Game

The Iron Oath might be the next great turn-based tactics game

world of iron oath It is dark and full of bloodshed and betrayal. I am leading a mercenary corps, and my mission went wrong, and the man I trusted left me dead and is seeking revenge. I have real issues to deal with, like keeping gold and supplies flowing. But I also have to deal with a much slower and more frightening resource: the passage of time and the terrible price it inflicts on my mercenaries. But I’ve already learned how to adapt best by always being the worst.

Polygon Picks This is how we support our favorite games. We give the game the Polygon Recommends badge because we think the title is uniquely thought-provoking, entertaining, creative, or entertaining and worthy of an addition to our schedule. To see what works best for your platform of choice, visit: polygon essential.

iron oath Fans of strategy games and RPGs will be very familiar in some ways. you pinch darkest dungeonThrow in some XCOM and sprinkle some. Divinity: Original Sin. Cook it all in one fan with stunning pixel animations, epic sheet music, an apocalyptic fantasy world, and ingenious demonic enemy designs.

Traveling through the fantasy realm of Caelum, I must navigate between open worlds, towns and cities, dungeons, and individual battles. It would be easy to blend these things into indistinguishable numbers and goals, but developer Curious Panda Games gradually introduces each level of complexity through meticulous tutorials and early hours of the campaign. There are also surprisingly granular difficulty settings. iron oath It can be a relatively chilly walk or a relentless trek through dangerous areas.

Iron Oath - Battle between mercenaries and bandits

Image: Curious Panda Games/Humble Games

Luckily, the game gives you the tools to succeed in this dangerous world. Because the mercenaries at my disposal are powerful mages, rangers, warriors and animists. Discharging a charged current at an enemy or sending a Valkyrie to the enemy with a spear first is deeply satisfying. When I broke out of the game intro and invaded the open world with an early mercenary party, I was pretty sure I’d be able to catch up and get my revenge on the useless guy who stabbed me in the back.

Of course, nothing was so simple, so my story diverged as I met different factions, explored new cities and expanded my company. This is an Early Access game, but it’s still the amount of meat on the bone. Players can upgrade and customize each mercenary in the party and send their favorite mercenaries on more missions for XP. The downside is that the more you rely on a handful of selected mercenaries, the more stress and hurt you get. Continuing to depend on them can drive you crazy. If the injury is not treated, it can result in death. as well as darkest dungeon, it is a tough performance. My company drinks a beer every now and then, but I’m more commonly treated for skull fractures, trauma, and vertebral fractures.

And even if you do everything “correctly,” as with all of us, the clock is ticking. This isn’t a Fire Emblem title where everyone has rosy cheeks and bright eyes. they eventually die. You can always recruit new mercenaries, level them up, customize them, and upgrade your company to make crew management easier. But by juggling gold and potions, I learn to treat human life with the same sober practicality. These are not my comrades. investment.

Image: Curious Panda Games/Humble Games

This is especially true in battles such as: iron oath It really shines. When you enter the dungeon, you get an abstract overview. I can scout forward, disarm traps, and explore. As for combat, let’s go straight to the point. My 4 mercenaries are placed on a grid with some enemies. Then you decide on your initial placement and start your strategy. Sides, covers and positioning are all important. Enemies usually have brutal damage abilities and debuffs that can wreak havoc if I don’t plan around. My powerful spells and attacks also limited the charge for the duration of the dungeon. In other words, you have to ration in many fights.

The constant tensions, limited supply, and constant risk of resource management mean I have to make some rough choices from time to time. Penetrate above. For example, in a dark dungeon I find an injured person. I can help him, but it gives enemies more time to set up traps and ambush. I can give him some of my valuable medical supplies so he can escape on his own. Or… you can kill him and loot his body! This may annoy some of my mercenaries, but others will think it’s just clever. Would you like to gift a healing potion to a stranger? to this business?

In Iron Oath, mercenaries fight demons on the battlefield.  The character moves away from the enemy.

Image: Curious Panda Games/Humble Games

If you make too many decisions that the mercenaries don’t like (or don’t pay the mercenaries… had To spend all my gold on gear) they will leave the company entirely. Angry and weary mercenaries are less useful in combat, so if they get injured or a friend dies, their morale may deteriorate.

