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The 10 best Tom Clancy games of all time

There are many things to consider when choosing the best Tom Clancy game. There have been over 35 since Tom Clancy’s name was first stamped on the box in 1998. Even before that, there were games based on his novels. This includes Commodore 64 and Hunt for Red October based 1987 Amiga games. I had to draw a line somewhere, so I’m sticking with Tom Clancy’s, the official Ubisoft title for this list.

The fact that the series is still going strong in 2022 is a testament to the various studios working under the Ubisoft and Clancy brands. This year we had Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Extraction, there are two free-to-play titles based on Clancy passages, and we’re also working on a spinoff of The Division.

10. Tom Clancy’s End War

Tom Clancy's End War

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

Endwar deceived us all. When voice commands were still painfully cool, Ubi showed off this set of fully voice-playable strategy games in the world of Clancy. This was clearly a recipe for disaster, as frustrated generals around the world began adding increasingly powerful curses to their orders whenever the game was messed up. But behind it all is a great strategy game with delightfully well-designed maps that you can scrape. Going back to the Pad is far from an ideal solution, but it does mean you can almost certainly enjoy one of the few RTS titles that actually work on consoles. As you know, before XCOM: Enemy Unknown came out, everyone admitted defeat.

9. Tom Clancy’s The Division

First of all, the division seems to try to do a lot of different things, but it doesn’t excel at any of them. Then the truth will come out. Destiny with cover system and beanie hat. The division makes a lot more sense after that point. If you approach it with that Destiny mindset, you’re bound to have a good time. For example, a search mission to find loot can be a daunting task, but not when bringing in a friend. Adjust the difficulty according to your skill. The Dark Zone is the most unique part of The Division, playing like DayZ with a PvP option in the center of the map. Gear balancing issues aside, there’s still the uniquely tense thrill of staging another group of agents and evaluating them as potential allies or enemies while knowing they’re doing the same to you.

8. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Shadow Wars

Tom Clancy's Shadow Wars

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

The Nintendo 3DS is not ideally suited to the strengths of the Tom Clancy series. No slick presentation like the best of Splinter Cells, no powerful networking features really suited to the Rainbow Six, and no snipers in general have ever felt good on Nintendo’s handhelds. But Ghost Recon Shadow Wars is a monster from the Tom Clancy Pantheon. Shadow Wars isn’t a slow multiplayer shooter, it’s a tactical RPG where you’ll get close encounters with a handful of experts with bite-sized small battles. It’s a turn-based XCOM-like game, although it perfectly captures both the thrilling tension of a well-executed plan and the brutal play of a Ghost Recon game. These XCOM traits, frankly, apply to Shadow Wars as well. It was the last game XCOM creator Julian Gollop submitted to Ubisoft.

7. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Vegas

Given the somewhat niche concept of R6 Vegas, it’s surprising that Ubi squeezed a few games out. In fact, it is quite significant that the first of them was the best. While the settings add glamor and glamour, new gameplay features make it feel like the first Rainbow Six title to be truly optimized for consoles. Regenerative health, third-person blind shooter view, and context-sensitive squad commands (d-pad) give less hardcore gamers a more enticing shooter bang experience. There’s no doubt that this dulls the series’ appeal to some, but everything is still wild enough and military enough to satisfy. But again, bringing the second game back to Sin City without any substantial improvements was probably a bad idea. Does it persist today? Well, but shouldn’t you be playing Siege instead?

6. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon (2001)

Ghost Recon (2001)

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

Ok, so the original Ghost Recon doesn’t really live up to today’s standards. It’s a pretty slow and ugly game where tactical shooting doesn’t make up for its visual and presentation flaws. But as we entered the millennium, this was an early stage for PC gaming. Despite the fact that the game is a half-orienteering simulation, half-shooter, it’s surprisingly “authentic”, has great set pieces, and really rewards patience and smart tactical thinking. Games like Operation Flashpoint and ArmA took painfully slow military shooters to the highest level, but this was the right face to indulge in your spec ops side.

5. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Extraction

Rainbow Six Extract

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

Originally titled Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Quarantine, this Rainbow Six Siege incorporates a parasitic alien called Archaeans into a tactical shooter. At the worst moments, the game may repeat itself, but at the best moments it will terrify you. Whether you’re old-school Clancy Stan or new to his world, as part of the REACT team (which is, of course, the Rainbow Exogenous Analysis and Containment Team), defeat the evil ET with your friends adds a whole new dimension to Clancy’s passages. Added a new dimension.

4. Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Conviction

This was a new stealth method when it finally appeared in 2010. Promised “Man-with-the-newspaper”, the aggressive, fast-paced camouflage is unlike anything you’ll find in the game. Fluid movement around an independent stage ties together the increasingly startling takedowns of grunts that remain. The abilities feel really good, okay, so the story isn’t the best in the series (despite the rather memorable scene where you forcefully attach a man’s hand to a tree stump with a fighting knife), but if the action is this smooth, it’s almost impossible. It doesn’t matter, and don’t forget the fantastic thrilling co-op mode where you finish before your friend kills you.

3. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands

Ghost Recon Wildlands

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

If you’ve ever played mercenary games, remember the fun of tracking and expertly neutralizing high-value targets in safe compounds. Or simply launch huge fuel-air bombs across the entire site. Ghost Recon Wildlands step back from airdropped guns to sing all about these open world surgical strikes. A team of four (co-op mode or AI buddies) can sneak into drug cartel facilities and quietly eliminate them, smash doors with explosives and machine guns, or do all the dirty work in the nearby hills with your trusty sniper. rifle . If you can build an entire squad, Wildlands is one of the funniest games in the Clancy-verse.

2. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege

The High Caliber update for Rainbow Six® Siege arrives on November 30th.

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

Siege received several mediocre reviews and drew a smaller audience than Ubi expected, but time and the incredible community surrounding it will attest to the brilliance of this tense and intimate shooter. The core mode, Siege, is very finely tuned and the map is very sparsely designed, making for a beautiful game through its violent simplicity. 5v5 – One team defends and the other sneaks. A few gadgets and gadgets essentially add flavor to the battle of wit and cleverness between the two teams. But the best thing about Siege is the possibility of an epic 5v1 final, where the lone survivor of the struggling team alone wipes out entire foes to the gasps and cheers of their teammates as the lone survivor of the struggling team watches. This moment is one of the rarest jewels in the game, and makes it a truly invaluable experience.

1. Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Chaos Theory

There are many reasons why Chaos Theory is the best Clancy game ever. First of all, Maximum Clancy. The storyline focuses on a global clash of shadows that threatens to plunge the world into a new war. This dark and suspenseful game is packed with twists and turns to keep you immersed, and the protagonist, Sam Fisher, is smart enough to get James Bond’s Q sleepless nights, so more than ever. Agile (despite getting older). But the star of the show is Spies vs Mercs, the most sublime, tightest, and most exhilarating multiplayer mode. There’s something very nicely balanced about it. A spy’s third-person view balances their relative vulnerability, while a mercenary’s lethality is reasonably mitigated from a first-person view. Spies vs Mercs produces more gasps, punches, and gallons of sweat per game than any other online experience. Actually. Ish. Unfortunately the game’s delightful graphics are a bit outdated and Spies vs Mercs is no longer playable on console (servers are down), but it remains the pinnacle of all Clancy games to this day.

The Division® movie is also coming, so check them all out. Upcoming video game movies After 2022.


More information

The 10 best Tom Clancy games of all time

When you’re choosing the best Tom Clancy games, you’ve got plenty to work with. There have been more than 35 since that Tom Clancy name was first stamped on a box in 1998. Even before that, there were games based on his fiction, including a Commodore 64 and Amiga game in 1987 based on The Hunt for Red October. We’re sticking to the official, “Tom Clancy’s” titled Ubisoft games for this list, because we had to draw a line somewhere.
It’s a testament to Ubisoft and the various studios that have worked on the Clancy brand that the series is still going strong in 2022. This year we’ve had Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Extraction, and there are two free-to-play titles in the works based in the Clancy-verse and a The Division spin-off in the works too. 
10. Tom Clancy’s Endwar

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
Endwar made fools of us all. When voice commands were still achingly cool, Ubi dished up this strategy game from the Clancy universe that you could play entirely vocally. Obviously that was a recipe for disaster, as frustrated armchair generals all over the world started inserting increasingly strong swears into their orders when the game fudged it all up. However, underneath all that is a fine strategy game with some delightfully well-designed maps to scrap in. Reverting to pad is a far from ideal solution, but it means you get to almost enjoy one of the few RTS titles that actually worked on console. Y’know, before XCOM: Enemy Unknown showed up and everyone just conceded defeat.
9. Tom Clancy’s The Division

At first, The Division feels like it’s trying to do a lot of different things and not quite excelling at any of them. Then the truth dawns upon you: this is Destiny with a cover system and beanie caps. The Division makes so much more sense after that point, and if you approach it with that Destiny mindset, you’re bound to have a good time: for instance, grinding through missions for loot can be a chore, but not if you bring along friends and tweak the difficulty to match your skills. The Dark Zone is by far The Division’s most unique aspect, playing like a little PvP-optional DayZ right in the middle of the map. Gear balance issues aside, it’s still a uniquely tense thrill to stumble on another group of agents and size them up as potential allies or enemies, knowing they’re doing the same to you.
8. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Shadow Wars

