Tech

What’s the Shift to Electric Vehicles All About?

The enthusiasm for introducing EVs to every driveway is hot.

While the discussion of EV regulation may seem abrupt, it’s actually been boiling for decades.

The transition to electric vehicles is being driven by a number of interconnected factors, including concerns about fossil fuels, government regulations and incentives, technological advances, and long-term plans by automakers. Each of these factors impacts in different ways, such as government regulations that drive more consumer interest due to better battery technology and encourage automakers to invest more in electric vehicles.

Some of the world’s largest automakers have already switched to all-electric vehicles, and some states have now set internal combustion engine expiration dates, after which only electric vehicles can be purchased. These individual forces can push and pull in different directions, but the number of electric vehicles on the road continues to grow every year.

What Happens to Electric Vehicles?

The current EV transition is only the beginning, but EVs are not new innovations. Electric cars have been around as long as gasoline cars, and some of the first cars were battery-powered. At the turn of the century, there were actually more electric cars than gasoline cars on the road.

At the beginning of the 20th century, the convenience and affordability of gasoline vehicles alienated electric vehicles. Battery technology has not been able to keep up with the mileage, performance and fuel efficiency of gasoline vehicles. Interest in electric vehicles has increased due to oil shortages and rising gasoline prices, but the technology and infrastructure are still lacking.

Electric Vehicles: A Brief History Lesson

Advances in battery technology have opened the door

Sean Gallup/Getty

The science of electrochemical energy storage has come a long way since the first electric vehicles powered by lead-acid batteries. Current lithium-ion battery technology is more efficient than lead acid, offers a much higher energy density, charges faster, and is lighter.

At the end of the 20th century, some major automakers introduced test benches for electric vehicles. The consensus in the industry was that it would take decades for battery technology to finally be able to compete with gas. Then, Tesla showed that battery technology was ready for long-term use and that the automotive industry’s timeline was off to a quick start.

Tesla is one of the biggest drivers of battery technology in the United States, but it is also important to highlight the impact of global competition in this space. EV sales still make up a small fraction of new car sales in the US, but the story is different in other parts of the world.

Emerging markets such as China have had a significant impact on the EV market, accounting for 44% of global EVs in China alone. China is also a world leader in the battery supply chain, sparking competition from the US and EU in this space.

Intensifying competition improves supply chains, manufacturing techniques and technologies, providing more attractive prices and services to the average driver.

Emission regulations and regulatory requirements make the clock ticking.

Advances in battery technology have allowed electric vehicles to compete with gasoline-powered vehicles, but they still tend to be more expensive and have less mileage. However, electric vehicles have one major advantage: they do not cause exhaust pipe emissions. Even taking into account the environmental impacts of battery manufacturing, transportation and charging, electric vehicles are still number one.

How “green” are electric vehicles really?

As part of a larger effort to reduce carbon emissions, governments around the world have targeted the transport sector. In the United States, emissions from transportation account for 29% of total greenhouse gas emissions. This has made the transportation sector a prime target for emission regulations, and passenger cars have been subject to increasingly stringent Environmental Protection Agency emission standards since the 1970s.

In other parts of the world, governments are already using mandates and tax refunds to encourage widespread adoption of electric vehicles. For example, electric vehicles accounted for more than 40% of new cars sold in Norway in 2020.

Some states in the United States have set sales deadlines for new gasoline vehicles that go beyond simply lowering emissions. For example, starting in 2035, you will no longer be able to buy new gasoline vehicles in California.

Other states have attempted to set more aggressive deadlines, but others have been hesitant due to concerns about a lack of charging infrastructure and other factors.

Building a nationwide charging infrastructure

Electric car charging station in a public charging station with palm trees in the background.

Chuin/Getty

In the United States, the nationwide charging infrastructure has not kept pace with advances in battery technology. You can get a Tesla with an EPA rating of over 402 miles, and Toyota has prototypes that can go 300 miles on a 10-minute charge, but not everyone has easy access to a fast-charging electric vehicle station.