The biggest problem of all my time is iron oath User interface. It’s a collection of little annoyances that individually seem insignificant, but that accumulates over time. For example, there is no easy way to see your character’s health at a glance while reviewing battles during combat. Their portrait overlay has a red shadow indicating total HP loss. Or you can hover over it to get the full name and health bar. Take care of the rest of the dungeon. In other cases, I accidentally closed the upgrade screen and it took me a while to find it again. None of these are dealbreakers (especially in early access games), but they’re garbage nonetheless.

Overall, I’m curious how iron oath developed; Curious Panda Games has already outlined a roadmap for 2022 leading to a final full release that includes new classes, more points of interest, and more quests. I’m currently having a lot of fun with the current build. On the other hand, my mercenaries will be a bit dissatisfied with my management style.

iron oath Released on April 19th window Personal computer games have been verified using download codes provided by Humble Games. Vox Media has affiliate partnerships. Vox Media may receive commissions for products purchased through affiliate links, but does not affect editorial content. you can find For more information on Polygon’s Ethics Policy, please click here..


More information

The Iron Oath might be the next great turn-based tactics game

The world of The Iron Oath is grim, full of bloodshed and betrayal. I am leading a company of mercenaries, seeking revenge after a mission went bad and a man I trusted left me to die. I have practical concerns to deal with, like maintaining my influx of gold and supplies. But I also have a much slower, more dreadful resource to manage: the passage of time, and with it, the terrible toll it takes on my mercenaries. I’ve already learned the best way to adapt, though — by just being the absolute worst person, all of the time.

Polygon Recommends is our way of endorsing our favorite games. When we award a game the Polygon Recommends badge, it’s because we believe the title is uniquely thought-provoking, entertaining, inventive, or fun — and worth fitting into your schedule. If you want to see the very best of the best for your platform(s) of choice, check out Polygon Essentials.
The Iron Oath will be, in some ways, very familiar to fans of strategy games and RPGs. You take a pinch of Darkest Dungeon, throw in some XCOM, and sprinkle in some Divinity: Original Sin. Cook it all in a pan with some gorgeous pixel animations, an epic musical score, a fantasy world constantly on the cusp of an apocalypse, and inventive demonic enemy designs, and baby, you’ve got a stew going.
As I adventure around the fantasy realm of Caelum, I have to navigate between the open world, cities and towns, dungeons, and individual battles. It would be easy for these things to blur together into an indistinguishable mush of numbers and goals, but developer Curious Panda Games introduces each layer of complexity gradually throughout a well-paced tutorial and the early hours of the campaign. There are also some wonderfully granular difficulty settings, so The Iron Oath can either be a relatively chill cakewalk or an unforgiving trek through hazardous territory.

Image: Curious Panda Games/Humble Games
Luckily, the game gives me the tools to succeed in this dangerous world because the mercenaries at my disposal are powerful wizards, rangers, warriors, and elementalists. It’s deeply satisfying to unleash a charged electrical torrent on an enemy or have a valkyrie soar through her enemies, spear first. By the time I was out of the game’s intro and into the open world with my starting mercenary party, I felt pretty confident that I would be able to catch up to the ne’er-do-well who stabbed me in the back and get revenge.
Of course, nothing is ever that simple, and so my story branched out as I met other factions, explored new cities, and expanded my company. This is an early access game, but there’s still a good amount of meat on the bone. Players can upgrade and customize each mercenary in their party, and send their favorites out on more missions for XP. The drawback is that the more you lean on a select few mercenaries, the more stressed and injured they become. Keep relying on them, and they might just snap. Fail to treat their injuries, and they might die. Just like Darkest Dungeon, this is a rough gig. My company gets a round of ale once in a while, but they’re more often treated to skull fractures, trauma, and broken spines.
And even if you do everything “right,” the clock is ticking, as it is for us all. This isn’t a Fire Emblem title where everyone remains rosy-cheeked and bright-eyed; they eventually pass away. There are always new mercenaries to recruit, level up, and customize, and I can upgrade my company to make managing the crew easier … but as I juggle gold and potions, I learn to start treating human life with the same cold practicality. These aren’t my comrades — they’re investments.

