News

Your Smartphone May Be Revealing Details of Your Life

It’s hard to hide on the internet

central thesis

  • Researchers say it’s difficult to protect your privacy online because your phone constantly reveals data about you.
  • By scrutinizing the metadata, hackers can find phone calls, SMS texts, and photos related to you.
  • Apps must not be granted access to social media profiles.

Oscar Wong/Getty Images

Your smartphone can reveal information about you.

A new study shows that phone manufacturers and developers aren’t doing enough to protect users’ anonymity. Researchers have now discovered that people can be identified by a few details about how they communicate with apps. The news comes amid growing concerns about declining levels of online privacy.

“Most people don’t realize what information can be used against them until it’s too late,” John Bambinek, a researcher at cybersecurity firm Netenrich, told Lifewire in an email interview. “Victims of domestic violence, harmful employers, and scammers can all use the wealth of information on our smartphones (or generated by them) to attack us in a variety of ways.”

watch you

Child looking at his phone under the blanket.

Westend61/Getty Images

Online anonymity is harder than you think.

Most recent publication in the peer-reviewed journal natural communication We investigated anonymized data from over 40,000 mobile phone users, primarily in messaging apps. Researchers at a European research institute found that they could identify a person 15% of the time by looking for patterns in the data.

“Our results show that unlinked, pseudonymized interaction data remain identifiable for long periods of time,” the researchers wrote in the paper.

The findings of the study are not surprising to Bambinek. He said it can be used to anonymize data as long as it can link unique data points to an individual’s identity. For example, some studies have shown that a smartphone can uniquely identify an individual by finding a correlation to four common locations where the device is visible.

“A unique username that correlates across applications (such as for games) can also help with identity generation,” he said. “Most online dating apps have unique identifiers that can be profiled so that stalkers can investigate potential matches outside of the dating app (and security team).

The time changes and the date changes.

It was easier to hide from the internet. Cybersecurity expert Scott Schober said in an email interview with Lifewire that in the past it was difficult to connect users and habits when data was collected by directly linking them to a cell phone number or name.

“This has changed a lot in the last few years, especially since a lot of data is being collected from smartphones, where cell phone numbers or usernames are not really needed,” he added.

“The greatest value is giving apps and services the minimum number of permissions they need to run on your phone.”

Schober said that much of the data users leak is metadata (data that provides information about other data), but not the actual content. By carefully analyzing the collected metadata, hackers were able to determine facts about individual data sets such as phone calls, SMS texts, and photos.

“Often a date and time stamp is associated with a person’s closely related common habits, interests, and activities,” Schober notes. “This aggregated data set with phone numbers and names removed still gives you full insight into a person’s life, so you’re no longer anonymous and you can learn a lot about your daily life.”

Maintaining privacy online is a complex matter, but there are a few steps you can take to help.

If you’re an iPhone user, remember that Apple can reset your advertiser ID at any time. Cybersecurity expert Vikram Venkatasubramanian pointed out in an email interview with Lifewire. Regularly resetting your ID will remove your data.

“It’s a good thing to keep privacy,” he said. “But the greatest value is in giving apps and services the minimum number of permissions they need to run on your phone.”

Users should ensure that the app cannot access their social media profiles. Venkatasubramanian said it’s also a good idea to be mindful of which apps can access the camera and microphone.

“There’s absolutely no reason for the ‘weather’ app to have access to a camera, microphone or local file,” he added. “And last but not least, you can only download apps from reputable app stores.”


More information

Your Smartphone May Be Revealing Details of Your Life

Hiding on the Internet is hard

Key Takeaways
It’s hard to protect your privacy on the internet because your phone is leaking data about you all the time, researchers say. 
Hackers can find phone calls, SMS texts, and photographs tied to users by closely analyzing metadata. 
You should never give apps access to your social media profiles.
Oscar Wong / Getty Images

Your smartphone may be leaking data about you. 

A new study says that phone manufacturers and developers aren’t doing enough to preserve the anonymity of users. Researchers found people can now be identified with just a few details of how they communicate with apps. The news comes amid growing concern about the diminishing level of privacy on the internet. 

“Most people don’t know what information can be used against them until it’s already too late,” John Bambenek, a researcher at the cybersecurity company Netenrich, told Lifewire in an email interview. “Domestic violence victims, toxic employers, and scammers can all make use of the copious amount of information on our smartphones (or generated by our smartphones) and use it against us in a variety of ways.”

Watching You
Westend61 / Getty Images

Anonymity on the internet is harder than you might think. 

The recent paper in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications explored anonymized data from more than 40,000 mobile phone users, mainly from messaging apps. The researchers from European research institutions searched for patterns in the data and found they could identify the person 15 percent of the time.

“Our results provide evidence that disconnected and even re-pseudonymized interaction data remain identifiable even across long periods of time,” wrote the researchers in the paper. 

The study results come as no surprise to Bambenek. As long as you can tie a unique data point to someone’s identity, it can be used to deanonymize data, he said. For instance, some research has shown that smartphones can be uniquely identified to an individual by looking for a correlation of as little as four common locations the device is seen at. 

“Unique usernames (for instance, for games) correlated across applications could help create an identity as well,” he said. “Most online dating apps have unique identifiers that can also be profiled to allow stalkers to research potential matches outside the dating apps (and their safety teams).