For many drivers and in many situations, public charging stations are not required. Many drivers can easily charge their vehicles at home, and modern electric vehicles provide more than enough range for most commutes, errands, and other daily driving tasks.

But for those who can’t charge at home, the nationwide charging infrastructure is now a problem.

It also needs extensive improvements to facilitate interstate commerce and travel. A 300 or 400 mile range is not enough without easy access to fast charging facilities along the way.

The Department of Energy has already made significant progress in building a nationwide charging infrastructure, investing more than $115 million between 2009 and 2013.

More recently, the Biden administration endorsed plans to install 500,000 chargers at 28,000 charging stations over the next several years. This is more than five times the capacity of the current national charging infrastructure.

Automakers don’t want to be left behind.

The automotive industry is huge and moves much slower than the vehicles it produces. Automakers are often slow to adopt new technologies, and big changes don’t happen overnight. With this in mind, large automakers risk falling behind if the changes actually happen if they don’t bet early.

When Tesla demonstrated that it could mass-produce a viable electric vehicle using its current technology, most major automakers started planning in earnest. Every major automaker today offers at least a few EV options, with more coming online every year.

Electric vehicles now account for a minority of new car sales, but sales are increasing every year due to improved reach and performance, government incentives and more options.

In addition to simply offering more options, some automakers are committed to the EV transition. GM has pledged to produce only electric vehicles by 2035. Others made huge investments, but never made it to GM.

But Ford has promised more than $29 billion for EV propulsion, Volkswagen has promised more than $35 billion, and has promised to offer 70 new all-electric models by 2028. BMW-owned Rolls-Royce, along with other premium brands such as Volkswagen Bentley, Jaguar Land Rover and Mercedes-Benz Daimler, has announced that it will produce only electric vehicles by 2030.

Changing trends in consumer acceptance and interest

Woman in driver's seat with car key of her new electric car

aquaArts Studio/Getty

There is a clear back-and-forth between government regulations, automaker initiatives, and international competition that conspire to accelerate the EV transition. But the most important factor is consumer acceptance and interest. Although this has also increased in recent years, sales of new gasoline engines still far exceed sales of new electric vehicles.

Some of the biggest stumbling blocks for many drivers in the past have been charging, range and pricing issues. Model diversity was also an issue, but model diversity is rapidly declining as automakers continue to offer an ever-expanding range, with older popular products like the Ford F-150 also being offered in all-electric versions.

This is the range required for electric vehicles.

As the nation’s charging infrastructure expands and advances such as DC fast charging reduce the time it takes to “charge” on the road, charging problems will decrease.

Pricing issues are now being alleviated to some extent through tax refunds and incentives in some regions, but economies of scale mean that as more EVs are sold, improvements in supply chains and other factors could eventually bring prices closer to those of gasoline vehicles. do. .

Common misconceptions about electric cars, such as not performing as well as gasoline cars, have hindered sales in the past as well. As more EVs hit the road and this misconception turns out to be erroneous, it could further increase consumer acceptance. Advanced features such as autonomous driving will also attract consumers’ attention when released.

The transition to electric vehicles has taken a long time. Despite hundreds of years of detours and countless challenges, these changes are being driven by a number of powerful forces.

Government regulations, international pressures and competition, long-term industry plans and environmental concerns are all having an impact, and the chances that the next car will be electric are getting better every year.

Are you trying to figure out how electric cars could enter your life? Read our absolute beginner’s guide to electric vehicles to learn more.


More information

What’s the Shift to Electric Vehicles All About?

The heat is on to get EVs into every driveway

The conversation about mandates for electric vehicles might feel sudden but, in reality, it’s been simmering for decades.

