News

Why the Next iPhone Doesn’t Need a New Chip

already too fast

  • Apple could use last year’s A15 chip in this year’s iPhone.
  • The iPhone is already fast enough for everything.
  • This new strategy could provide several benefits to customers.

Person holding four multicolored iPhone 11 Pros

Daniel Romero / Unsplash

For the first time ever, Apple will feature a newer, faster chip in its next iPhone Pro model, but the regular non-Pro models will be dwarfed by this year’s chip. And it doesn’t matter.

superstar analyst says Ming Chi Kuo. This fall, the new iPhone 14 will retain the current A15 chip, while iPhone Pro models are said to use the next-generation A16 chip. This could be a deliberate strategy to further differentiate the two lines, or it could be due to supply difficulties affecting the world. After all, the iPhone and iPad have been too fast for a while, so for most of us it doesn’t make much of a difference.

“Honestly, I don’t think it’s a standard iPhone 14. [needs to] I have an A16 chip. [And] Retaining last year’s chipsets does not compromise the performance and features of some of the world’s most popular and desired phone models,” Victoria Mendoza, Lifewire’s technical explainer, said via email.

why apples?

The world-famous chip shortage doesn’t really affect custom production lines like Apple’s A-series and M-series. The shortage is mostly in smaller off-the-shelf chips that have been around for years with custom processors.

So there’s not necessarily a shortage of A-series chips. So, why does Apple stop putting the latest chips in every iPhone?

See how Apple is doing Tim Cook’s business. Older models like to stay on for years after being replaced in the lineup. For example, you can buy a 2019 iPhone 11 today. Gadgets become cheaper to produce over time, and these savings can be passed on to the buyer or stored or shared by Apple.

Also, it’s easier to make the same product all the time than it is to prepare a new one every year. By delaying the base iPhone by a year over the Pro model, Apple can always use the one-year-old design in its (perhaps better-selling) mass-market model. That way you can bring more cash to the company and make it much easier to handle the huge demand as new models are released each fall.

And who will notice when Apple combines the introduction of these changes with a sleek new exterior design?

old model

iPhone chips are fast. absurdly fast. Reinforcing its current lineup, the A15 is already a generation older than the A14, the chip on which Apple’s Mac and M1-series iPads are based. The M1 has a lot of extra features, but the point is, the A15 isn’t stupid.

In fact, it can be said that the current chips for the iPhone and iPad are already too fast. The M1 iPad (now the iPad Pro and Air) struggles to harness all its power. Their simplified operating system can’t push the limits as more flexible Macs can. I have a 2018 iPad Pro and it doesn’t need replacement. This iPad runs on the A12X Bionic, the third generation of the A15.

Forget about being one step ahead of the competition. Apple is already way ahead. We can afford to leave the regular iPhone a generation behind, and in return we get some advantages.

Person holding iPhone 5

Giorgio Trovato / Unsplash

One advantage mentioned above is that it may be easier to meet demand as new phones come out. Another reason is that Apple can make their chip designs more creative.

A big challenge when working at iPhone scale is getting enough parts. Let’s say you want a nice new camera for your next phone. Your supplier must be able to manufacture tens of millions of products. It excludes many advanced technologies. Apple is already building a newer camera in its iPhone Pro models and will add it to more popular iPhones next year. Perhaps the same goes for the chip design.

Finally, knowing that you still have a “newer” chip might make it a little easier to keep your old phone for another year.

“I will [certainly make me] I feel good about my late iPhone 13 Mini purchase,” said Apple nerd Neoelectronaut on the MacRumors forum.

The consequence of these changes is that tech journalists may grumble when this happens, but later nobody will notice. After the switch, the iPhone is still on an annual chip update cycle, which is a year behind the Pro model. And that’s a good thing.


More information

Why the Next iPhone Doesn’t Need a New Chip

It’s already too fast

Apple may use last year’s A15 chip in this year’s iPhone.
The iPhone is already fast enough for anything.
There may be several advantages for customers with this new strategy.
Daniel Romero / Unsplash

For the first time ever, Apple will put a newer, faster chip in its next iPhone Pro model but leave the regular non-pro model languishing with this year’s chip. And it doesn’t matter.

Superstar analyst Ming-Chi Kuo says that this fall’s new iPhone 14 will keep the current A15 chip, while the iPhone Pro models will use the next-gen A16 chip. This could be a deliberate strategy to further differentiate the two lines, or it could be down to the supply difficulties affecting the world. Either way, it doesn’t really make a difference for most of us because iPhones—and iPads—have been too fast for a while now. 

“Honestly, I don’t think the standard iPhone 14 [needs to] have an A16 chip. [And] retaining the previous year’s chipset does not diminish the power and performance of the world’s most popular and highly coveted phone models,” tech explainer Victoria Mendoza told Lifewire via email.

Why, Apple?

The famous world chip shortage doesn’t really affect custom production lines like Apple’s A-series and M-series that much. The shortage is primarily with smaller commodity chips, years-old designs used alongside custom processors.

So there’s not necessarily a shortage of A-series chips. Why, then, would Apple stop putting the latest chips in all its iPhones? 

Take a look at the way Tim Cook’s Apple does business. It likes to keep old models around for years after they’re replaced in the lineup. You can still buy a 2019 iPhone 11 today, for example. Gadgets get cheaper to produce over time, and those savings can be passed on to the buyer, kept by Apple, or split. 

It’s also easier to keep making the same product rather than gearing up for a new one every year. By setting the base iPhone a year behind the Pro model, Apple gets to always use a year-old design in its (presumably better-selling) mass-market model. That could make the company more money, and it may also make it a lot easier to deal with the massive demand when the newer models launch each fall. 

