Reviews

The Sandra Oh ghost story Umma is one giant missed opportunity

Horror is part of Sam Raimi’s film DNA. evil dead The trilogy adds a touch of monster movies to his Spider-Man films, or releases thrillers such as: simple plan or Present With more cryptic forms of eerie horror. So it’s only natural that he should invest some of his vast studio capital into horror films. Movies like Breaking B not breathing And crawl Exceptions. disappointing taste 30 nights And look man It was the rule.

Raimi’s shaky track record as a horror producer isn’t the fault of the writer and director Iris K. Shim behind it. grandma. But when you watch this completely eerie, slow-paced horror film produced by Raimi, it’s hard to avoid nostalgia for the energy and aggressiveness of a film like Raimi’s. take me to hell, he called it “spook-a-blast” in a promotional interview. The simplest definition of this term is an amplified funhouse horror film. grandma no, except for one take me to hellA shot style in which the female protagonist is moved by the power of a ghost. Unfortunately, this ferocity has proven to be short-lived. For a thin but slow 83 minutes grandma It’s full of scenes of missed opportunities that require a spooky sense of humor or a leap from a shaky audience.

Instead, Amanda (kill eve co-star Sandra Oh) spends a lot of time mopping. Amanda emigrates to the United States to escape her overbearing mother in South Korea (the film’s title is derived from the Korean “mother”), where she works with her teenage daughter Chris (Five Stewart) to make honey on a small, secluded bee farm. . Her only regular contact is with a friendly local (Dermot Mulroney) who helps Amanda sell her honey online in exchange for her bookkeeping job. Why do you need to deal with others to maintain a humble ecommerce business? Because they live without electricity, there is no light, no cell phone, no combustion engine. (Visitors are required to turn off the engine of her car when entering her quarters.) Amanda claims that electricity makes her physically ill and that this clearly obscures her painful past.

That past doesn’t exactly come back to Amanda’s life. He basically walks her to Amanda’s house and explains that she will follow her more directly in front of her. At the beginning of the film, Amanda’s uncle appears from Korea to fetch the cremated remains of her recently deceased mother. Soon after, Amanda begins to see the ghost of her restless mother, angry, and Chris begins to resent her mother’s protection. Like 17-year-old boys locked up in a shelter, Chris secretly explores college choices until his overbearing parents find out. Like all overbearing parents in the film, Amanda sees this development as a shocking betrayal. Conflicts are so familiar and caricatured that it is difficult to take them seriously. (Wouldn’t she be more cunning if Amanda had subtly undermined her daughter, at least in the first place?)

As Chris moves away, Amanda becomes more anxious and anxious. Tell me, can she be a mother if Amanda isn’t careful? Amanda herself continues to ask questions out loud in case the ongoing conflict is ambiguous. Some horror films rely on a quiet generation of restless birds. grandma Instead, it contains at least five scenes in which one character stands in front of another, revealing past or present emotions. No mystery, no images, no subtext, and between these dark confessions, the story creates a surprising lack of momentum. It boils down to a list of things that were scary enough in other situations: ghosts, masks, childhood traumas, and the transformations of monsters you once feared.

Five Stewart holding a scary mask and looking at it in the horror movie Umma

Photo courtesy of Saeed Adyani/Sony Pictures

The topics your Sims want to explore have fueled many notable horror images, including most recently: relics, lectureAnd heredity. In comparison, grandma It certainly seems to work, and the actors seem uncomfortable, but in reality they’ve never been intimidated. Mr. Oh, who starred in horror, is especially quiet. Instead of succumbing to frustration or fear, engaging Amanda’s inner monster, or changing her acting in any way, she’s constantly horrified and conveys all her soul’s fears. By anyone who is afraid of long bus rides. Stewart does slightly better, especially when paired up with Odeya Rush as a socialized girl of her age. However, the film doesn’t have much imagination when it comes to effects in which her character is almost completely isolated. Chris is just an ordinary girl without a cell phone.

There is no feral feeling to anyone or anything. grandma, and making an effective film about losing control when the set doesn’t seem out of the way for anyone is difficult. Some memorable images also stand out, including Amanda’s mother captured through a beekeeper’s mask, and Raimi-style reverse shots jumping from the ground under the moonlight. It disappears quickly, as if shy to hint at something interesting. The most interesting thing about this movie is sheer coincidence. It’s been a week since Pixar’s awesome movie came out. redOh takes on the role of a mother who lives in fear of her mother while at the same time choking her child. All those parents whose big kids roll their eyes at the thought of anime red You are invited to show with your family. grandma instead of this. It doesn’t dissuade her from her, but it can make her submissive.

grandma Theatrical release on March 18th.