The shift to electric vehicles is driven by a number of interconnected forces, including concerns about fossil fuels, government regulations and incentives, technological advances, and long-term plans from auto manufacturers. Each of these forces acts on others in a variety of ways, like better battery technology resulting in more consumer interest, and government regulations leading automakers to invest more in EVs.

Some of the biggest automakers in the world have already gone all-in on electric, and some states have now put an expiration date on the internal combustion engine, beyond which you’ll only be able to buy EVs. While these individual forces can push and pull in different directions, the number of EVs on the road continues to increase every year.

What Happened to Electric Vehicles?

While the current shift to electric vehicles is just getting started, electric vehicles aren’t a recent innovation. Electric vehicles have been around just as long as gas-powered vehicles, and some of the very first automobiles were battery-powered. At the turn of the 20th century, there were actually more electric vehicles on the road than gas-powered vehicles.

In the early part of the 20th century, the convenience and affordability of gas-powered vehicles relegated EVs to the sidelines. Battery technology just couldn’t keep up with the range, performance, and ease of refueling offered by gas powered vehicles. Interest in electric vehicles spiked during times of oil shortages and soaring gas prices, but the technology and infrastructure still just wasn’t there.

Electric Vehicles: A Short History Lesson
Advances in Battery Technology Opened a Door
Sean Gallup/Getty

The science of electrochemical energy storage has come a long way since the first electric vehicles puttered around powered by lead acid batteries. Current lithium-ion battery technology is more efficient, offers a significantly higher energy density, charges faster, and weighs less than lead acid.

Toward the end of the 20th century, a number of major automakers launched electric vehicle testbeds. The industry consensus was that battery technology was a few decades away from finally being competitive with gas. Then Tesla showed that battery technology was already viable for sustained use, and auto industry timetables shifted into high gear.

Tesla has been one of the biggest forces in driving battery technology forward in the US, but it’s also important to stress the impact of global competition in that area. While EV sales still represent a small minority of new vehicle sales in the US, the story is different in other parts of the world.

Emerging markets like China have exerted massive force on the field of electric vehicles, with China alone accounting for 44 percent of all the EVs in the world. China also leads the world in terms of its battery supply chain, spurring further competition in that area from the US and the EU.

Increased competition leads to improved supply chains, manufacturing techniques, and technologies, resulting in prices and performances that are more attractive to the average driver.
Emissions Regulations and Government Mandates Create a Ticking Clock

While improvements in battery technology have made it possible for electric vehicles to compete with gas vehicles, they still tend to be more expensive and offer less range. However, electric vehicles do have one crucial advantage in that they don’t create any tailpipe emissions. Even when you take into account the environmental impact of manufacturing, shipping, and charging the batteries, electric vehicles still come out on top.

How ‘Green’ are Electric Vehicles, Really?

As one part of a larger effort to reduce carbon emissions, governments around the world have looked to the transportation sector. In the United States, emissions from transportation account for 29 percent of the total greenhouse gas emissions. That makes the transportation sector a prime target for emissions regulations, and passenger vehicles have been subject to ever-tightening emissions standards by the Environmental Protection Agency since the 1970s.

Elsewhere in the world, governments have already used mandates and tax rebates to drive the widespread adoption of electric vehicles. For example, electric vehicles accounted for more than 40 percent of the new vehicles sold in Norway in 2020.

In the US, a number of individual states have gone beyond simply mandating lower emissions and actually put an expiration date on the sale of new gas-powered vehicles. For example, you won’t be able to buy any new gas-powered vehicles in California starting in 2035.

Other states have attempted to set even more aggressive timelines, while others have hesitated due to concerns over a lack of charging infrastructure and other factors.

Building Out a Nationwide Charging Infrastructure
Chuyn/Getty

In the United States, the nationwide charging infrastructure hasn’t kept up with advancements in battery technology. While you can get a Tesla with an EPA-rated range of over 402 miles, and Toyota has a prototype that offers a 300 mile range with a 10 minute charge time, not everyone has easy access to EV fast charging stations.