And, if Apple combines the introduction of this change with a fancy new exterior design, then who will even notice?

Old Model

The iPhone chips are fast. Absurdly fast. The A15 that powers the current lineup is already one generation beyond the A14, the chip that Apple’s M1-series Mac and iPad are based on. The M1 has a lot of extras, but the takeaway is the A15 is no slouch. 

In fact, it could be said that the current chips are already too fast for the iPhone and even the iPad. The M1 iPads (currently the iPad Pro and Air) have trouble using all that power. Their simplified operating systems cannot push the boundaries in the way a more flexible Mac can. I have a 2018 iPad Pro, and it’s not even close to needing a replacement. That iPad runs on the A12X Bionic, three generations behind the A15. 

Forget about staying ahead of the competition. Apple is already too far ahead of itself. It can afford to let the regular iPhone slip back a generation, and in return, we’ll get several benefits.

Giorgio Trovato / Unsplash

One benefit, as mentioned above, is that it may be easier to satisfy demand when new phones launch. Another is that it will be possible for Apple to get more creative with its chip designs. 

One huge problem when you work at iPhone scale is getting enough parts. Say you decide you want a fancy new camera on your next phone. Your supplier needs to be able to make them in the tens of millions. That rules out a lot of cutting-edge tech. Apple already puts the latest cameras in the iPhone Pro models and adds them to the more popular iPhone the following year. Perhaps the same holds for chip design.

And finally, it might make it a little easier to hold onto your old phone for another year if you know it still has the “latest” chip inside. 

“This would [certainly make me] feel better about a late iPhone 13 Mini purchase,” said Apple nerd Neoelectronaut on the MacRumors forums. 

The result of this change is that tech journalists may grumble when it happens, but after that, nobody will notice. After the transition, the iPhone will still be on a yearly chip-update cycle, just a year behind the Pro model. And that’s just fine.

#iPhone #Doesnt #Chip

Why the Next iPhone Doesn’t Need a New Chip

It’s already too fast

Apple may use last year’s A15 chip in this year’s iPhone.
The iPhone is already fast enough for anything.
There may be several advantages for customers with this new strategy.
Daniel Romero / Unsplash

For the first time ever, Apple will put a newer, faster chip in its next iPhone Pro model but leave the regular non-pro model languishing with this year’s chip. And it doesn’t matter.

Superstar analyst Ming-Chi Kuo says that this fall’s new iPhone 14 will keep the current A15 chip, while the iPhone Pro models will use the next-gen A16 chip. This could be a deliberate strategy to further differentiate the two lines, or it could be down to the supply difficulties affecting the world. Either way, it doesn’t really make a difference for most of us because iPhones—and iPads—have been too fast for a while now. 

“Honestly, I don’t think the standard iPhone 14 [needs to] have an A16 chip. [And] retaining the previous year’s chipset does not diminish the power and performance of the world’s most popular and highly coveted phone models,” tech explainer Victoria Mendoza told Lifewire via email.

Why, Apple?

The famous world chip shortage doesn’t really affect custom production lines like Apple’s A-series and M-series that much. The shortage is primarily with smaller commodity chips, years-old designs used alongside custom processors.

So there’s not necessarily a shortage of A-series chips. Why, then, would Apple stop putting the latest chips in all its iPhones? 

Take a look at the way Tim Cook’s Apple does business. It likes to keep old models around for years after they’re replaced in the lineup. You can still buy a 2019 iPhone 11 today, for example. Gadgets get cheaper to produce over time, and those savings can be passed on to the buyer, kept by Apple, or split. 

It’s also easier to keep making the same product rather than gearing up for a new one every year. By setting the base iPhone a year behind the Pro model, Apple gets to always use a year-old design in its (presumably better-selling) mass-market model. That could make the company more money, and it may also make it a lot easier to deal with the massive demand when the newer models launch each fall. 

And, if Apple combines the introduction of this change with a fancy new exterior design, then who will even notice?

Old Model

The iPhone chips are fast. Absurdly fast. The A15 that powers the current lineup is already one generation beyond the A14, the chip that Apple’s M1-series Mac and iPad are based on. The M1 has a lot of extras, but the takeaway is the A15 is no slouch. 

In fact, it could be said that the current chips are already too fast for the iPhone and even the iPad. The M1 iPads (currently the iPad Pro and Air) have trouble using all that power. Their simplified operating systems cannot push the boundaries in the way a more flexible Mac can. I have a 2018 iPad Pro, and it’s not even close to needing a replacement. That iPad runs on the A12X Bionic, three generations behind the A15. 

Forget about staying ahead of the competition. Apple is already too far ahead of itself. It can afford to let the regular iPhone slip back a generation, and in return, we’ll get several benefits.

Giorgio Trovato / Unsplash

One benefit, as mentioned above, is that it may be easier to satisfy demand when new phones launch. Another is that it will be possible for Apple to get more creative with its chip designs. 

One huge problem when you work at iPhone scale is getting enough parts. Say you decide you want a fancy new camera on your next phone. Your supplier needs to be able to make them in the tens of millions. That rules out a lot of cutting-edge tech. Apple already puts the latest cameras in the iPhone Pro models and adds them to the more popular iPhone the following year. Perhaps the same holds for chip design.

And finally, it might make it a little easier to hold onto your old phone for another year if you know it still has the “latest” chip inside. 

“This would [certainly make me] feel better about a late iPhone 13 Mini purchase,” said Apple nerd Neoelectronaut on the MacRumors forums. 

The result of this change is that tech journalists may grumble when it happens, but after that, nobody will notice. After the transition, the iPhone will still be on a yearly chip-update cycle, just a year behind the Pro model. And that’s just fine.

#iPhone #Doesnt #Chip


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