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
The Nintendo 3DS is not ideally suited to the strengths of any Tom Clancy series. No fancy presentation like the best Splinter Cells, no robust networking features to truly suit Rainbow Six, and shooters in general have never felt great on Nintendo’s handhelds. Ghost Recon Shadow Wars, however, is a freak in the Tom Clancy pantheon. Rather than a slow-paced multiplayer shooter, Shadow Wars is a tactics RPG whose bite-sized skirmishes place you in taut standoffs with a handful of specialists. It handily captures both the succulent tension of a well-executed plan and the brute theatricality of full scale Ghost Recon games, but as a turn-based XCOM-alike. Those XCOM qualities come to Shadow Wars honestly too; it was the last game XCOM creator Julian Gollop turned in for Ubisoft.
7. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Vegas

Given the rather niche concept of R6 Vegas, it’s amazing that Ubi squeezed a couple of games out of it. In fact, it’s rather telling that the first of them was the best. While the setting provides the glitz and glamour, the fresh gameplay features make this feel like the first Rainbow Six title truly optimised for console. Regenerating health, a third-person view for blind-firing, and context sensitive squad commands (on the d-pad) all make for a shooty-bang-bang experience that’s a little more sympathetic to the less hardcore player. While this undoubtedly softens the series’ appeal for some, the whole thing is still tough and military enough to satisfy. Again, though, it was probably a poor idea to bring the second game back to the city of sin without any real improvements. Does it hold up today? Well, kinda, but shouldn’t you be playing Siege instead?
6. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon (2001)

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
Ok, so, the original Ghost Recon doesn’t really hold up by today’s standards. It’s a rather slow, rather ugly game where the tactical shooting doesn’t quite make up for the visual and presentation shortcomings. But back at the turn of the millennium, this was primo-PC gaming. Didn’t matter that the game is half orienteering sim, half shooter – it’s wonderfully ‘authentic’, has some excellent set-pieces, and genuinely rewards patience and smart tactical thinking. Games like Operation Flashpoint and ArmA pushed the painfully-slow military shooter to their zenith, but this was the acceptable face of indulging your spec-ops side.
5. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Extraction

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
Originally titled Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Quarantine, this Rainbow Six Siege spin-off threw some parasitic aliens called Archæans into the tactical shooter mix. In its worst moments, the game can get repetitive, but in its best moments, it will scare the bejesus out of you. Whether you’re an old-school Clancy stan or new to his world,  taking down evil ETs with your friends as part of the REACT (that’s Rainbow Exogenous Analysis and Containment Team, obviously) squad adds a whole new dimension to the Clancy-verse. 
4. Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Conviction

This was a new breed of sneaking when it finally appeared, battered and bruised from a troubled development cycle, in 2010. Originally pitched as Sam Fisher meets Jason Bourne, the end product wasn’t quite as free-flowing and ‘murder-a-man-with-a-newspaper’ as promised, but the aggressive, fast-paced stealth was unlike anything seen in games. The ability to string together takedowns, increasingly terrifying the remaining grunts, in fluid motions around each self-contained stage just feels so, so good to play. Ok, the story isn’t the finest in the series (despite the rather memorable scene where you forcefully attach a man’s hand to a tree-stump with your combat knife), but when the action is this smooth that barely matters. And let’s not forget the fantastically tense co-op mode, which climaxes in the order to terminate your buddy before they kill you.
3. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
If you ever played the Mercenaries games, you remember the fun of tracking down high-value targets in secure compounds and expertly neutralizing them. Or just calling down a massive fuel-air bomb on the whole premises. Ghost Recon Wildlands backs off from the air-dropped ordnance in favor of making everything about those open-world surgical strikes sing. Teams of four (either in co-op or with AI buddies) can sneak into drug cartel facilities for silent takedowns, smash down the gates with explosives and machine guns, or do all the dirty work from a nearby hilltop with their trusty sniper rifles. If you can get a full squad together, Wildlands is some of the most fun you’ll ever have in the Clancy-verse.
2. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
While Siege received several middling reviews and attracted a smaller audience than Ubi might have hoped, time and the amazing communities that have built up around it will testify to the brilliance of this tense, intimate shooter. The core mode – Siege – is so finely tuned, the maps so economically designed, they create a game beautiful through its violent simplicity. Five versus five – one team defends, the other infiltrates. A sprinkling of gadgets and tools add flavour to what is, essentially, a battle of wits and smarts between two teams. But the absolute best thing about Siege is the potential for an epic five vs one finish, with the sole survivor on a struggling team wiping out the entire opposition force by themselves, to the sound of gasps and cheers from their spectating comrades. Those moments are the rarest of gaming gems, and they make this a precious experience, indeed.
1. Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Chaos Theory

