relationship. Steve’s relationship with Bucky was built on a decades-old friendship. While Sam Wilson is the one taking over the role of Captain America after The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, the relationship between him and Steve wasn’t explored as much as between Spider-Man and Iron Man. Even if it were, however, it was fairly clear that there isn’t a sense of mentorship there. Tony essentially believed Peter could be the “new Iron Man.” Then that entire angle was undermined as Peter went his own way, especially after Spider-Man: No Way Home. So instead of trying to make Peter into the next Iron Man, even metaphorically, the relationship should have been more about trying to coach him into becoming a proper hero in his own right, which Captain America easily could have contributed to and gotten his own mentor role out of.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

With the Spider-Man: Homecoming trilogy playing around with interpretations of the “Great Responsibility” line, it’s clear that Captain America could have played into Peter’s hero training. The first movie made a much clearer case for the line’s less popular interpretation, which was the responsible application of one’s abilities. Having Iron Man there to reinforce this aspect of the line, especially given his own origin story, made perfect sense. However, the second film more heavily played into the more common interpretation, which was about the moral obligation to act, something that Captain America’s origin story would reinforce perfectly. Spider-Man: No Way Home exhibited examples of both, which could have been the chance to show how both heroes molded him for that moment. If given the chance to interact with Peter more, Captain America could easily have improved the MCU’s Spider-Man movies as another mentor to teach Peter what being a hero is all about.

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#SpiderMans #Biggest #MCU #Missed #Opportunity #Captain #Americas #Fault

Spider-Man’s Biggest MCU Missed Opportunity Was Captain America’s Fault

It didn’t make a great deal of sense that a connection to Spider-Man was the one noteworthy area that Iron Man and Captain America were simply not equal. Throughout the entire Infinity Saga, Captain America and Iron Man were played up as direct foils to one another while being important members of the Avengers. It showed up as early as their clash during The Avengers and was later epitomized during Captain America: Civil War, where each of them took over the leadership of one faction of the Avengers on either side of the dispute. Yet Iron Man was the only one who had any impact on Spider-Man at all.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

While Captain America had Bucky and Sam, the two of them didn’t really represent the same kind of relationship. Steve’s relationship with Bucky was built on a decades-old friendship. While Sam Wilson is the one taking over the role of Captain America after The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, the relationship between him and Steve wasn’t explored as much as between Spider-Man and Iron Man. Even if it were, however, it was fairly clear that there isn’t a sense of mentorship there. Tony essentially believed Peter could be the “new Iron Man.” Then that entire angle was undermined as Peter went his own way, especially after Spider-Man: No Way Home. So instead of trying to make Peter into the next Iron Man, even metaphorically, the relationship should have been more about trying to coach him into becoming a proper hero in his own right, which Captain America easily could have contributed to and gotten his own mentor role out of.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

With the Spider-Man: Homecoming trilogy playing around with interpretations of the “Great Responsibility” line, it’s clear that Captain America could have played into Peter’s hero training. The first movie made a much clearer case for the line’s less popular interpretation, which was the responsible application of one’s abilities. Having Iron Man there to reinforce this aspect of the line, especially given his own origin story, made perfect sense. However, the second film more heavily played into the more common interpretation, which was about the moral obligation to act, something that Captain America’s origin story would reinforce perfectly. Spider-Man: No Way Home exhibited examples of both, which could have been the chance to show how both heroes molded him for that moment. If given the chance to interact with Peter more, Captain America could easily have improved the MCU’s Spider-Man movies as another mentor to teach Peter what being a hero is all about.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-bta’); });

#SpiderMans #Biggest #MCU #Missed #Opportunity #Captain #Americas #Fault


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