Entertainment

Unhuman Review: Teen Snark Can’t Save Zombie Breakfast Club Riff

Screenwriters Marcus Dunstan and Patrick Melton are known more for their adult-leaning horror fare, including the brutal Feast, some of the Saw movies, and The Collection. More recently, the pair worked on the 2019 adaptation of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark and Unhuman feels like an extension of that. Unfortunately, some of the dialogue is clunky coming out of the mouths of the young actors and it becomes clear quickly that Dunstan and Melton are a bit out of their element when it comes to writing for Gen Z. Nonetheless, the group of actors handles the material with aplomb, but the gory happenings   around them are merely a conduit for a message hidden underneath the horror package. While it’s certainly an interesting conceit, Unhuman‘s slim runtime doesn’t last long enough to hold up the message it’s trying to sell.

What’s left after all that are the scares and, sadly, Unhuman doesn’t have much going on in that department either. Early on, the concept is interesting enough, but as the group of headstrong kids progress through this nightmarish situation, the horror of Unhuman is all but undermined by an early third act twist that changes just about everything that’s come before it. Relying too much on jump scares isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but when that’s all there is left, a horror movie is only as strong as its characters.

Fortunately, characters are where Unhuman is strongest. Despite some thinly sketched caricatures, most of the cast shines with what they are given. Tju’s Brianne begins the film as a bit of an enigma but comes into her own and the young actress proves she’s more than capable of earning the title of Scream Queen. Additionally, Scheid, who previously starred in 2018’s David Gordon Green Halloween legacy sequel, makes Steven a conflicted character to love and hate.

The dynamic of the group at the center of Unhuman certainly leads to some laugh-out-loud moments, but this leads to the movie feeling tonally uneven. It can’t decide whether it wants to be a zombie movie, a riff on The Breakfast Club, or something in between. Narrative whiplash doesn’t help and by the time the movie’s conclusion rolls around, it’s hard to imagine any other ending besides the one that audiences get. There’s nothing worse in horror than predictability and while Unhuman tries to throw some curveballs, it misses the mark more than it hits its target.

Unhuman is available on digital as of June 3. The film is 91 minutes long and is not rated.

Our Rating:

2 out of 5 (Okay)


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Unhuman Review: Teen Snark Can’t Save Zombie Breakfast Club Riff

Screenwriters Marcus Dunstan and Patrick Melton are known more for their adult-leaning horror fare, including the brutal Feast, some of the Saw movies, and The Collection. More recently, the pair worked on the 2019 adaptation of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark and Unhuman feels like an extension of that. Unfortunately, some of the dialogue is clunky coming out of the mouths of the young actors and it becomes clear quickly that Dunstan and Melton are a bit out of their element when it comes to writing for Gen Z. Nonetheless, the group of actors handles the material with aplomb, but the gory happenings   around them are merely a conduit for a message hidden underneath the horror package. While it’s certainly an interesting conceit, Unhuman‘s slim runtime doesn’t last long enough to hold up the message it’s trying to sell.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

What’s left after all that are the scares and, sadly, Unhuman doesn’t have much going on in that department either. Early on, the concept is interesting enough, but as the group of headstrong kids progress through this nightmarish situation, the horror of Unhuman is all but undermined by an early third act twist that changes just about everything that’s come before it. Relying too much on jump scares isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but when that’s all there is left, a horror movie is only as strong as its characters.

Fortunately, characters are where Unhuman is strongest. Despite some thinly sketched caricatures, most of the cast shines with what they are given. Tju’s Brianne begins the film as a bit of an enigma but comes into her own and the young actress proves she’s more than capable of earning the title of Scream Queen. Additionally, Scheid, who previously starred in 2018’s David Gordon Green Halloween legacy sequel, makes Steven a conflicted character to love and hate.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

The dynamic of the group at the center of Unhuman certainly leads to some laugh-out-loud moments, but this leads to the movie feeling tonally uneven. It can’t decide whether it wants to be a zombie movie, a riff on The Breakfast Club, or something in between. Narrative whiplash doesn’t help and by the time the movie’s conclusion rolls around, it’s hard to imagine any other ending besides the one that audiences get. There’s nothing worse in horror than predictability and while Unhuman tries to throw some curveballs, it misses the mark more than it hits its target.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

Unhuman is available on digital as of June 3. The film is 91 minutes long and is not rated.

Our Rating:
2 out of 5 (Okay)

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-0’); });

#Unhuman #Review #Teen #Snark #Save #Zombie #Breakfast #Club #Riff

Unhuman Review: Teen Snark Can’t Save Zombie Breakfast Club Riff

Screenwriters Marcus Dunstan and Patrick Melton are known more for their adult-leaning horror fare, including the brutal Feast, some of the Saw movies, and The Collection. More recently, the pair worked on the 2019 adaptation of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark and Unhuman feels like an extension of that. Unfortunately, some of the dialogue is clunky coming out of the mouths of the young actors and it becomes clear quickly that Dunstan and Melton are a bit out of their element when it comes to writing for Gen Z. Nonetheless, the group of actors handles the material with aplomb, but the gory happenings   around them are merely a conduit for a message hidden underneath the horror package. While it’s certainly an interesting conceit, Unhuman‘s slim runtime doesn’t last long enough to hold up the message it’s trying to sell.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

What’s left after all that are the scares and, sadly, Unhuman doesn’t have much going on in that department either. Early on, the concept is interesting enough, but as the group of headstrong kids progress through this nightmarish situation, the horror of Unhuman is all but undermined by an early third act twist that changes just about everything that’s come before it. Relying too much on jump scares isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but when that’s all there is left, a horror movie is only as strong as its characters.

Fortunately, characters are where Unhuman is strongest. Despite some thinly sketched caricatures, most of the cast shines with what they are given. Tju’s Brianne begins the film as a bit of an enigma but comes into her own and the young actress proves she’s more than capable of earning the title of Scream Queen. Additionally, Scheid, who previously starred in 2018’s David Gordon Green Halloween legacy sequel, makes Steven a conflicted character to love and hate.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

The dynamic of the group at the center of Unhuman certainly leads to some laugh-out-loud moments, but this leads to the movie feeling tonally uneven. It can’t decide whether it wants to be a zombie movie, a riff on The Breakfast Club, or something in between. Narrative whiplash doesn’t help and by the time the movie’s conclusion rolls around, it’s hard to imagine any other ending besides the one that audiences get. There’s nothing worse in horror than predictability and while Unhuman tries to throw some curveballs, it misses the mark more than it hits its target.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

Unhuman is available on digital as of June 3. The film is 91 minutes long and is not rated.

Our Rating:
2 out of 5 (Okay)

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-0’); });

#Unhuman #Review #Teen #Snark #Save #Zombie #Breakfast #Club #Riff


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