For many drivers, and many situations, public charging stations aren’t necessary. Many drivers can simply charge their vehicles at home, and modern EVs provide more than enough range for most commutes, errands, and other daily driving tasks.

For those who can’t charge at home, however, the current state of the nationwide charging infrastructure poses a problem.

Extensive improvements will also be necessary to facilitate interstate commerce and travel, where a 300 or 400 mile range just isn’t enough without easy access to fast charging facilities along the way.

Extensive progress has already been made on building out the nationwide charging infrastructure, with the Department of Energy pumping in over $115 million between 2009 and 2013.

More recently, the Biden administration has backed a plan to install 500,000 chargers at 28,000 charging stations in the coming years. That’s more than five times the current capacity of the nationwide charging infrastructure.

Automakers Don’t Want to Get Left Behind

The automotive industry is massive, and it moves much slower than the vehicles it produces. Automakers are often slow to adopt new technologies, and big changes don’t often happen overnight. With that in mind, the major automobile manufacturers have to make their bets early, or risk getting left behind when change actually does come.

When Tesla proved that it was possible to mass produce a viable electric vehicle with the current technology, most of the major automakers kicked their plans into high gear. Today, every major automaker offers at least a few EV options, with many more coming online each year.

While EVs only represent a small minority of new vehicle sales today, sales increase every year, bolstered by improvements in range and performance, government incentives, and more options to choose from.

Beyond simply offering more options, some automakers have fully committed to the shift to electric vehicles. General Motors has pledged that it will only manufacture electric vehicles starting in 2035. Others have made huge investments, but haven’t gone quite as far as GM.

However, Ford has committed $29 billion to its electric push, and Volkswagen has earmarked more than $35 billion along with a pledge to offer 70 new fully electric models by 2028. Rolls Royce, owned by BMW, announced it will produce only electric cars by 2030, joining other premium brands like Volkswagen’s Bentley, Jaguar’s Land Rover, and Mercedes Benz Daimler.

The Changing Tide of Consumer Acceptance and Interest
aquaArts studio/Getty

There’s a definite push and pull between government regulations, automaker plans, and international competition that have all conspired to drive forward the shift to electric. However, the most important component is consumer acceptance and interest. That has increased in recent years as well, although the sales of new gas cars still far outstrips the sales of new electric vehicles.

Some of the biggest stumbling blocks for a lot of drivers have historically been issues with charging, range, and price. Model variety has also been an issue, although that’s quickly falling by the wayside as automakers offer an increasingly large selection, with even old favorites like the Ford F-150 being offered in an all-electric version.

How Much Range You Need in Your EV

Charging will be less and less of an issue as the nationwide charging infrastructure is built out, and advancements like DC fast charging reduce the amount of time it takes to “fuel up” on the road.

Price issues are currently mitigated by tax rebates and incentives to some degree in some areas, but economies of scale mean that as more electric vehicles are sold, improvements in the supply chain and other factors should eventually bring prices down closer to those of gas-powered vehicles.

Common misconceptions about electric vehicles, like that they don’t perform as well as gas-powered vehicles, have also hindered sales in the past. As more electric vehicles hit the road, and those misconceptions are shown to be wrong, that’s likely to swing consumer acceptance even further. Advanced features like self-driving are also likely to pique consumer interest as they become available.

The shift to electric vehicles has been a long time coming. Despite a century-long detour, and countless challenges, this shift is being driven by a number of powerful forces.

Governmental regulations, international pressure and competition, long-term industry plans, and environmental concerns all play a role, and the chances that your next car might be electric get better every year.

Trying to figure out electric vehicles and how they might fit into your life? Read The Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Electric Vehicles to learn more.

#Whats #Shift #Electric #Vehicles

What’s the Shift to Electric Vehicles All About?

The heat is on to get EVs into every driveway

The conversation about mandates for electric vehicles might feel sudden but, in reality, it’s been simmering for decades.