There are so many reasons why Chaos Theory is the best Clancy game out there. For starters, it’s maximum Clancy – the plot focuses on a global shadow conflict that threatens to plunge the world into a new war. It’s a dark, tense game, with enough plot twists and set-pieces to keep you gripped, and leading man Sam Fisher is more agile (despite being older) than ever, packing enough smart gadgets to give James Bond’s Q sleepless nights. However, the star of the show is the Spies vs Mercs mode, which is the most sublime, taut, and thrilling multiplayer you’re likely to experience. There’s something so wonderfully balanced about it – the third-person perspective of the spies offsetting their relative fragility, while the lethality of the mercs feels sensibly restrained by the first-person view. Spies vs Mercs is responsible for more gasps, fist-pumps, and liters of sweat shed per game than any other online experience. Fact. Ish. Sadly, the game’s delightful visuals have aged a little, and Spies vs Mercs can no longer be played on console (the servers have been switched off), but this remains the high-watermark for all Clancy games to date.
There’s a The Division movie coming too, so check out all the upcoming video game movies for 2022 and beyond.

#Tom #Clancy #games #time

The 10 best Tom Clancy games of all time

When you’re choosing the best Tom Clancy games, you’ve got plenty to work with. There have been more than 35 since that Tom Clancy name was first stamped on a box in 1998. Even before that, there were games based on his fiction, including a Commodore 64 and Amiga game in 1987 based on The Hunt for Red October. We’re sticking to the official, “Tom Clancy’s” titled Ubisoft games for this list, because we had to draw a line somewhere.
It’s a testament to Ubisoft and the various studios that have worked on the Clancy brand that the series is still going strong in 2022. This year we’ve had Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Extraction, and there are two free-to-play titles in the works based in the Clancy-verse and a The Division spin-off in the works too. 
10. Tom Clancy’s Endwar

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
Endwar made fools of us all. When voice commands were still achingly cool, Ubi dished up this strategy game from the Clancy universe that you could play entirely vocally. Obviously that was a recipe for disaster, as frustrated armchair generals all over the world started inserting increasingly strong swears into their orders when the game fudged it all up. However, underneath all that is a fine strategy game with some delightfully well-designed maps to scrap in. Reverting to pad is a far from ideal solution, but it means you get to almost enjoy one of the few RTS titles that actually worked on console. Y’know, before XCOM: Enemy Unknown showed up and everyone just conceded defeat.
9. Tom Clancy’s The Division

At first, The Division feels like it’s trying to do a lot of different things and not quite excelling at any of them. Then the truth dawns upon you: this is Destiny with a cover system and beanie caps. The Division makes so much more sense after that point, and if you approach it with that Destiny mindset, you’re bound to have a good time: for instance, grinding through missions for loot can be a chore, but not if you bring along friends and tweak the difficulty to match your skills. The Dark Zone is by far The Division’s most unique aspect, playing like a little PvP-optional DayZ right in the middle of the map. Gear balance issues aside, it’s still a uniquely tense thrill to stumble on another group of agents and size them up as potential allies or enemies, knowing they’re doing the same to you.
8. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Shadow Wars

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
The Nintendo 3DS is not ideally suited to the strengths of any Tom Clancy series. No fancy presentation like the best Splinter Cells, no robust networking features to truly suit Rainbow Six, and shooters in general have never felt great on Nintendo’s handhelds. Ghost Recon Shadow Wars, however, is a freak in the Tom Clancy pantheon. Rather than a slow-paced multiplayer shooter, Shadow Wars is a tactics RPG whose bite-sized skirmishes place you in taut standoffs with a handful of specialists. It handily captures both the succulent tension of a well-executed plan and the brute theatricality of full scale Ghost Recon games, but as a turn-based XCOM-alike. Those XCOM qualities come to Shadow Wars honestly too; it was the last game XCOM creator Julian Gollop turned in for Ubisoft.
7. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Vegas

Given the rather niche concept of R6 Vegas, it’s amazing that Ubi squeezed a couple of games out of it. In fact, it’s rather telling that the first of them was the best. While the setting provides the glitz and glamour, the fresh gameplay features make this feel like the first Rainbow Six title truly optimised for console. Regenerating health, a third-person view for blind-firing, and context sensitive squad commands (on the d-pad) all make for a shooty-bang-bang experience that’s a little more sympathetic to the less hardcore player. While this undoubtedly softens the series’ appeal for some, the whole thing is still tough and military enough to satisfy. Again, though, it was probably a poor idea to bring the second game back to the city of sin without any real improvements. Does it hold up today? Well, kinda, but shouldn’t you be playing Siege instead?
6. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon (2001)