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The Sandra Oh ghost story Umma is one giant missed opportunity

Horror is part of Sam Raimi’s cinematic DNA, whether he goes all out with slapstick gorefests like the evil Dead trilogy, adding monster movie touches to his Spider-Man films, or releasing thrillers like A simple plan or Gift with a more subdued form of creeping terror. So it’s only natural that he would devote some of his big-studio capital to producing horror movies – and it’s downright baffling how good few of them have been. Breaking B movies like don’t breathe and Crawl are the exceptions. The disappointing tastes of 30 days of night and Boogeyman were the rule.
Raimi’s shaky track record as a horror producer isn’t the fault of Iris K. Shim, the writer-director behind Ouma. But looking at this decidedly unscary, poorly paced horror image produced by Raimi, it’s hard to avoid a hint of nostalgia for the energy and aggression of films like Raimi’s. drag me to hell, which he described in promotional interviews as a “spook-a-blast”. The simplest definition of this term is an amplified funhouse horror movie, which Ouma is not, apart from one drag me to hellstyle shot where the heroine is, yes, driven by a ghostly force. Unfortunately, this savagery proves to be short-lived. Throughout its thin but slow 83 minutes, Ouma crams in scenes of missed opportunities that beg for a macabre sense of humor or a shaken-up leap from the audience.

Instead, Amanda (Kill Eve co-star Sandra Oh) spends a lot of time moping around. Amanda escaped her overbearing mother in Korea (the film’s title comes from “mother” in Korean) and moved to America, where she and her teenage daughter Chris (Fivel Stewart) make honey on a small, isolated bee farm. . Their only regular point of contact is a friendly local (Dermot Mulroney) who helps sell their honey online in exchange for Amanda’s accounting work. Why do they need to barter with someone to maintain a modest e-commerce business? Because they live without electricity: no light, no cell phone, no internal combustion engine. (Visitors must turn off their car engines as soon as they reach the property.) Amanda claims the electricity makes her physically sick, a clear obscuring of her troubled past.
That past doesn’t exactly come back to Amanda’s life — he basically walks up to her door and explains that it will haunt her more directly in the future. As the film begins, Amanda’s uncle from Korea shows up to bring her the cremated remains of her recently deceased mother. Soon after, Amanda begins to see the ghostly, angry figure of her unstable mother, just as Chris begins to chafe at his mother’s protection. Like all protected 17-year-olds, Chris explores his college options in secret until his overbearing parent finds out. Like all overbearing parents in a movie, Amanda sees this development as a shocking betrayal. The conflict is so familiar and cartoonishly rendered that it’s hard to take it seriously. (Wouldn’t it be more insidious if Amanda subtly undermined her daughter, at least at first?)
As Chris walks away, Amanda becomes progressively more fearful and nervous as she attempts to tighten her grip. Say, could Amanda start turning into her mother if she’s not careful? Amanda herself asks this question repeatedly, out loud, in case the ongoing conflict is vaguely unclear. Some horror movies rely on the silent generation of currents of unease. Ouma instead contains at least five scenes where one character stands in front of another and exposes their past or current feelings. There’s no mystery, no imagery, no subtext, and between those dark confessions, the story generates a surprising lack of momentum. That amounts to a list of things that have been, in other contexts, scary enough: ghosts, masks, childhood trauma, and the monster transformation you once feared.

Photo: Saeed Adyani/Sony Pictures
The themes that Shim wants to explore have fueled many notable horror images, most recently including Relic, Courseand Hereditary. By comparing, Ouma seems to work with security, which makes the actors look uncomfortable but never really terrified. As a horror lead, Oh is particularly static. Rather than indulging in frustration or fear, engaging with Amanda’s inner monster, or altering her performance in any way, she looks continually appalled, conveying all the soulful dread. of someone who dreads a long bus ride. Stewart fare a little better, especially when paired with Odeya Rush as a more socialized girl her age. But the film doesn’t have much imagination when it comes to the effects of her character’s near-total isolation. Chris is pretty much just a well-adjusted girl with no cell phone.
There is no feeling of wildness for anyone or anything in Ouma, and it’s hard to make an effective film about losing control when the set seems reluctant to bother anyone. Even the handful of memorable images — a vision of Amanda’s mother taken through a beekeeper’s mask, or a Raimi-style upside-down shot of a figure springing from the earth in the moonlight — stand out. dissipate quickly, as if embarrassed to hint at something fun. The most interesting thing about the film is purely coincidental: it comes a week after Pixar’s wonderful film. turn red, which also features Oh playing a mother who simultaneously smothers her child and lives in fear of her own mother. All the bossy parents whose older kids roll their eyes at the thought of watching the animation turn red with their families are invited to show them Ouma Instead. It won’t scare them off, but it might bore them into submission.
Ouma hits theaters on March 18.