Times Are Changing and So Is Your Data

It used to be easier to hide on the internet. In the past, when data was collected with a direct connection to a mobile phone number or a name, it was difficult to connect a user and their habits, cybersecurity expert Scott Schober told Lifewire in an email interview. 

“This has drastically changed, especially over the past few years where now you really do not need the mobile phone number or name of the user to make the connection as there is so much rich data that is collected from a smartphone,” he added. 

“The biggest bang for the buck comes from giving apps and services only the least amount of privileges needed to run on your phone.”

Much of the data that spills from users is called metadata (data that provides information about other data) but not the actual content, Schober said. By closely analyzing the collected metadata, hackers could determine facts about individual data sets such as phone calls, SMS texts, and photographs. 

“Often there are date and time stamps associated which share habits, interests, and activities the individual is intimately involved in,” Schober pointed out. “This collected data set with the phone number and name removed still provide a complete glimpse into one’s life enough that they are no longer an anonymous user and much about their daily lives can be learned.”

Maintaining your privacy on the internet is a complex problem, but there are some steps you can take that can help. 

If you’re an iPhone user, keep in mind that Apple allows you to reset your Advertiser ID at any time, pointed out cybersecurity expert Vikram Venkatasubramanian in an email interview with Lifewire. Periodically resetting the ID delinks your data from you. 

“This is a good thing to do as a privacy hygiene habit,” he said. “But the biggest bang for the buck comes from giving apps and services only the least amount of privileges needed to run on your phone.” 

Users should make sure to never give apps access to their social media profiles. It’s also a good idea to be careful about which apps can access your camera and microphone, Venkatasubramanian said.

“There is absolutely no reason why a ‘weather’ app should be allowed to access your camera, microphone, or local files,” he added. “And last but not the least, always download apps only from reputable app stores.”

#Smartphone #Revealing #Details #Life

Your Smartphone May Be Revealing Details of Your Life

Hiding on the Internet is hard

Key Takeaways
It’s hard to protect your privacy on the internet because your phone is leaking data about you all the time, researchers say. 
Hackers can find phone calls, SMS texts, and photographs tied to users by closely analyzing metadata. 
You should never give apps access to your social media profiles.
Oscar Wong / Getty Images

Your smartphone may be leaking data about you. 

A new study says that phone manufacturers and developers aren’t doing enough to preserve the anonymity of users. Researchers found people can now be identified with just a few details of how they communicate with apps. The news comes amid growing concern about the diminishing level of privacy on the internet. 

“Most people don’t know what information can be used against them until it’s already too late,” John Bambenek, a researcher at the cybersecurity company Netenrich, told Lifewire in an email interview. “Domestic violence victims, toxic employers, and scammers can all make use of the copious amount of information on our smartphones (or generated by our smartphones) and use it against us in a variety of ways.”

Watching You
Westend61 / Getty Images

Anonymity on the internet is harder than you might think. 

The recent paper in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications explored anonymized data from more than 40,000 mobile phone users, mainly from messaging apps. The researchers from European research institutions searched for patterns in the data and found they could identify the person 15 percent of the time.

“Our results provide evidence that disconnected and even re-pseudonymized interaction data remain identifiable even across long periods of time,” wrote the researchers in the paper. 

The study results come as no surprise to Bambenek. As long as you can tie a unique data point to someone’s identity, it can be used to deanonymize data, he said. For instance, some research has shown that smartphones can be uniquely identified to an individual by looking for a correlation of as little as four common locations the device is seen at. 

“Unique usernames (for instance, for games) correlated across applications could help create an identity as well,” he said. “Most online dating apps have unique identifiers that can also be profiled to allow stalkers to research potential matches outside the dating apps (and their safety teams).

Times Are Changing and So Is Your Data

It used to be easier to hide on the internet. In the past, when data was collected with a direct connection to a mobile phone number or a name, it was difficult to connect a user and their habits, cybersecurity expert Scott Schober told Lifewire in an email interview. 

“This has drastically changed, especially over the past few years where now you really do not need the mobile phone number or name of the user to make the connection as there is so much rich data that is collected from a smartphone,” he added. 

“The biggest bang for the buck comes from giving apps and services only the least amount of privileges needed to run on your phone.”

Much of the data that spills from users is called metadata (data that provides information about other data) but not the actual content, Schober said. By closely analyzing the collected metadata, hackers could determine facts about individual data sets such as phone calls, SMS texts, and photographs. 

“Often there are date and time stamps associated which share habits, interests, and activities the individual is intimately involved in,” Schober pointed out. “This collected data set with the phone number and name removed still provide a complete glimpse into one’s life enough that they are no longer an anonymous user and much about their daily lives can be learned.”

Maintaining your privacy on the internet is a complex problem, but there are some steps you can take that can help. 

If you’re an iPhone user, keep in mind that Apple allows you to reset your Advertiser ID at any time, pointed out cybersecurity expert Vikram Venkatasubramanian in an email interview with Lifewire. Periodically resetting the ID delinks your data from you. 

“This is a good thing to do as a privacy hygiene habit,” he said. “But the biggest bang for the buck comes from giving apps and services only the least amount of privileges needed to run on your phone.” 

Users should make sure to never give apps access to their social media profiles. It’s also a good idea to be careful about which apps can access your camera and microphone, Venkatasubramanian said.

“There is absolutely no reason why a ‘weather’ app should be allowed to access your camera, microphone, or local files,” he added. “And last but not the least, always download apps only from reputable app stores.”

#Smartphone #Revealing #Details #Life


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