Image: Curious Panda Games/Humble Games
This is especially true in battles, which is where The Iron Oath really shines. When I head into a dungeon, I get an abstracted overview. I can scout ahead, disarm traps, and explore. When combat happens, we get right to business; my four mercenaries are placed on a grid along with some enemies. I then decide my initial placement, and the strategy begins. Flanking, cover, and positioning are all important; the enemy is usually equipped with brutal damage abilities and debuffs that can cause chaos if I don’t plan around it. My powerful spells and attacks also have limited charges for the duration of the dungeon, which means I have to ration across many battles.
This constant tension of resource management, limited supplies, and continual danger means that I sometimes have to make some rough choices — choices that my mercenaries will have thoughts about. For instance, in the depths of a dark dungeon, I find an injured man. I can help him out of there, but that will give my enemies more time to set up traps and ambushes. I can give him some of my precious medical supplies so he can escape on his own. Or … I could just kill him and loot his body! That might aggravate some of my mercenaries, but others will think that’s just smart. Giving away health potions to strangers? In this economy?

Image: Curious Panda Games/Humble Games
If I make too many choices that my mercenaries don’t like (or if I don’t pay them because I just had to spend all of my gold on gear) they’ll leave the company altogether. Angry, tired mercenaries are also less useful in battle, which can cause a spiral in morale as they get injured or their friends die.
The biggest issue throughout my time with The Iron Oath is the UI. It’s a collection of little annoyances that don’t seem to matter individually, but they pile up over time. For instance, during battles, there’s no easy way to see my characters’ health at a glance as I survey the battle. Their portrait overlays will have a red shadow that represents their general HP loss, or I can hover over them with my cursor to get a full name and health bar — but neither of these are ideal when I’m also trying to suss out all the enemy information and terrain, while also worrying about the remainder of the dungeon. At other times, I accidentally closed out of upgrade screens, and it took me a while to find them again. None of these are deal breakers (especially in an early access game) but they’re bummers nonetheless.
Overall, I’m excited to see how The Iron Oath develops; Curious Panda Games has already laid out a road map throughout 2022 leading to an eventual full release that includes a new class, more points of interest, and more quests. For now, I’m having a lot of fun with the current build — my mercenaries, on the other hand, probably have some complaints with my management style.
The Iron Oath was released on April 19 on Windows PC. The game was reviewed using a download code provided by Humble Games. Vox Media has affiliate partnerships. These do not influence editorial content, though Vox Media may earn commissions for products purchased via affiliate links. You can find additional information about Polygon’s ethics policy here.

#Iron #Oath #great #turnbased #tactics #game

The Iron Oath might be the next great turn-based tactics game

The world of The Iron Oath is grim, full of bloodshed and betrayal. I am leading a company of mercenaries, seeking revenge after a mission went bad and a man I trusted left me to die. I have practical concerns to deal with, like maintaining my influx of gold and supplies. But I also have a much slower, more dreadful resource to manage: the passage of time, and with it, the terrible toll it takes on my mercenaries. I’ve already learned the best way to adapt, though — by just being the absolute worst person, all of the time.

Polygon Recommends is our way of endorsing our favorite games. When we award a game the Polygon Recommends badge, it’s because we believe the title is uniquely thought-provoking, entertaining, inventive, or fun — and worth fitting into your schedule. If you want to see the very best of the best for your platform(s) of choice, check out Polygon Essentials.
The Iron Oath will be, in some ways, very familiar to fans of strategy games and RPGs. You take a pinch of Darkest Dungeon, throw in some XCOM, and sprinkle in some Divinity: Original Sin. Cook it all in a pan with some gorgeous pixel animations, an epic musical score, a fantasy world constantly on the cusp of an apocalypse, and inventive demonic enemy designs, and baby, you’ve got a stew going.
As I adventure around the fantasy realm of Caelum, I have to navigate between the open world, cities and towns, dungeons, and individual battles. It would be easy for these things to blur together into an indistinguishable mush of numbers and goals, but developer Curious Panda Games introduces each layer of complexity gradually throughout a well-paced tutorial and the early hours of the campaign. There are also some wonderfully granular difficulty settings, so The Iron Oath can either be a relatively chill cakewalk or an unforgiving trek through hazardous territory.