The shift to electric vehicles is driven by a number of interconnected forces, including concerns about fossil fuels, government regulations and incentives, technological advances, and long-term plans from auto manufacturers. Each of these forces acts on others in a variety of ways, like better battery technology resulting in more consumer interest, and government regulations leading automakers to invest more in EVs.

Some of the biggest automakers in the world have already gone all-in on electric, and some states have now put an expiration date on the internal combustion engine, beyond which you’ll only be able to buy EVs. While these individual forces can push and pull in different directions, the number of EVs on the road continues to increase every year.

What Happened to Electric Vehicles?

While the current shift to electric vehicles is just getting started, electric vehicles aren’t a recent innovation. Electric vehicles have been around just as long as gas-powered vehicles, and some of the very first automobiles were battery-powered. At the turn of the 20th century, there were actually more electric vehicles on the road than gas-powered vehicles.

In the early part of the 20th century, the convenience and affordability of gas-powered vehicles relegated EVs to the sidelines. Battery technology just couldn’t keep up with the range, performance, and ease of refueling offered by gas powered vehicles. Interest in electric vehicles spiked during times of oil shortages and soaring gas prices, but the technology and infrastructure still just wasn’t there.

Electric Vehicles: A Short History Lesson
Advances in Battery Technology Opened a Door
Sean Gallup/Getty

The science of electrochemical energy storage has come a long way since the first electric vehicles puttered around powered by lead acid batteries. Current lithium-ion battery technology is more efficient, offers a significantly higher energy density, charges faster, and weighs less than lead acid.

Toward the end of the 20th century, a number of major automakers launched electric vehicle testbeds. The industry consensus was that battery technology was a few decades away from finally being competitive with gas. Then Tesla showed that battery technology was already viable for sustained use, and auto industry timetables shifted into high gear.

Tesla has been one of the biggest forces in driving battery technology forward in the US, but it’s also important to stress the impact of global competition in that area. While EV sales still represent a small minority of new vehicle sales in the US, the story is different in other parts of the world.

Emerging markets like China have exerted massive force on the field of electric vehicles, with China alone accounting for 44 percent of all the EVs in the world. China also leads the world in terms of its battery supply chain, spurring further competition in that area from the US and the EU.

Increased competition leads to improved supply chains, manufacturing techniques, and technologies, resulting in prices and performances that are more attractive to the average driver.
Emissions Regulations and Government Mandates Create a Ticking Clock

While improvements in battery technology have made it possible for electric vehicles to compete with gas vehicles, they still tend to be more expensive and offer less range. However, electric vehicles do have one crucial advantage in that they don’t create any tailpipe emissions. Even when you take into account the environmental impact of manufacturing, shipping, and charging the batteries, electric vehicles still come out on top.

How ‘Green’ are Electric Vehicles, Really?

As one part of a larger effort to reduce carbon emissions, governments around the world have looked to the transportation sector. In the United States, emissions from transportation account for 29 percent of the total greenhouse gas emissions. That makes the transportation sector a prime target for emissions regulations, and passenger vehicles have been subject to ever-tightening emissions standards by the Environmental Protection Agency since the 1970s.

Elsewhere in the world, governments have already used mandates and tax rebates to drive the widespread adoption of electric vehicles. For example, electric vehicles accounted for more than 40 percent of the new vehicles sold in Norway in 2020.

In the US, a number of individual states have gone beyond simply mandating lower emissions and actually put an expiration date on the sale of new gas-powered vehicles. For example, you won’t be able to buy any new gas-powered vehicles in California starting in 2035.

Other states have attempted to set even more aggressive timelines, while others have hesitated due to concerns over a lack of charging infrastructure and other factors.

Building Out a Nationwide Charging Infrastructure
Chuyn/Getty

In the United States, the nationwide charging infrastructure hasn’t kept up with advancements in battery technology. While you can get a Tesla with an EPA-rated range of over 402 miles, and Toyota has a prototype that offers a 300 mile range with a 10 minute charge time, not everyone has easy access to EV fast charging stations.