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#Sandra #ghost #story #Umma #giant #missed #opportunity

The Sandra Oh ghost story Umma is one giant missed opportunity

Horror is part of Sam Raimi’s cinematic DNA, whether he goes all out with slapstick gorefests like the evil Dead trilogy, adding monster movie touches to his Spider-Man films, or releasing thrillers like A simple plan or Gift with a more subdued form of creeping terror. So it’s only natural that he would devote some of his big-studio capital to producing horror movies – and it’s downright baffling how good few of them have been. Breaking B movies like don’t breathe and Crawl are the exceptions. The disappointing tastes of 30 days of night and Boogeyman were the rule.
Raimi’s shaky track record as a horror producer isn’t the fault of Iris K. Shim, the writer-director behind Ouma. But looking at this decidedly unscary, poorly paced horror image produced by Raimi, it’s hard to avoid a hint of nostalgia for the energy and aggression of films like Raimi’s. drag me to hell, which he described in promotional interviews as a “spook-a-blast”. The simplest definition of this term is an amplified funhouse horror movie, which Ouma is not, apart from one drag me to hellstyle shot where the heroine is, yes, driven by a ghostly force. Unfortunately, this savagery proves to be short-lived. Throughout its thin but slow 83 minutes, Ouma crams in scenes of missed opportunities that beg for a macabre sense of humor or a shaken-up leap from the audience.

Instead, Amanda (Kill Eve co-star Sandra Oh) spends a lot of time moping around. Amanda escaped her overbearing mother in Korea (the film’s title comes from “mother” in Korean) and moved to America, where she and her teenage daughter Chris (Fivel Stewart) make honey on a small, isolated bee farm. . Their only regular point of contact is a friendly local (Dermot Mulroney) who helps sell their honey online in exchange for Amanda’s accounting work. Why do they need to barter with someone to maintain a modest e-commerce business? Because they live without electricity: no light, no cell phone, no internal combustion engine. (Visitors must turn off their car engines as soon as they reach the property.) Amanda claims the electricity makes her physically sick, a clear obscuring of her troubled past.
That past doesn’t exactly come back to Amanda’s life — he basically walks up to her door and explains that it will haunt her more directly in the future. As the film begins, Amanda’s uncle from Korea shows up to bring her the cremated remains of her recently deceased mother. Soon after, Amanda begins to see the ghostly, angry figure of her unstable mother, just as Chris begins to chafe at his mother’s protection. Like all protected 17-year-olds, Chris explores his college options in secret until his overbearing parent finds out. Like all overbearing parents in a movie, Amanda sees this development as a shocking betrayal. The conflict is so familiar and cartoonishly rendered that it’s hard to take it seriously. (Wouldn’t it be more insidious if Amanda subtly undermined her daughter, at least at first?)
As Chris walks away, Amanda becomes progressively more fearful and nervous as she attempts to tighten her grip. Say, could Amanda start turning into her mother if she’s not careful? Amanda herself asks this question repeatedly, out loud, in case the ongoing conflict is vaguely unclear. Some horror movies rely on the silent generation of currents of unease. Ouma instead contains at least five scenes where one character stands in front of another and exposes their past or current feelings. There’s no mystery, no imagery, no subtext, and between those dark confessions, the story generates a surprising lack of momentum. That amounts to a list of things that have been, in other contexts, scary enough: ghosts, masks, childhood trauma, and the monster transformation you once feared.

Photo: Saeed Adyani/Sony Pictures
The themes that Shim wants to explore have fueled many notable horror images, most recently including Relic, Courseand Hereditary. By comparing, Ouma seems to work with security, which makes the actors look uncomfortable but never really terrified. As a horror lead, Oh is particularly static. Rather than indulging in frustration or fear, engaging with Amanda’s inner monster, or altering her performance in any way, she looks continually appalled, conveying all the soulful dread. of someone who dreads a long bus ride. Stewart fare a little better, especially when paired with Odeya Rush as a more socialized girl her age. But the film doesn’t have much imagination when it comes to the effects of her character’s near-total isolation. Chris is pretty much just a well-adjusted girl with no cell phone.
There is no feeling of wildness for anyone or anything in Ouma, and it’s hard to make an effective film about losing control when the set seems reluctant to bother anyone. Even the handful of memorable images — a vision of Amanda’s mother taken through a beekeeper’s mask, or a Raimi-style upside-down shot of a figure springing from the earth in the moonlight — stand out. dissipate quickly, as if embarrassed to hint at something fun. The most interesting thing about the film is purely coincidental: it comes a week after Pixar’s wonderful film. turn red, which also features Oh playing a mother who simultaneously smothers her child and lives in fear of her own mother. All the bossy parents whose older kids roll their eyes at the thought of watching the animation turn red with their families are invited to show them Ouma Instead. It won’t scare them off, but it might bore them into submission.
Ouma hits theaters on March 18.

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Patch NotesA weekly roundup of Polygon’s best stuff

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#Sandra #ghost #story #Umma #giant #missed #opportunity


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