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
Ok, so, the original Ghost Recon doesn’t really hold up by today’s standards. It’s a rather slow, rather ugly game where the tactical shooting doesn’t quite make up for the visual and presentation shortcomings. But back at the turn of the millennium, this was primo-PC gaming. Didn’t matter that the game is half orienteering sim, half shooter – it’s wonderfully ‘authentic’, has some excellent set-pieces, and genuinely rewards patience and smart tactical thinking. Games like Operation Flashpoint and ArmA pushed the painfully-slow military shooter to their zenith, but this was the acceptable face of indulging your spec-ops side.
5. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Extraction

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
Originally titled Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Quarantine, this Rainbow Six Siege spin-off threw some parasitic aliens called Archæans into the tactical shooter mix. In its worst moments, the game can get repetitive, but in its best moments, it will scare the bejesus out of you. Whether you’re an old-school Clancy stan or new to his world,  taking down evil ETs with your friends as part of the REACT (that’s Rainbow Exogenous Analysis and Containment Team, obviously) squad adds a whole new dimension to the Clancy-verse. 
4. Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Conviction

This was a new breed of sneaking when it finally appeared, battered and bruised from a troubled development cycle, in 2010. Originally pitched as Sam Fisher meets Jason Bourne, the end product wasn’t quite as free-flowing and ‘murder-a-man-with-a-newspaper’ as promised, but the aggressive, fast-paced stealth was unlike anything seen in games. The ability to string together takedowns, increasingly terrifying the remaining grunts, in fluid motions around each self-contained stage just feels so, so good to play. Ok, the story isn’t the finest in the series (despite the rather memorable scene where you forcefully attach a man’s hand to a tree-stump with your combat knife), but when the action is this smooth that barely matters. And let’s not forget the fantastically tense co-op mode, which climaxes in the order to terminate your buddy before they kill you.
3. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
If you ever played the Mercenaries games, you remember the fun of tracking down high-value targets in secure compounds and expertly neutralizing them. Or just calling down a massive fuel-air bomb on the whole premises. Ghost Recon Wildlands backs off from the air-dropped ordnance in favor of making everything about those open-world surgical strikes sing. Teams of four (either in co-op or with AI buddies) can sneak into drug cartel facilities for silent takedowns, smash down the gates with explosives and machine guns, or do all the dirty work from a nearby hilltop with their trusty sniper rifles. If you can get a full squad together, Wildlands is some of the most fun you’ll ever have in the Clancy-verse.
2. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
While Siege received several middling reviews and attracted a smaller audience than Ubi might have hoped, time and the amazing communities that have built up around it will testify to the brilliance of this tense, intimate shooter. The core mode – Siege – is so finely tuned, the maps so economically designed, they create a game beautiful through its violent simplicity. Five versus five – one team defends, the other infiltrates. A sprinkling of gadgets and tools add flavour to what is, essentially, a battle of wits and smarts between two teams. But the absolute best thing about Siege is the potential for an epic five vs one finish, with the sole survivor on a struggling team wiping out the entire opposition force by themselves, to the sound of gasps and cheers from their spectating comrades. Those moments are the rarest of gaming gems, and they make this a precious experience, indeed.
1. Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Chaos Theory

There are so many reasons why Chaos Theory is the best Clancy game out there. For starters, it’s maximum Clancy – the plot focuses on a global shadow conflict that threatens to plunge the world into a new war. It’s a dark, tense game, with enough plot twists and set-pieces to keep you gripped, and leading man Sam Fisher is more agile (despite being older) than ever, packing enough smart gadgets to give James Bond’s Q sleepless nights. However, the star of the show is the Spies vs Mercs mode, which is the most sublime, taut, and thrilling multiplayer you’re likely to experience. There’s something so wonderfully balanced about it – the third-person perspective of the spies offsetting their relative fragility, while the lethality of the mercs feels sensibly restrained by the first-person view. Spies vs Mercs is responsible for more gasps, fist-pumps, and liters of sweat shed per game than any other online experience. Fact. Ish. Sadly, the game’s delightful visuals have aged a little, and Spies vs Mercs can no longer be played on console (the servers have been switched off), but this remains the high-watermark for all Clancy games to date.
There’s a The Division movie coming too, so check out all the upcoming video game movies for 2022 and beyond.

#Tom #Clancy #games #time


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