Image: Curious Panda Games/Humble Games
Luckily, the game gives me the tools to succeed in this dangerous world because the mercenaries at my disposal are powerful wizards, rangers, warriors, and elementalists. It’s deeply satisfying to unleash a charged electrical torrent on an enemy or have a valkyrie soar through her enemies, spear first. By the time I was out of the game’s intro and into the open world with my starting mercenary party, I felt pretty confident that I would be able to catch up to the ne’er-do-well who stabbed me in the back and get revenge.
Of course, nothing is ever that simple, and so my story branched out as I met other factions, explored new cities, and expanded my company. This is an early access game, but there’s still a good amount of meat on the bone. Players can upgrade and customize each mercenary in their party, and send their favorites out on more missions for XP. The drawback is that the more you lean on a select few mercenaries, the more stressed and injured they become. Keep relying on them, and they might just snap. Fail to treat their injuries, and they might die. Just like Darkest Dungeon, this is a rough gig. My company gets a round of ale once in a while, but they’re more often treated to skull fractures, trauma, and broken spines.
And even if you do everything “right,” the clock is ticking, as it is for us all. This isn’t a Fire Emblem title where everyone remains rosy-cheeked and bright-eyed; they eventually pass away. There are always new mercenaries to recruit, level up, and customize, and I can upgrade my company to make managing the crew easier … but as I juggle gold and potions, I learn to start treating human life with the same cold practicality. These aren’t my comrades — they’re investments.

Image: Curious Panda Games/Humble Games
This is especially true in battles, which is where The Iron Oath really shines. When I head into a dungeon, I get an abstracted overview. I can scout ahead, disarm traps, and explore. When combat happens, we get right to business; my four mercenaries are placed on a grid along with some enemies. I then decide my initial placement, and the strategy begins. Flanking, cover, and positioning are all important; the enemy is usually equipped with brutal damage abilities and debuffs that can cause chaos if I don’t plan around it. My powerful spells and attacks also have limited charges for the duration of the dungeon, which means I have to ration across many battles.
This constant tension of resource management, limited supplies, and continual danger means that I sometimes have to make some rough choices — choices that my mercenaries will have thoughts about. For instance, in the depths of a dark dungeon, I find an injured man. I can help him out of there, but that will give my enemies more time to set up traps and ambushes. I can give him some of my precious medical supplies so he can escape on his own. Or … I could just kill him and loot his body! That might aggravate some of my mercenaries, but others will think that’s just smart. Giving away health potions to strangers? In this economy?

Image: Curious Panda Games/Humble Games
If I make too many choices that my mercenaries don’t like (or if I don’t pay them because I just had to spend all of my gold on gear) they’ll leave the company altogether. Angry, tired mercenaries are also less useful in battle, which can cause a spiral in morale as they get injured or their friends die.
The biggest issue throughout my time with The Iron Oath is the UI. It’s a collection of little annoyances that don’t seem to matter individually, but they pile up over time. For instance, during battles, there’s no easy way to see my characters’ health at a glance as I survey the battle. Their portrait overlays will have a red shadow that represents their general HP loss, or I can hover over them with my cursor to get a full name and health bar — but neither of these are ideal when I’m also trying to suss out all the enemy information and terrain, while also worrying about the remainder of the dungeon. At other times, I accidentally closed out of upgrade screens, and it took me a while to find them again. None of these are deal breakers (especially in an early access game) but they’re bummers nonetheless.
Overall, I’m excited to see how The Iron Oath develops; Curious Panda Games has already laid out a road map throughout 2022 leading to an eventual full release that includes a new class, more points of interest, and more quests. For now, I’m having a lot of fun with the current build — my mercenaries, on the other hand, probably have some complaints with my management style.
The Iron Oath was released on April 19 on Windows PC. The game was reviewed using a download code provided by Humble Games. Vox Media has affiliate partnerships. These do not influence editorial content, though Vox Media may earn commissions for products purchased via affiliate links. You can find additional information about Polygon’s ethics policy here.

#Iron #Oath #great #turnbased #tactics #game


Synthetic: Vik News

Vik News

Viknews Vietnam specializes in sharing useful knowledge about marriage - family, beauty, motherhood experience, nutritional care during pregnancy, before and after birth, lipstick, royal jelly, home and furniture. (wooden doors, decorative chandeliers, dining tables, kitchen cabinets..)……

Trả lời

Email của bạn sẽ không được hiển thị công khai. Các trường bắt buộc được đánh dấu *

Back to top button