For many drivers, and many situations, public charging stations aren’t necessary. Many drivers can simply charge their vehicles at home, and modern EVs provide more than enough range for most commutes, errands, and other daily driving tasks.

For those who can’t charge at home, however, the current state of the nationwide charging infrastructure poses a problem.

Extensive improvements will also be necessary to facilitate interstate commerce and travel, where a 300 or 400 mile range just isn’t enough without easy access to fast charging facilities along the way.

Extensive progress has already been made on building out the nationwide charging infrastructure, with the Department of Energy pumping in over $115 million between 2009 and 2013.

More recently, the Biden administration has backed a plan to install 500,000 chargers at 28,000 charging stations in the coming years. That’s more than five times the current capacity of the nationwide charging infrastructure.

Automakers Don’t Want to Get Left Behind

The automotive industry is massive, and it moves much slower than the vehicles it produces. Automakers are often slow to adopt new technologies, and big changes don’t often happen overnight. With that in mind, the major automobile manufacturers have to make their bets early, or risk getting left behind when change actually does come.

When Tesla proved that it was possible to mass produce a viable electric vehicle with the current technology, most of the major automakers kicked their plans into high gear. Today, every major automaker offers at least a few EV options, with many more coming online each year.

While EVs only represent a small minority of new vehicle sales today, sales increase every year, bolstered by improvements in range and performance, government incentives, and more options to choose from.

Beyond simply offering more options, some automakers have fully committed to the shift to electric vehicles. General Motors has pledged that it will only manufacture electric vehicles starting in 2035. Others have made huge investments, but haven’t gone quite as far as GM.

However, Ford has committed $29 billion to its electric push, and Volkswagen has earmarked more than $35 billion along with a pledge to offer 70 new fully electric models by 2028. Rolls Royce, owned by BMW, announced it will produce only electric cars by 2030, joining other premium brands like Volkswagen’s Bentley, Jaguar’s Land Rover, and Mercedes Benz Daimler.

The Changing Tide of Consumer Acceptance and Interest
aquaArts studio/Getty

There’s a definite push and pull between government regulations, automaker plans, and international competition that have all conspired to drive forward the shift to electric. However, the most important component is consumer acceptance and interest. That has increased in recent years as well, although the sales of new gas cars still far outstrips the sales of new electric vehicles.

Some of the biggest stumbling blocks for a lot of drivers have historically been issues with charging, range, and price. Model variety has also been an issue, although that’s quickly falling by the wayside as automakers offer an increasingly large selection, with even old favorites like the Ford F-150 being offered in an all-electric version.

How Much Range You Need in Your EV

Charging will be less and less of an issue as the nationwide charging infrastructure is built out, and advancements like DC fast charging reduce the amount of time it takes to “fuel up” on the road.

Price issues are currently mitigated by tax rebates and incentives to some degree in some areas, but economies of scale mean that as more electric vehicles are sold, improvements in the supply chain and other factors should eventually bring prices down closer to those of gas-powered vehicles.

Common misconceptions about electric vehicles, like that they don’t perform as well as gas-powered vehicles, have also hindered sales in the past. As more electric vehicles hit the road, and those misconceptions are shown to be wrong, that’s likely to swing consumer acceptance even further. Advanced features like self-driving are also likely to pique consumer interest as they become available.

The shift to electric vehicles has been a long time coming. Despite a century-long detour, and countless challenges, this shift is being driven by a number of powerful forces.

Governmental regulations, international pressure and competition, long-term industry plans, and environmental concerns all play a role, and the chances that your next car might be electric get better every year.

Trying to figure out electric vehicles and how they might fit into your life? Read The Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Electric Vehicles to learn more.

#Whats #Shift #Electric #Vehicles


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